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Food Fight

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NEWS
By Laura Vozella | laura.vozella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 11, 2010
Just three months after Milan opened its doors, billing itself as a restaurant-lounge "where food meets fashion," it seems a few more introductions are in order: Milan, meet Little Italy. And Little Italy, meet what could be the future. The old city neighborhood that's been known to split bitterly over bocce court lighting has turned its feisty spirit on the sleek newcomer. Complaining that Milan is more nightclub than restaurant, attracting noisy crowds and employing outside promoters, a group of neighbors has petitioned the city not to renew Milan's liquor license.
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January 24, 2012
As the Presidential Primary season heats up, I am often both confused and amazed that my party, the Republican Party, continues to shoot itself in the foot (sorry for the violent metaphor) with a constant barrage of misstatements and missteps. Whether it be Gingrich's attack on Romney's capitalism, Santorum's desire to help black's get off of assistance, or Romney's minions turning what was a relatively civil campaign about the difference between President Obama's and Democrat's vision versus the Republican vision for America, into what is digressing into a food fight, I am constantly amazed at how we can step in it and snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.
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NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | September 7, 1995
MINNIE BING, a retired bookkeeper, offered a radical suggestion the other night at a town meeting on Medicare: Quit the partisan bickering. "It's going to take a lot of work, Republicans and Democrats," she told Rep. Roger Wicker, the freshman Republican who represents this town just south of Memphis. "We have to be one family, not a split family."As Congress returns to work this week, there is no sign that either party is listening to voters like Minnie Bing. Instead, they are both running advertising campaigns -- the Democrats on TV, the Republicans on radio -- that blame the other side for abandoning Medicare.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
As a Little Italy neighbor and Harbor East property owner, I'm saddened a "food fight" has begun in my community ("Little Italy group asks board to revoke Milan liquor license," April 12). I've watched the Milan renovation for months and am delighted with the outcome. Recently I attended a networking event and was astounded by the décor and ambiance. However, this venue could abuse the neighborhood by attracting rowdy crowds, playing loud music and creating traffic problems.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
The parents of students at Wilde Lake High School who went to the press ("School offered $30 for names," The Sun, Jan. 10) with the story of the food fight should be ashamed of the example they have set for their children. They have taught them not to address things directly, but rather to go to the press with their grievances. Neither the food fight nor the "aftermath" was significant or newsworthy events at Wilde Lake High School. I have two sons, a junior and a senior in the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
Hey, Baltimore, food fight! Nope, not the kind where you throw food around a room, just onto a stove. Food Fight is the name of a series that will premiere next spring on the Food Network. Each week, the series will tape a show from a restaurant in a U.S. city, pitting two teams of two local cooks against one another. The cooks will be given a surprise "regional specialty" (brush up on your crab recipes, dearie). They can zip over to a nearby supermarket to pick up $20 worth of additional ingredients.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
It's a food fight! But don't pick up that lemon cream pie.Instead, pick up some broccoli, or a whole grain roll. And don't throw it, eat it.The Maryland Division of the American Cancer Society is sponsoring the 4th annual Great American Food Fight tomorrow to promote awareness of foods and health practices that can help reduce the risk of developing cancer."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
A lunchroom food fight at a Howard County high school got so out of hand that the principal took an unusual step - promising a cash reward to anyone who would name names. Wilde Lake High School Principal Restia Whitaker offered $30 for information on who participated in the December incident, which officials said quickly escalated to an unsafe, not to mention messy, situation. It "was not just food being thrown. There were water bottles, trays and utensils," school system spokeswoman Patti Caplan said yesterday.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer and Richard Marks | April 30, 2008
Jean Ziegler, the United Nations special rapporteur for the right to food, recently raised blood pressures by dubbing biofuels "a crime against humanity" because they divert grains from food to fuels. This summer, the Group of Eight summit in Japan will attempt to address the global food crisis. And just yesterday, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon said he plans to establish a task force to tackle that crisis and avert "social unrest on an unprecedented scale." How to make sense of all of this?
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1996
Long before the huge crowds arrived at the Maryland State Fair yesterday morning, a band of hardy gourmands and amateur chefs toted their casserole dishes and rolls of aluminum foil into Timonium as if they were the very weapons of war.Indeed, it was war -- a food fight of the first order -- the Spam Cooking Contest.Among the 20 entries were Green Eggs and Spam, Rootin'-Tootin' Spam Loaf, Rack O' Spam on a Bed of Pringle's, Italian Spam Pie, Spam Breakfast Burritos, Spam and Apple Strudel and Yosemite Spam Frittata.
