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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | April 28, 1991
A new inspection system for restaurants and other businesses that serve food will be more thorough than the old system and will emphasizeproper food handling and preparation, county health officials said.Inspectors will use a computer to determine whether soup, meat, lasagna and other foods that could become contaminated are heated and cooled properly, said Tiffany Crone, acting director of community hygiene for the Carroll County Health Department.Some restaurant owners say they agree with the new system in principle, but are concerned the new procedures will be time-consuming and unnecessary.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
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NEWS
June 18, 2006
ISSUE: A bill before the Annapolis city council would tighten the rules covering sanitation procedures at the more than 200 restaurants in the city. The bill is intended to make sure that all food service workers are properly trained in food preparation, storage and handling, and that certified personnel are on staff at each establishment. YOUR VIEW: How much need is there for tighter regulation, and what areas of restaurant sanitation most concern you? Tell us what you think at arundel.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | September 21, 2009
If you crave shortening in your pie crust or french fries seeped in "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil," you'll have to dine outside Baltimore. As of Sunday, Baltimore restaurants, delis, bakeries and corner lunch carts can no longer prepare food that contains 0.5 grams or more of unhealthful trans fats per serving. The city joined a growing number of places, including Montgomery County, New York City, Philadelphia, Boston and California, to ban trans fats that health advocates say clog arteries and lead to heart disease.
FEATURES
September 30, 1990
Food has a history that is influenced by economics and politics. Through lectures, film screenings and discussions, participants in a new class offered this fall at the Johns Hopkins University will look at the meaning of food in American culture."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
The Maryland Food Bank broke ground Tuesday on a 6,000-square-foot, commercially equipped kitchen that will allow the nonprofit agency to turn fresh donations from area markets into about 1 million free meals a year. The $1.3 million facility at the food bank's headquarters in Halethorpe is expected to be completed in the spring and will also be used to train workers in food preparation. "We have many food markets willing to donate, but we have nowhere to turn the food into meals," said Audra Harrison, the food bank's spokeswoman.
NEWS
May 21, 1999
The Howard County Health Department regularly inspects food establishments. Violation of any of eight "critical items" -- those mostly likely to contribute to food-borne illness -- requires immediate correction or closure of the facility.Of 40 facilities inspected from April 6 to April 19, the six facilities listed below were cited for such violations. The numbers after the restaurant names and addresses correspond to descriptions below:Bob Evans Farms, 8325 Benson Drive (5)Friendship Pride, 12800 Frederick Road (7, closed)
NEWS
By Gina Davis | March 10, 2007
A Chuck E. Cheese's restaurant in eastern Baltimore County, where members of a family say they dined before becoming ill last weekend, will remain closed until it has hired a certified food handler and completed decontamination, county inspectors said yesterday. "They're now in a position where they're having to go through a complete cleaning process and sanitize everything from chairs to play equipment," said David A.C. Carroll, head of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management.
NEWS
By Charles Perry and Charles Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
Alan Davidson, a food writer and the center of a worldwide network of culinary scholars, died Tuesday at London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital after losing consciousness at his home a few hours earlier. He was 79. In recent years, he had suffered from various health problems, but on Nov. 5 he was able to accept the Dutch government's prestigious Erasmus Prize in Amsterdam. In the United States, Mr. Davidson was best-known for The Oxford Companion to Food. The 900-page book, reprinted as The Penguin Companion to Food, took 18 years to write and presented an immense amount of information about ingredients, food preparation and the world's cuisines in a disarmingly light, whimsical tone.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
The Maryland Food Bank broke ground Tuesday on a 6,000-square-foot, commercially equipped kitchen that will allow the nonprofit agency to turn fresh donations from area markets into about 1 million free meals a year. The $1.3 million facility at the food bank's headquarters in Halethorpe is expected to be completed in the spring and will also be used to train workers in food preparation. "We have many food markets willing to donate, but we have nowhere to turn the food into meals," said Audra Harrison, the food bank's spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
After local chef Jerry Pellegrino dined at Minibar restaurant in Washington two years ago, he felt as if he had just been to a Broadway show. There were no glitzy costumes or song-and-dance numbers. Instead, the executive chef of Corks restaurant in Federal Hill experienced a 34-course tasting menu that took hours to finish and cost more than $100. But after the meal, the chef still wasn't satisfied. "I left feeling hungry," said Pellegrino. "I had to grab a chili dog down the street."
NEWS
By Gina Davis | March 10, 2007
A Chuck E. Cheese's restaurant in eastern Baltimore County, where members of a family say they dined before becoming ill last weekend, will remain closed until it has hired a certified food handler and completed decontamination, county inspectors said yesterday. "They're now in a position where they're having to go through a complete cleaning process and sanitize everything from chairs to play equipment," said David A.C. Carroll, head of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management.
NEWS
June 21, 2006
ISSUE: A bill before the Annapolis city council would tighten the rules covering sanitation procedures at the city's more than 200 restaurants. The bill aims to make sure that all food service workers are properly trained in food preparation, storage and handling, and that certified personnel are on staff at each establishment. YOUR VIEW:How much need is there for tighter regulation, and what areas of restaurant sanitation most concern you? Tell us what you think at arundel.speakout@baltsun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 2005
Strip malls and sushi restaurants. They seem to go together, like, well, pickled ginger and wasabi paste. And Hikari Sushi, a Japanese and Korean restaurant that opened this summer in the Carney Village Shopping Center, is a fine example of the breed. From the outside, the former card and gift shop, squeezed between a Mars supermarket and a Chinese restaurant, looks rather dingy, and the handwritten sign on the door urging patrons to bring their own alcohol doesn't help. (Owner Se Joon An has applied for a beer and wine license.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | June 17, 2005
Priscilla Ellis, 61, a Boston psychologist and mediator, was suspicious the minute she opened the mass e-mail. And with good reason. It was an old e-rumor that has picked up steam recently, alleging that microwaving food in plastic containers releases dioxin, a carcinogen, or cancer-causing agent. The e-mail noted that the warning about dioxin had been sent out in a newsletter from Johns Hopkins, the esteemed medical institution in Baltimore, and that similar information was "being circulated" at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington.
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