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By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Under the government's new food-labeling regulations, consumers can be confident that the words on the label accurately reflect what's in the package, Dr. David A. Kessler, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, said yesterday at a news conference announcing the long-awaited proposals.But some of the proposed rules might not survive. Representatives of the food industry say they aren't happy with definitions of terms such as "low fat" and "light." And they say the FDA has underestimated the economic impact the label changes would have on their industry.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Baltimore's food truck industry will be able to petition Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration for additional places to sell their fares, under a bill approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation calls on the Department of General Services to create new "food truck zones," while also allowing the mobile vendors to operate on streets throughout the city as long as they adhere to meter restrictions, said Babila Lima, a special assistant who is guiding the process for the city.
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NEWS
By Regina Nuzzo and Regina Nuzzo,Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
No longer satisfied by three meals a day, Americans have become accustomed to noshing whenever hunger hits. On any given day, about a quarter of Americans skips breakfast and one in eight skips lunch, but 90 percent treat themselves to a snack, according to the International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association. In 2002, a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 86 percent of Americans admit to eating between meals on any given day. On average, Americans eat about two snacks daily -- a frequency mostly unchanged since the first CDC survey in 1971.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
TIC Gums in Harford County is perhaps the biggest privately owned player in an invisible part of the food industry. It's not chewing gum, though the company does get some visitors who assume that's what it makes. The name refers to a different kind of gum - the type known as hydrocolloids, which hold the ingredients in your ranch dressing together and influence the way food feels in your mouth. The natural additives give many products their texture and consistency. "Just about anything you buy in the grocery store needs some level of it," said Greg Andon, the company's president.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 3, 2000
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS. N.J. -Unilever NV, the world's second-largest food company, has offered to buy Bestfoods for $18.3 billion in cash, an unsolicited bid that the U.S. food company rejected as inadequate. Bestfoods, maker of Hellmann's dressings and Skippy peanut butter, said Unilever offered $66 a share yesterday and in April bid $61 to $64. Unilever, a British-Dutch company that makes Lipton teas and Q-Tip swabs, couldn't be reached for comment. Unilever has been buying well-known brands it can market world-wide, spending $2.6 billion last month for SlimFast diet foods and Ben & Jerry's ice creams.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
The sale of the former Parks Sausage Co. plant in Park Heights to Philadelphia-based Dietz & Watson Inc. should be consummated Monday, a state economic development official said late yesterday."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
It's 8 a.m. Do you know where your taste buds are?If you're one of those dozen or so people at Martin Gillet & Co. Inc., in Highlandtown, whose tasting skills are on record as acute, you'd better have them in the lab, ready to sample a sesame-ginger salad dressing, or a mayonnaise sauce that's deeply redolent of horseradish.And if everything comes together, you just might find a product that will take off into the stratosphere, as the company's Parmesan Pepper salad dressing did in 1985.Josie Cooper, vice president, research and development, remembers that day: "I was working on two products for two different people, and I thought, these would taste good together."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 2000
In a transaction that will create the world's most profitable food company, Philip Morris, the parent of Kraft Foods, announced yesterday that it would buy Nabisco Holdings, the food company that makes and markets Oreo cookies, Ritz Crackers, and other classic packaged foods, for $14.9 billion. In addition, Nabisco Group Holdings, the parent of Nabisco Holdings, said that once it completes the sale of its food business to Philip Morris, it has agreed to be acquired by the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. for $9.8 billion.
NEWS
March 20, 1999
The U.S. Postal Service has extended its annual Harvest for the Hungry Food Drive through Wednesday.Letter carriers around the state will pick up canned and perishable food left at residential mailboxes for a drive to benefit food pantries throughout Maryland. The donations will be distributed by the Maryland Food Bank.Bill Ewing, executive director of the food bank, said local food banks rely increasingly on public donations such as those collected during the drive because donations from the food industry no longer are sufficient.
