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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
What's new in natural foods?you imagine that the people behind the latest trends in organic, all-natural, wheat-, sugar-, fat- and preservative-free, homeopathic, herbal, vegan and vegetarian products wear braids, beards and Birkenstocks, you might be surprised by the answer.It's Southwestern, Italian and Thai-influenced cuisine, it's "light" corn chips and exotic-vegetable chips, it's extra-virgin olive oil, fat-free salad dressings and gourmet chocolates and Wolfgang Puck pizzas -- in short, it's everything new in the mainstream world of food products.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
TIC Gums in Harford County is perhaps the biggest privately owned player in an invisible part of the food industry. It's not chewing gum, though the company does get some visitors who assume that's what it makes. The name refers to a different kind of gum - the type known as hydrocolloids, which hold the ingredients in your ranch dressing together and influence the way food feels in your mouth. The natural additives give many products their texture and consistency. "Just about anything you buy in the grocery store needs some level of it," said Greg Andon, the company's president.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a long-awaited policy statement, the federal government plans to announce that foods developed through biotechnology are not inherently dangerous and, except rare cases, should not require extraordinary testing and regulation before going on the market.Some critics of genetically engineered foods have argued that they pose new safety risks and any foods that contain new substances should go through the extensive testing required of new food additives.In addition, they say, any such food sold to the public should be labeled so that consumers can identify it.The new policy, by contrast, holds that genetically engineered foods should be regulated just like ordinary ones unless they contain ingredients not usual for the product.
NEWS
April 6, 2013
The following is the text of a letter to parents, dated Friday, April 5, that was sent home with students attending 14 Harford County public schools where a recalled food product, Pepperoni Pizzatas by Rich Products Corp., was served to students earlier in the week: Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s): As a follow-up to the call that was made yesterday evening regarding the food product recall, we wanted to be sure you were aware of the recall details, possible symptoms associated with consumption of contaminated food products and contact information for school system departments that can assist with questions and concerns.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1995
JP Foodservice Inc., the Columbia-based institutional food distributor that has been charting an aggressive growth strategy, announced yesterday that it has bought most of Rotelle Inc., a Pennsylvania company in the same business.The $6.2 million acquisition of Rotelle, a subsidiary of Richfoods Inc. of Richmond, Va., is part of a rapid expansion program for the cash-rich JP, which paid off much of its heavy debt load when it went public in November 1994."This company is just poised for growth.
FEATURES
By Frances Grandy Taylor and Frances Grandy Taylor,Hartford Courant | July 21, 1993
As a boy, Wiley Mullins spent his time watching his mother cook in their home in Tuscumbia, Ala. Her specialties were staples of the African-American soul-food tradition: dirty rice, collards and turnip greens, fried chicken and catfish, black-eyed peas and butter beans.At home in his kitchen in Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Mullins whips up his own version of dirty rice: browned ground hamburger, white rice and about a half cup of seasoning with water added. In a matter of minutes, a steaming plate of spicy rice is ready to enjoy.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 25, 1992
Gay Williams runs a small food business from a three-room office on Falls Road in Mount Washington, but her ambitions embrace the world. Someday she hopes to see her sweet, hot mustard sold in stores from Tokyo to Damascus.She has joined with other Maryland food producers to form the Maryland Food Exporters Association, a group that is helping its members penetrate world markets.The president of Hunt Cup Ltd., Ms. Williams is also a founding member of the association, which was created late last year.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Chick-fil-A has my deepest admiration for being honest enough to take a firm stand on their beliefs ("Banned in Boston? If the mayor has his way," July 27). It is indeed rare in this day and age to witness a corporate CEO express an opinion on so controversial an issue as gay marriage. He has demonstrated that he is a man of integrity and not fearful of the backlash. Chick-fil-A has excellent fast food products and a courteous, efficient staff. It is never easy to take a stand, especially when you are the leader of a popular business establishment.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
Robert L. Walker, Maryland's secretary of agriculture since November 1991, resigned yesterday to take a job with the U.S. Department of Agriculture helping Ukrainian farmers improve production techniques and move to a free-market system.Mr. Walker has been appointed an agricultural policy adviser to the Ministry of Food and Agriculture in Ukraine, which was the breadbasket of the former Soviet Union. He will leave his state position in mid-April and begin his new job at the end of the month.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 15, 2012
Walmart is continuing to grow in Baltimore, opening its newest store Wednesday in Randallstown and planning to unveil an expansion of its Ellicott City store later this month. The retailer has hired 300 workers to staff the 150,000-square foot Randallstown location, at 8730 Liberty Road, which will offer a full line of groceries, including a bakery, a deli, meat and dairy products and a produce department. Subway restaurant and SmartStyle Family Hair Salon are leasing space in the 24-hour-a-day location.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Last spring I received a small azalea plant. I kept it outside in the pot all summer and recently brought it indoors. Should its nut-like nodules — maybe next year's buds or last year's flower remnants — be removed? Suggestions for overwintering the plant? Leave the "nodules"; they're probably buds. Always move your plant gradually from one temperature to another, whether indoors to outdoors or from room to room indoors, to lessen adjustment shock. Keep your azalea in medium to bright light but not direct sunlight and as cool as possible.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 15, 2012
