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NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | November 20, 1990
At a time when the demand for emergency food assistance is rising sharply, the Maryland Department of Human Resources is eliminating funding for two nutrition programs that help feed the poor.The state's budget cuts, which total $235,000, will make it harder for Maryland's non-profit food banks to meet the increasing demand for emergency food aid, Linda Eisenberg, executive director of the Maryland Food Committee, said yesterday.The cuts also will threaten a badly needed food assistance program for migrant farm workers on the Eastern Shore, she said.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Those who qualify for free and reduced price lunch in Baltimore City schools - 84 percent of students -- have few options in the summer. But a federally-sponsored program will bring food to many of these kids beginning Tuesday, when Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Family League will announce goals that include an increase in meals to 1.5 million, up from 1.24 million last summer. As part of the program, Mobile Meals brings food twice a day to young children and teens in underserved areas of the city, and officials are seeking changes to the program to increase the meals to three a day. "There is no excuse for any child in our city to worry where their next meal will come from, and they should never, ever go to bed hungry," said Rawlings-Blake in a statement.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic-led House is trying to seize the Republican "family values" theme by approving new federal spending on child welfare and food programs and imposing a 10 percent surtax on millionaires to pay for them.Opponents charged that the measure, adopted on a 256-163 roll-call vote yesterday with relatively few Republican votes, was an election-year ploy that would be vetoed by President Bush if it were passed by Congress. The legislation faces an uncertain fate in the Senate.
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | June 26, 2014
When school let out for the summer, most of the children in Baltimore who qualify for free and reduced price meals - 84 percent - lost access to the three meals a day they count on during the school year. Struggling families and children turn to community leaders who run summer supplemental programs, like Hattie Bailey, who serves meals at Full Gospel Fellowship Church through the federally-funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). But since SFSP only provides two meals per day, Ms. Bailey is unable to serve supper to the children in her program if she serves them breakfast and lunch.
NEWS
January 30, 1995
Block grants can be effective ways to distribute federal aid to states and cities, but for food and nutrition programs they would be a good idea gone bad. The proposed Personal Responsibility Act, part of the Contract with America, would combine all federal food assistance programs into one block grant to states, eliminating all uniform national standards for these programs and giving states broad discretion in designing programs. It would also require the U.S. Department of Agriculture to stop donating commodities to these programs and force states to pay for them.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Advocates called for up to $15 billion in new government food programs after the release yesterday of a new two-year study showing that one in four American children suffers from hunger or is in danger of hunger.About 5.5 million children under age 12 are hungry and 6 million others are at risk, and hungry children are more likely to suffer health problems and miss school, said the Food Research and Action Center, a Washington-based nutrition advocacy group that conducted the study.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration denounced a major element yesterday of the House Republicans' welfare bill, which would replace most federal food and nutrition programs with cash grants to be administered by the states.The administration said the Republican proposal would cut at least $5.2 billion -- almost 13 percent -- from the $40.8 billion that would otherwise be spent on food assistance next year.In a report analyzing the bill, the Agriculture Department said yesterday that the Republican proposal also would eliminate "all uniform nutrition standards" now set by the federal government for school lunches, the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and other food programs.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Those who qualify for free and reduced price lunch in Baltimore City schools - 84 percent of students -- have few options in the summer. But a federally-sponsored program will bring food to many of these kids beginning Tuesday, when Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Family League will announce goals that include an increase in meals to 1.5 million, up from 1.24 million last summer. As part of the program, Mobile Meals brings food twice a day to young children and teens in underserved areas of the city, and officials are seeking changes to the program to increase the meals to three a day. "There is no excuse for any child in our city to worry where their next meal will come from, and they should never, ever go to bed hungry," said Rawlings-Blake in a statement.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Republican team taking over the House of Representatives in January will propose a welfare bill that eliminates a decades-old guiding principle of poverty and food programs: that anyone who qualifies for these benefits automatically gets them.Under the proposal drafted by House Republicans for submission in January, Congress would set an overall annual limit on welfare spending and replace food stamps and child-nutrition programs with a lump sum payment to each state.The Republicans would consolidate 10 nutrition programs into a "food assistance block grant," cut the available money by 5 percent and then set a limit on spending.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 29, 1994
Washington. -- I remember with pride the day in 1968 when the conservative Reader's Digest commissioned me to write an article about the hunger that was then so widespread in the United States.I became appalled to learn how many children were being born in America with mental retardation, stunted bodies or organs damaged because of nutritional deprivation starting in the wombs of their ill-fed mothers. I was shocked by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings' admission of the number of children -- even old people -- in South Carolina who suffered from rickets, scurvy and other ailments because they never got enough food, let alone the right kind.