NEWS
August 10, 1999
Ronald Frank Little Sr., 58, manager in food industryRonald Frank Little Sr., a food industry manager, died Wednesday after suffering a heart attack at his Catonsville office. He was 58 and lived in Monrovia, Frederick County.Mr. Little managed Safeway supermarkets in Frederick and Rockville from 1962 to 1990. Since 1991, he had been space allocation manager for Metro Food Stores.Born in Lexington, Ky., where he graduated from high school, he was a hospital corpsman in the Navy from 1958 to 1962.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | July 2, 2013
I don't think about food, except in the sense that when my kids are hungry, they need it fast. I know that's bad. My poor planning often means running to the freezer to dig out chicken nuggets or fish sticks or a pizza to pop into the oven or turning to a box of macaroni and cheese to anchor a meal in 15 minutes or less. I frequently feel guilty about this Pavlovian response both from a bad nutrition standpoint and from the voice in the back of my head coming from my stepmother who thinks feeding children anything but organic everything borders on child abuse and banishes to the back of her pantry the food we bring for the duration of our visits.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
A good deed can be as simple as giving a few coins or donating used clothing. But Gaithersburg resident Brett Meyers has taken the role of good Samaritan one step further, feeding families by turning waste into nourishment. Meyers, who has spent most of his career in the food industry, founded the organization Nourish Now in May 2011, feeding the hungry with unused fresh food from restaurants and caterers. "I worked at Panera Bread and other delis where a lot of food would get wasted at the end of each night," Meyers said.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | August 21, 2012
One of the latest tech startups to get a footing in Baltimore is Foodem , a website started by a University of Maryland College Park grad a few years ago that aims to build a transparent marketplace for commercial food buyers and distributors. Kash Rehman, the founder of Foodem, has been on both sides of the equation in the food industry: he's worked for a small food distributor in Maryland and he's also run his own restaurant in College Park. Here's what Rehman, 35, learned along the way. As a restaurant buyer, he needed to spend an hour by phone comparing wholesale prices for food (think chicken tenders)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The sizzle echoed through the halls of the Center of Applied Technology North in Severn, emanating from the school's culinary arts baking and pastry lab, where it was joined by a tempting aroma. Normally, a restaurant kitchen would be responsible for such sounds and smells, but this day it was students and the Culinary Institute of America. Former staff from the Culinary Institute of America were instructing students as part of "Teaching with the CIA," a day of culinary education for Washington-area students interested in careers in the food service and hospitality industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
These posts and articles were interesting when I starred them. Now I'm not so sure. What do you think? Hey, if you send an email to richard.gorelick@baltsun.com I'll put you in my Google Plus Baltimore Diner Circle and then you can see these fun and intersting articles when they're at their peak. Of course you'll have to sign up for Google Plus. If you're so inclined, please put Google Plus Baltimore Diner Circle in the subject line. (This is something you have to tell Millennials.)
EXPLORE
By Mary Medland | July 8, 2011
It is a wet day in Carroll County — not too welcoming. But in the kitchen of Pete Truby's Sykesville house, the scenario is considerably cozier. For starters, there are his dogs — a beagle named Molly and a vizsla known as Murphy — who enthusiastically greet a reporter and photographer. Samples of chocolates are set out on his kitchen island, while Truby works on a new batch on the stove. Truby is the brains behind Salazon Chocolate, a two-year-old line of organic, fair-trade, dark chocolate that has carved out its niche by featuring natural sea salt.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | November 19, 2006
AACC offers lecture on business budgets Anne Arundel Community College will offer a lecture from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. tomorrow in Room 242 at the Career Center, 101 College Parkway, Arnold. "Funding Your Business and Preparing a Budget and Pro forma Financial Statements" will teach how to manage a successful budget. The cost is $10 general admission and free to AACC students and employees. Reservations are required. Information: 410-777-2066 or www.aacc.edu/esi. Seminar's focus will be marketing The Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce will offer a seminar from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Small Business Development Center, 2660 Riva Road, Suite 200. It will be presented by Hollis Minor of The Minor Group.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 24, 2006
What are prospects for my shares of Kraft Foods, especially with the likelihood of Altria Group spinning off its majority interest in the company? - V.T., via the Internet Some recent investors in the nation's largest packaged food company are saying "cheese." Behind their smile is the fact that their shares are up 24 percent this year, after last year's 21 percent decline. The stock, though, isn't much above the June 2001 initial public offering price of $31 per share. With strong earnings in the second quarter on improved revenue from Eastern Europe and Latin America, Kraft (KFT)
NEWS
June 2, 2011
If you are sending a message to Americans about what we should be eating, it makes more sense to entice us with a plate rather than a pyramid. Today, First Lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack followed that logic when they unveiled MyPlate, the federal government's latest healthy eating icon. Previous attempts abound; the 20-year-old food pyramid alone has had more makeovers than the "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. " The new color-coded plate does not exactly make you want to chow down and seems to play down familiar American staples like meat and potatoes, yet it is easy to read and understand.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | April 1, 2011
Working with food isn't a job for sissies. One must be innovative, artistic, competitive, patient, flexible and competent. The hours are long and the competition stiff. Sacrifice? Required. Taking risks? Also required. How does one succeed against such odds? Four female standouts in the industry share their stories on how they got in and why they stay. Sugunya Lunz , executive chef at The Kings Contrivance Restaurant After a long day at work, Sugunya Lunz finds comfort in a simple bowl of cooked noodles.
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