Walmart is continuing to grow in Baltimore, opening its newest store Wednesday in Randallstown and planning to unveil an expansion of its Ellicott City store later this month. The retailer has hired 300 workers to staff the 150,000-square foot Randallstown location, at 8730 Liberty Road, which will offer a full line of groceries, including a bakery, a deli, meat and dairy products and a produce department. Subway restaurant and SmartStyle Family Hair Salon are leasing space in the 24-hour-a-day location.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Chick-fil-A has my deepest admiration for being honest enough to take a firm stand on their beliefs ("Banned in Boston? If the mayor has his way," July 27). It is indeed rare in this day and age to witness a corporate CEO express an opinion on so controversial an issue as gay marriage. He has demonstrated that he is a man of integrity and not fearful of the backlash. Chick-fil-A has excellent fast food products and a courteous, efficient staff. It is never easy to take a stand, especially when you are the leader of a popular business establishment.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Farming in the city doesn't need a lot of land - and sometimes not even arable land. On a South Baltimore parking lot, inside six plastic-covered greenhouses, a handful of urban farmers are raising a cornucopia of greens in a thin layer of imported soil. Once the site of the city's maintenance garage, the half-acre "farm" on the paved-over brownfield by the Middle Branch now produces arugula, romaine, spring onions, basil, cilantro, fennel - even spicy edible flowers. And it's all organic, the growers say. Big City Farms is the name of this budding agricultural enterprise, operating on land now owned by the National Aquarium.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Organic products and those without preservatives and harsh processing remain big business in the United States — with $81 billion in sales last year — despite a tough economy. Sales in stores, online and in practitioners' offices were up 7 percent from the year before, according to the trade publication Natural Food Merchandiser, which conducts a survey every year. The public consumed items that included foods and herbal supplements, health and beauty items, and pet supplies. During the next few days, about 25,000 buyers from groceries, drugstores and big-box retailers, as well as distributors and food service operators at hospitals and colleges, will scour the aisles at the Natural Products Expo East, the largest show of its kind on the East Coast, to find the Next Big Things to put on store shelves.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
The United States imports most of its produce and seafood, but federal regulators manage to inspect just 1 percent of imported food. Amid growing concerns about food-borne illnesses and American's increasing appetite for imports, the University of Maryland, the Food and Drug Administration and a Massachusetts technology company have launched what is being called the first U.S.-based laboratory to train foreign food exporters on the science behind...
NEWS
May 7, 1994
Supermarkets are always full of "new, improved" foodstuffs. These days, however, the most noticeable -- and welcome -- improvement in grocery stores and snack machines is not the food itself but the information on its label. Starting tomorrow, new regulations governing the labeling of food products require bigger, simpler, more informative labels that should vastly increase consumers' ability to monitor what they eat.Under the old labeling system, only about 60 percent of food products carried labels at all; now virtually all of them will.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 9, 2002
The American hemp-food industry has been given an 11th-hour reprieve by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, which has decided to delay by 40 days its enforcement of rules barring the sale of foods containing THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana, DEA spokesman Will Glaspy says. In October, the DEA had set Thursday as the deadline for stores to remove from their shelves all food products made with hempseed or hempseed oil, which contain trace amounts of THC. The DEA has not claimed that the foods - including waffles, snack chips and salad oil - cause intoxication, only that the law sets no standard for allowable amounts of THC. The ruling does not apply to soaps or cosmetics made with hemp.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 24, 2008
Even if the price of oil falls, the governor should launch a full-fledged sustainability effort to promote an expansion of farming here and the production of more Maryland food for Marylanders. In fact, all the governors of the Chesapeake watershed should work up a 20-year strategic plan to expand agriculture and environmental education, create more farming opportunities for a new generation of growers, promote more aquaculture and organic farming, and create regional networks for getting local food to consumers.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | July 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Consumers have become more concerned about food safety and want to know more about the groceries they buy, a new survey reveals. Nearly 70 percent of more than 1,600 consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom surveyed in February expressed a low level of trust in the claims that branded food products make about their environmental impact and health benefits. The study also found that almost half of consumers are more concerned about food safety now than they were two years ago. "Quite honestly, we were very surprised at the strength of some of the results that came out the survey," said Guy Blisset, consumer products lead for the IBM Institute for Business Value, which conducted the survey.
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