Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFood Science
IN THE NEWS

Food Science

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | April 9, 2014
A new ice cream flavor - Campfire Delight - will be available locally next month. The flavor was created by a team of students, most of them from Harford County, participating in this year's Ice Cream University, hosted by TIC Gums at the firm's Texture Innovation Center in White Marsh. Seventeen local high school students with interest in science, culinary arts and marketing participated in this year's program, which is based on Cornell University's Food Science 101 course, required for incoming freshman of the College of Food Science.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | April 9, 2014
A new ice cream flavor - Campfire Delight - will be available locally next month. The flavor was created by a team of students, most of them from Harford County, participating in this year's Ice Cream University, hosted by TIC Gums at the firm's Texture Innovation Center in White Marsh. Seventeen local high school students with interest in science, culinary arts and marketing participated in this year's program, which is based on Cornell University's Food Science 101 course, required for incoming freshman of the College of Food Science.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Ever wandered through a supermarket, picked up an item and wondered who helped determine the use-by date stamped on the product? Or who helped fill in the nutritional information on the label?Or who tests for bacteria, yeast, mold, toxins and pesticide residues on foods?If you live in the Mid-Atlantic states, chances are you should be thinking of Strasburger & Siegel Inc., a Hanover-based lab specializing in food science."We are the last bastion standing between you and millions of swarming bacteria trying to invade you," said Alan D. Parker, director of consulting services and one of three longtime former employees who bought Strasburger & Siegel three years ago.To determine the shelf-life of a product, the lab accelerates the product's aging process by storing it in an environmental chamber and regulating such variables as light, temperature and humidity.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 16, 2012
Many Americans make meals out of leftovers from their meals. And while everyone knows to refrigerate perishables, not everyone is taking all the proper steps to ensure the next-day food is safe, according to the Institute of Food Technologists , a nonprofit society of food science professionals from academia, government and industry. The group definitely supports leftovers, and even says some foods actually taste better the next day, such as those with spices, because the flavors have time to meld.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 16, 2012
Many Americans make meals out of leftovers from their meals. And while everyone knows to refrigerate perishables, not everyone is taking all the proper steps to ensure the next-day food is safe, according to the Institute of Food Technologists , a nonprofit society of food science professionals from academia, government and industry. The group definitely supports leftovers, and even says some foods actually taste better the next day, such as those with spices, because the flavors have time to meld.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | September 14, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley is set to announce this morning members of a new Life Sciences Advisory Board, which was created to further his professed mission of making "Maryland the bioscience capital of the world." Fifteen people from the industry, academia and government are to serve on the panel, including Chairman H. Thomas Watkins, chief executive of Rockville's Human Genome Sciences. The life sciences industry - which encompasses biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, food science and medical devices and technologies - has repeatedly been tagged by state politicians and officials as key to economic growth.
FEATURES
By Janet Helm | September 6, 2007
Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food. Those were the words of the famed Greek physician Hippocrates nearly 3,000 years ago. Today you can barely tell the difference between the two. Or at least the line is getting fuzzier. We've boldly entered an era of nutraceuticals: a blending of foods and pharmaceuticals dubbed "phoods" and "bepherages." These functional foods and beverages are no flash in the pan. They've grown into a huge market estimated at nearly $25 billion and destined to reach $39 billion by 2011, according to the market research publisher Packaged Facts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,los angeles times | April 2, 2000
To care about the color of cat food -- to really fuss over, say, a roast-beefy red -- you must loathe hues of rust and old gravy. You must adore the way that an Italian grape skin extract can hold its purple with such might during the heat of pasteurization that it won't brown out (this is tricky, though). No matter where you turn, the world must explode at you in tangerines and peacock blues and glorious color, the way it does for Gabriel J. Lauro, food scientist. Lauro is the unpaid director of the Natural Color Resource Center at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2001
THE NICE thing about our recent weather is that it permits us to experience such variety. Why go on vacation to Florida for the tan and Colorado for the skiing when we can experience balmy breezes on Monday and snow on Thursday - and never have to visit an airport? In this changeable time on the cusp of spring, our neighborhood has seen a flurry of activities and accomplishments. Fourth-graders Marketa Kletetschkova, Sean Hoe and Jon Mills have started a food drive at Laurel Woods Elementary School to collect canned goods for FISH, a food pantry and referral service for the needy.