NEWS
By Laura Vozella | laura.vozella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 11, 2010
Just three months after Milan opened its doors, billing itself as a restaurant-lounge "where food meets fashion," it seems a few more introductions are in order: Milan, meet Little Italy. And Little Italy, meet what could be the future. The old city neighborhood that's been known to split bitterly over bocce court lighting has turned its feisty spirit on the sleek newcomer. Complaining that Milan is more nightclub than restaurant, attracting noisy crowds and employing outside promoters, a group of neighbors has petitioned the city not to renew Milan's liquor license.
NEWS
August 22, 2009
Color me shocked, too, when I heard of Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's opposition to President Obama's health care plan. Not because of his quirky views on alternatives to a public option but because his exercise of free speech could cost his company a whole lot of money. When the nation's chief granola-eater and avatar of environmentally friendly farming comes out against a plan that's likely supported by a majority of the arugula-and-endive-eating liberal Democrats who flock to his stores, in part because they pride themselves on holding progressive views, Mr. Mackey's mind has got to be a long way from his bottom line.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer and Richard Marks | April 30, 2008
Jean Ziegler, the United Nations special rapporteur for the right to food, recently raised blood pressures by dubbing biofuels "a crime against humanity" because they divert grains from food to fuels. This summer, the Group of Eight summit in Japan will attempt to address the global food crisis. And just yesterday, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon said he plans to establish a task force to tackle that crisis and avert "social unrest on an unprecedented scale." How to make sense of all of this?
NEWS
January 20, 2008
The parents of students at Wilde Lake High School who went to the press ("School offered $30 for names," The Sun, Jan. 10) with the story of the food fight should be ashamed of the example they have set for their children. They have taught them not to address things directly, but rather to go to the press with their grievances. Neither the food fight nor the "aftermath" was significant or newsworthy events at Wilde Lake High School. I have two sons, a junior and a senior in the school.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
A lunchroom food fight at a Howard County high school got so out of hand that the principal took an unusual step - promising a cash reward to anyone who would name names. Wilde Lake High School Principal Restia Whitaker offered $30 for information on who participated in the December incident, which officials said quickly escalated to an unsafe, not to mention messy, situation. It "was not just food being thrown. There were water bottles, trays and utensils," school system spokeswoman Patti Caplan said yesterday.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | March 11, 2007
Chris Richards selected a grilled flank steak with chimichurri sauce, grit cake with bacon and artichokes and Tomato Capote. Emica Boutilier held her plate out for a serving of arugula salad topped with orange fennel vinaigrette. "The salad is wonderful," said Boutilier, as she rustled through the arugula leaves with a fork. "I'm so excited. It wasn't made with iceberg lettuce." The salad wasn't the only dish that diners were gushing over in the McDaniel College cafeteria last week. Richards and Boutilier joined hundreds of other people who flooded the Englar Dining Hall during an Iron Chef Competition.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
As a Little Italy neighbor and Harbor East property owner, I'm saddened a "food fight" has begun in my community ("Little Italy group asks board to revoke Milan liquor license," April 12). I've watched the Milan renovation for months and am delighted with the outcome. Recently I attended a networking event and was astounded by the décor and ambiance. However, this venue could abuse the neighborhood by attracting rowdy crowds, playing loud music and creating traffic problems.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fax machine in The Sun's Washington bureau made its familiar whine, then produced a unique, unsigned missive:"Please stop lying about school lunches," the fax-sender wrote by hand. "Thank you."In the hysteria that has passed for debate on the Republican proposal to trim the school lunch program, this note, sent by a follower of conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, was a mild salvo.At least this critic said please and thank you.The usual rhetoric in this debate has been unduly harsh even by the nasty partisan standards of modern Washington.
NEWS
By Kathy Manweiler and Kathy Manweiler,McClatchy-Tribune | December 20, 2006
Food, friends and family. Putting them all together during the holidays can be a recipe for conflict. Some people just can't resist voicing unwanted opinions and advice on loved ones' weight and eating habits. Others are subtle saboteurs who wave too many temptations under the noses of people who are trying not to gain extra pounds during this season. It's a sticky situation for many who find themselves on the defensive about what is - or isn't - on their plates. And food fights can spoil what should be a happy occasion.
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