NEWS
By Meredith Slater | December 17, 2013
Food insecurity has become a major issue in the United States. More families than ever before are depending on government assistance and other nutritional aid to supplement their diets. And the problem is only going to get worse as Congress considers billions of dollars in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. Food prices have risen in the past couple of years due to droughts in the United States and other countries. Grain, dairy and meat products - items that are staples in the diets of most families - have been especially vulnerable to price increases.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
After researching the county website countyofhowardmd.us/ foodscraps.htm including viewing the "Food scrap pictures from the mini-pilot" located under the Additional Resources sub-heading at the bottom of the page, I am horrified that Howard County is planning to implement the food scrap program in our community. A significant amount of litter is generated on "blue bin" recycling days, due to either residents overflowing their blue bins, and/or the trash collectors losing some of the bin contents when emptying into the truck.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Grocery prices may be rising - 1.5 to 2.5 percent next year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture - but the ability of poor people to buy them is about to shrink. On Friday, benefits for 47.6 million Americans participating in the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps, will be reduced. The size of that reduction is substantial - about $5 billion per year nationwide - and it amounts to about $36 less for a low-income family of four or $11 for an individual.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
With the federal shutdown, Maryland can only pay to feed low-income women and children for a "limited period of time," the state's budget secretary said Wednesday. The state can cover the cost of food stamps and energy programs until the end of October, the secretary said. But she is still talking with the White House and its budget office on how to pay for the federal Women, Infant and Children nutrition program that helps feed about 150,000 people in Maryland each year. "That is one program that the government has said they're not going to provide funding for," Department of Budget and Management Sec. T. Eloise Foster said at a Board of Public Works meeting.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 10 Baltimore business owners or operators on charges of stealing nearly $7 million from food assistance programs by agreeing to debit cash for beneficiaries without selling food - then keeping a cut of the proceeds. The owner of a corner grocery in West Baltimore called "Second Obama Express" is accused of obtaining more than $2 million in payments for food sales that never occurred, a practice that authorities call "food stamp trafficking. " Eight others are accused of taking between $348,000 and $1.4 million.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
The number of residents receiving food stamps in Howard County has increased by nearly 30 percent in the past year, one of several indications that people are struggling in one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, according to a report commissioned by two local organizations. The number of students requiring free school lunches has risen 20 percent, while the number of food bank grants has risen 27.4 percent since last year, according to a study by the Policy Analysis Center, a partnership between the Association of Community Services and the Horizon Foundation.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Just as the corporate and government landscapes don't resemble what they looked like a few years back, the effort to stem hunger in this country is a markedly changed operation, too.In 1980, less than 50 soup kitchens and pantries dotted Maryland. Today, there are nearly 600. Food collection drives, once confined to Thanksgiving week, are now held by churches and synagogues year-round. Area soup kitchens and food pantries, once temporary set-ups, now stay open most of the week to satisfy mounting demand.
NEWS
December 19, 2007
Congressional Democrats are concluding their first year in the majority by taking a shellacking in showdowns with President Bush. A months-long budget battle ended this week with the Democrats caving in to Mr. Bush's demand that no strings be tied to Iraq war funding and that domestic spending remain essentially flat. The score in a separate high-profile dispute over expanding the State Children's Health Insurance Program stands at Bush 2 (vetoes), Congress 0 (legislation signed into law.)
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
When the loaded school bus arrives in a Jessup parking lot each month, 40 Clarksville Middle School sixth-graders tumble out in a tangle of chatty anticipation and field trip-fueled glee. But instead of visiting a museum or historical site, the 11-year-olds are making a pilgrimage to Morningside Park Apartments, where they deliver bags of food and toiletries to residents who depend on the donations to make ends meet. Later, on those same days, fifth-graders from Pointers Run Elementary play out the same scene with a different set of residents.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2010
All six children left in Laverne Randall's care receive a nightly buffet. By the time she picks the kids up from a summer program, they have already eaten. When Randall arrives at her home a block away, she has another hot meal ready on the stove. "I cook every day. They eat [at the center], then they go to my house and eat," said Randall, who watches the kids during the evening before their parents pick them up. But not all of the other 35 elementary school-age children who take part in the Pimlico Road Summer Youth Program are as fortunate.
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