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Food Poisoning

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 22, 2012
It's farmers' market time, and all those fruits and vegetables seem so fresh. But they aren't necessarily clean. Like supermarket produce, these local and even organic items need a wash before eating, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics , a professional education and advocacy group. The group and the food giant ConAgra are reminding everyone that one in six Americans get sick annually from food-borne pathogens. About 3,000 people die every year from food poisoning.
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NEWS
May 26, 2014
Folks ready to fire up their outdoor grill on Memorial Day face a deadly choice of inflicting food poisoning or cancer on family and friends: food poisoning by E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, if they under-cook the meat; cancer, if they heat meat to the point of creating cancer-causing compounds. Luckily, a bunch of enterprising food manufacturers and processors have met this challenge head-on by developing a great variety of healthful, delicious and convenient, un-chicken, veggie burgers and soy dogs.
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FEATURES
By Sam Sessa | July 7, 2012
Celebrity couple Stacy Keibler and George Clooney suffered food poisoning after eating at a restaurant in Italy this week, according to TMZ . Keibler and Clooney dined at a restaurant in Cernobbio, Italy on July 4, TMZ's sources report, and became sick soon after. "Finally had a bad meal in Italy, our whole dinner party got food poisoning #ohwell at least I'm still in Italy," Keibler tweeted the next day. No one was hospitalized, TMZ reported.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | June 28, 2007
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 76 million cases of food-borne illness occur each year in the United States. Summer is the time when the likelihood of food poisoning increases. More people are picnicking, barbecuing and enjoying the warm weather. But the heat isn't good for some foods, especially salads and meats. Best advice from Dr. Carolyn O'Connor: Cool it down. What causes food poisoning? Food poisoning is caused by bacteria or toxins in contaminated food.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | August 23, 1994
It happens every summer, sure as checkered tablecloths, pitchers of lemonade and pickup softball games. The idyllic setting of a country picnic or the spontaneous fun of a backyard cookout is tempered by someone getting food poisoning.Although rarely fatal, food poisoning can pose serious immediate health problems, and a miserable time for its sufferers. It also isn't relegated to the warm-weather months only. Still, with some simple precautions, the risk of contracting food poisoning -- at a summer picnic or Thanksgiving dinner -- can be dramatically reduced.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 19, 1997
After an outbreak of food poisoning linked to fresh basil or basil products such as pesto, customers of Sutton Place Gourmet stores who recently purchased such items are being urged to return them or throw them away.Four Montgomery County residents and two visitors from out of state became ill after eating products bought at stores in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs of Washington, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said yesterday.They became infected with the cyclospora parasite, which causes diarrhea, loss of appetite, stomach cramps and fever.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | July 26, 1993
Crab meat, rice and chili. It's hard to think of them as suspects in a whodunit.But they were in Anne Arundel County this year. Three outbreaks of restaurant food poisoning sickened 54 people, and detective work by health inspectors implicated the crab meat, rice and chili.They all had human accomplices who were the real culprits. In each outbreak, careless mistakes by food handlers allowed bacteria to contaminate the food, inspectors believe.Similar violations of basic sanitation triggered most of the 49 reported outbreaks of illness at Baltimore-area food establishments during the past three years.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | April 6, 1992
At least seven Orioles apparently were hit by food poisoning after Saturday's exhibition game in Washington, but everyone was expected to be OK for today's season opener.One of those affected was Opening Day opening-day starter Rick Sutcliffe, and Rick Dempsey, since cut from the roster, was hospitalized for five hours early yesterday morning. Both made it to yesterday's workout."We think it was the sandwiches we ate before the game in D.C.," said manager John Oates. "Three coaches [Cal Ripken Sr., Dick Bosman and Greg Biagini]
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | June 27, 2013
What ever happened to the good old days when the worst things we had to fear on the Fourth of July were traffic jams and wayward fireworks? According to the Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline, this year's top threat is food poisoning by nasty E. coli and salmonella bugs lurking in hamburgers and hot dogs at millions of backyard barbecues.  The Hotline's advice is to grill them longer and hotter. Of course, they don't bother to mention that the high-temperature grilling that kills the bugs also forms lots of cancer-causing compounds.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa | July 7, 2012
Celebrity couple Stacy Keibler and George Clooney suffered food poisoning after eating at a restaurant in Italy this week, according to TMZ . Keibler and Clooney dined at a restaurant in Cernobbio, Italy on July 4, TMZ's sources report, and became sick soon after. "Finally had a bad meal in Italy, our whole dinner party got food poisoning #ohwell at least I'm still in Italy," Keibler tweeted the next day. No one was hospitalized, TMZ reported.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 22, 2012
It's farmers' market time, and all those fruits and vegetables seem so fresh. But they aren't necessarily clean. Like supermarket produce, these local and even organic items need a wash before eating, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics , a professional education and advocacy group. The group and the food giant ConAgra are reminding everyone that one in six Americans get sick annually from food-borne pathogens. About 3,000 people die every year from food poisoning.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | April 30, 2012
Orioles closer Jim Johnson, who hasn't pitched since April 22 and spent four days in the hospital last week with food poisoning, said he threw a second bullpen session Sunday and is ready to get back into a game. “It seems like it has been a long time,” Johnson said. “But I feel fine. I feel like I am back to where I need to be.” Johnson said he threw a bullpen session Sunday - his second since returning to the team on Friday - and he felt good enough to tell manager Buck Showalter that he was ready to pitch.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
After four nights at Saint Agnes Hospital, Orioles reliever Jim Johnson was finally released Friday morning after a severe case of food poisoning. Johnson, who has converted 15 straight save opportunities dating to last season, acknowledged the experience was frustrating and frightening. "A little of both, depending on the time," Johnson said. "It was pretty bad. " Doctors conducted various tests to rule out specific illnesses, and eventually, food poisoning - including when and where - was pinpointed.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | April 7, 2012
Lefty Tsuyoshi Wada (elbow) will pitch in extended spring training on Monday (against the Minnesota Twins' minor-league camp in Fort Myers, Fla.) and on March 14th in Port Charlotte, Fla. (against Tampa Bay Rays camp). If all goes well, he'll likely go to a minor-league affiliate and pitch on March 19. Showalter said he'd like for Wada to throw at least 90 pitches twice. He could then be ready to return to the Orioles. Whether he comes back as a starter or reliever, Showalter said, depends on how Wada is throwing and how the big-league rotation has fared.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | October 19, 1993
Pay attention to the "Safe Handling Instructions" now appearing on meat and poultry. They could save your life.The instructions describe basic food handling practices that have been promoted for years, both to commercial food interests and to folks preparing food at home. But don't take them lightly.They are your personal line of defense against the same kinds of bacteria that produced illness and death from undercooked hamburger across the nation.These classic habits are being reinforced as a stopgap measure to protect you from food poisoning, while the U.S. Dept.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 30, 2010
From the Real Estate Wonk blog: Here's a heartfelt plea in light of the recent spate of carbon monoxide deaths: Don't become the next statistic. CO can kill when appliances that burn fuel -- gas, oil, wood, etc. -- are used improperly or stop working well, or when a car is left to idle in an enclosed space, the Environmental Protection Agency says. Because it's odorless, the only warning you'll get is the symptoms that develop as you're being poisoned. "At moderate levels, you or your family can get severe headaches, become dizzy, mentally confused, nauseated, or faint.
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