EXPLORE
November 7, 2011
Members of the Harford Tech FFA Chapter formed one of 29 teams participating in the National FFA Food Science and Technology Career Development Event. The event was held in conjunction with the 84th National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind. The team, led by advisor Naomi Knight, was awarded a bronze emblem. Members also competed for individual awards with 112 other participants. Kelly Kundratic received a bronze emblem, Sarah Martin received a bronze emblem, Ashley Riemer received a bronze emblem, and Marisa Tenney received a silver emblem.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | September 14, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley is set to announce this morning members of a new Life Sciences Advisory Board, which was created to further his professed mission of making "Maryland the bioscience capital of the world." Fifteen people from the industry, academia and government are to serve on the panel, including Chairman H. Thomas Watkins, chief executive of Rockville's Human Genome Sciences. The life sciences industry - which encompasses biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, food science and medical devices and technologies - has repeatedly been tagged by state politicians and officials as key to economic growth.
FEATURES
By Janet Helm | September 6, 2007
Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food. Those were the words of the famed Greek physician Hippocrates nearly 3,000 years ago. Today you can barely tell the difference between the two. Or at least the line is getting fuzzier. We've boldly entered an era of nutraceuticals: a blending of foods and pharmaceuticals dubbed "phoods" and "bepherages." These functional foods and beverages are no flash in the pan. They've grown into a huge market estimated at nearly $25 billion and destined to reach $39 billion by 2011, according to the market research publisher Packaged Facts.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2001
THE NICE thing about our recent weather is that it permits us to experience such variety. Why go on vacation to Florida for the tan and Colorado for the skiing when we can experience balmy breezes on Monday and snow on Thursday - and never have to visit an airport? In this changeable time on the cusp of spring, our neighborhood has seen a flurry of activities and accomplishments. Fourth-graders Marketa Kletetschkova, Sean Hoe and Jon Mills have started a food drive at Laurel Woods Elementary School to collect canned goods for FISH, a food pantry and referral service for the needy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,los angeles times | April 2, 2000
To care about the color of cat food -- to really fuss over, say, a roast-beefy red -- you must loathe hues of rust and old gravy. You must adore the way that an Italian grape skin extract can hold its purple with such might during the heat of pasteurization that it won't brown out (this is tricky, though). No matter where you turn, the world must explode at you in tangerines and peacock blues and glorious color, the way it does for Gabriel J. Lauro, food scientist. Lauro is the unpaid director of the Natural Color Resource Center at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Ever wandered through a supermarket, picked up an item and wondered who helped determine the use-by date stamped on the product? Or who helped fill in the nutritional information on the label?Or who tests for bacteria, yeast, mold, toxins and pesticide residues on foods?If you live in the Mid-Atlantic states, chances are you should be thinking of Strasburger & Siegel Inc., a Hanover-based lab specializing in food science."We are the last bastion standing between you and millions of swarming bacteria trying to invade you," said Alan D. Parker, director of consulting services and one of three longtime former employees who bought Strasburger & Siegel three years ago.To determine the shelf-life of a product, the lab accelerates the product's aging process by storing it in an environmental chamber and regulating such variables as light, temperature and humidity.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | November 5, 2003
To reduce the risk of prostate cancer, it might take the whole tomato. New research on rats suggests that eating whole tomatoes can reduce prostate cancer deaths more effectively than taking supplements of lycopene, a chemical in tomatoes that has been associated with lower prostate cancer risk. Earlier studies in humans found a link between high lycopene blood levels and a lower risk of prostate cancer, but it was not clear whether lycopene was the effective agent or whether it simply signified tomato consumption.
NEWS
January 23, 1995
Dr. Bernard L. Oser, 95, a biochemist whose work enriched public awareness of what can safely go into food, beverages and cosmetics, died Saturday of gastrointestinal illness in Englewood, N.J. He spent 47 years with Food Research Laboratories, later Food and Drug Research Laboratories, as it grew into one of the country's foremost commercial testing grounds for wholesomeness. He retired as chairman and owner in 1973. He was credited with alerting the food industry in the 1950s to the need for toxicologic studies and safety evaluations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.