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NEWS
June 30, 2012
If you've lost power for a prolonged period, follow these tips regarding food safety from the Baltimore City Health Department: •Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to maintain the cold temperature. •The refrigerator will keep food cold for about four hours if it is unopened. •A full freezer will keep the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed. •Buy dry or block ice to keep the refrigerator as cold as possible.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
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NEWS
September 22, 2010
After the recent recall of half a billion eggs because of salmonella contamination, it's unacceptable that the U.S. Senate is at a stalemate on a bipartisan food safety reform bill ("GOP senator says he will hold up food safety bill," Sept. 16). Since July 2009, when the House of Representatives voted to bring the FDA's food safety authority into the 21st century, Maryland alone has had 56 food recalls. That's 56 times Marylanders have been told that food in our kitchens was unsafe to eat. We should not be at risk of illness and death from the food we eat. Maryland Sens.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 17, 2014
Thousands of Americans are still being infected by their food every year, and infections from only one germ among 80 tracked by government officials dropped significantly in 2013, according to new data from U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rate of Salmonella infections dropped by about 9 percent compared with the previous three years, though it was unchanged from 2006-2008, baseline years used for comparison. But campylobacter infections mostly from dairy and chicken are up 13 percent since 2006-2008.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 25, 2013
Pet food manufacturers would be required to develop safety plans and adopt procedures to prevent foodborne illnesses if FDA regulations proposed today are adopted. The proposed rules were developed as part of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) to improve the safety of pet food sold in the United States. The rules come on the heels of an announcement that more than 600 pets have died after consuming jerky snacks; no reason has been found for the deaths. Under the new rules, animal feed and pet food manufacturers would have to develop plans for both preventing contamination in food, and for correcting problems that arise.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 25, 2012
The United States is not making progress in improving the safety of food as hundreds of people continue to be sickened by unsafe food linked to recalls each year, according to a new report. The report by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund found that from January 2011 through September 2012  more than 1,750 people got sick by tainted food that was eventually recalled and pulled from store shelves. Thirty-seven people died. The food recalls during that time period included cantaloupe, ground turkey, papaya, mangoes, raw tuna and peanut butter linked to salmonella outbreaks.
NEWS
January 5, 2011
So, the first thing the new batch of Republican tea-partiers plan to do when they take control of government is to try to fight against the new rules for food safety ("Republicans to fight food regulation," Jan. 5)? They actually think the American people sent them to Washington to make sure big business can poison us with toxic chemicals and bacteria. Wow. Are they planning to personally spit in our food too? They really are as stupid as they sounded before the election. And here I thought it was just an act. Amazing.
MOBILE
By Meredith Cohn and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 26, 2011
Here is some more information from officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for before and after the hurricane. --On carbon monoxide: This is generated by gas-powered appliances such as generators and charcoal and gas grills. It's invisible, odorless, tasteless and highly poisonous. Signs of trouble include fatigue, weakness, chest pains for those with heart disease, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, headaches, confusion, impaired vision and loss of consciousness.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
The United States imports most of its produce and seafood, but federal regulators manage to inspect just 1 percent of imported food. Amid growing concerns about food-borne illnesses and American's increasing appetite for imports, the University of Maryland, the Food and Drug Administration and a Massachusetts technology company have launched what is being called the first U.S.-based laboratory to train foreign food exporters on the science behind...
NEWS
June 6, 2011
The deadly outbreak of E. coli in Germany that has taken 22 lives and sickened some 2,200 is a reminder both of how vulnerable we can be to food-borne illness and how important it is to have a strong food safety system. American health officials report that so far there is no evidence that the rare strain of E. coli found in Germany has entered the United States food system. E. coli can be found in human and animal feces, and it spreads to vegetables via animal waste in fields and irrigation water, or from farm workers' poor hand-washing.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption to Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington and 970 locations in California alone. About 8.7 million pounds were shipped all through 2013 by Rancho Feeding Corporation of Petaluma, California. The recall comes in the wake of USDA's new "inspection" program that allows the meat industry to increase speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | February 20, 2014
Editor: The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption. About 8.7 million pounds were shipped. The recall comes in the wake of USDA's new "inspection" program that allows the meat industry to increase speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees. Traditionally, USDA has catered more to the interests and profitability of the meat industry than health and safety of American consumers.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 25, 2013
Pet food manufacturers would be required to develop safety plans and adopt procedures to prevent foodborne illnesses if FDA regulations proposed today are adopted. The proposed rules were developed as part of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) to improve the safety of pet food sold in the United States. The rules come on the heels of an announcement that more than 600 pets have died after consuming jerky snacks; no reason has been found for the deaths. Under the new rules, animal feed and pet food manufacturers would have to develop plans for both preventing contamination in food, and for correcting problems that arise.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
EXPLORE
September 30, 2013
Whether it's making gourmet jams or jellies, baking bread and cakes, catering festive events or creating and packaging special dinners for one, food related businesses are becoming increasingly popular as a way to earn a living (or to add to your income). The cook's creative flair, combined with business practicality, will succeed even in tough economic times, if the enterprise is given the appropriate research and planning before its launch. University of Maryland Extension's Food for Profit workshop takes its "students" step by step through the information necessary to start and run a small food product business.
NEWS
By Tom Hucker and Jennie Forehand | August 26, 2013
When Democratic Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota, ranking member of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, helped Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa craft an amendment to the Farm Bill that would nullify dozens - if not hundreds - of state laws, this was his explanation, clear and simple: "I'm tired of these states doing this crap. " And apparently a narrow majority of the House of Representatives agrees, since this amendment was included in the pared-down version of the Farm Bill that passed the House, 216-208.
NEWS
By Scott Krugman | June 10, 2013
As a pediatrician, my No. 1 concern is to keep children safe and healthy. Inside the walls of my office, I can provide services and counseling to help do just that, whether by giving an infant her first childhood vaccine, providing a mental health screening to an adolescent patient or counseling parents about how to keep their homes as safe as possible. Unfortunately, there are some threats to children's health that are beyond my control, including the food they consume. As was brought to light all too clearly recently when children as young as 1 year old were among the 81 people from 18 states (including Maryland)
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | October 31, 2012
If your power is still out you'll need to take care with the food in your refrigerator. Here are some tips from the U.S. Department of Agriculture on how to prevent foodborne illnesses. If the Power Goes Out: Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours if you keep the door closed. A full freezer will keep its temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if half-full) If the power is out for an extended period of time, buy dry or block ice to keep the refrigerator as cold as possible.
NEWS
By Scott Krugman | June 10, 2013
As a pediatrician, my No. 1 concern is to keep children safe and healthy. Inside the walls of my office, I can provide services and counseling to help do just that, whether by giving an infant her first childhood vaccine, providing a mental health screening to an adolescent patient or counseling parents about how to keep their homes as safe as possible. Unfortunately, there are some threats to children's health that are beyond my control, including the food they consume. As was brought to light all too clearly recently when children as young as 1 year old were among the 81 people from 18 states (including Maryland)
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