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Food Deserts

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
More than a third of Baltimore neighborhoods don't have ready access to healthy foods, leaving one in five residents to rely on high-fat, high-calorie meals from corner stores and carryout restaurants, a new assessment shows. City, academic and nonprofit officials have worked for years to eliminate so-called "food deserts," but they say the latest data from Johns Hopkins University researchers shows the scope of the problem and where good food options are most urgently needed. "You can see on the ground that a lot of areas are lacking," said Holly Freishtat, who became Baltimore's first food policy director about two years ago. "The next step for the map is to use it for policy.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | July 31, 2014
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan blamed Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown for Baltimore's "food deserts" Thursday, suggesting that the O'Malley-Brown administration's tax policies led the the recent demise of the Stop Shop Save grocery chain. In a statement released by the campaign, Hogan minimized the impact of Thursday's opening of a new, 67,000-foot ShopRite store in Howard Park. “ShopRite expanding in Baltimore is a good thing, but I would have hoped this major corporation would have chosen to locate in one of Baltimore City's food deserts where unemployment and poverty are far higher than the state average," Hogan said.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 15, 2009
P rogressive, health-conscious people up in Michigan launched an effort to bring fresh fruits and vegetables to Detroit's "food deserts" - large sections of town with plenty of liquor stores and fast-food places but few or no supermarkets or farmers' markets. A small fleet of vendor-style trucks now bring produce to people who have neither well-stocked food stores in their neighborhoods nor cars for schlepping groceries from distant markets. A $75,000 loan from the Michigan Economic Development Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
An inner-city Baltimore grocery chain is closing its stores, delivering a blow to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's efforts to eliminate the city's "food deserts" and provide more residents with healthy eating options. An official of Stop Shop Save, a minority-owned business that has been a Baltimore mainstay since 1978, confirmed Tuesday that it had already closed five stores and will close the last one — on Harford Avenue in Oliver — leaving neighborhoods across the city without a convenient grocery store.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | July 31, 2014
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan blamed Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown for Baltimore's "food deserts" Thursday, suggesting that the O'Malley-Brown administration's tax policies led the the recent demise of the Stop Shop Save grocery chain. In a statement released by the campaign, Hogan minimized the impact of Thursday's opening of a new, 67,000-foot ShopRite store in Howard Park. “ShopRite expanding in Baltimore is a good thing, but I would have hoped this major corporation would have chosen to locate in one of Baltimore City's food deserts where unemployment and poverty are far higher than the state average," Hogan said.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a high temperature near 45 degrees. Tonight's forecast calls for mostly clear skies and a low temperature around 30 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Girl, 13, found dead in Darley Park section of Baltimore : A 13-year-old girl was found slain Sunday evening in the Darley Park neighborhood of northeast Baltimore, police reported.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Baltimore's spending panel on Wednesday approved a deal to turn 75 vacant lots in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood into a large urban farm. In a five-year deal, the Board of Estimates approved a $100 yearly lease to a partnership of two organizations - Strength to Love II and Big City Farms - for use of 75 properties in the 1800 blocks of Lorman and Kavanaugh streets for a 1.5-acre farm. "They're setting out to find farmers who are willing to work on city-owned vacant land," Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
June 4, 2011
Anyone who wheels around downtown Baltimore knows that finding street parking can be a hassle. So one of the smart things the city did last week when it calmed the food truck kerfuffle was to set aside five downtown parking zones to accommodate the area's fledgling fleet of food trucks. The five zones — the east side 500 block of St. Paul Place and St. Paul Street, the south side of the 1900 block of East Monument Street, the south side of the 500 block of West Baltimore Street, the west side of the 300 block of South Charles Street and the north side of the 500 block of East Fayette Street — give the food trucks guaranteed spots between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
Residents of two Baltimore neighborhoods that lack supermarkets will soon be able to order their groceries through a free delivery system that operates with the click of a mouse from the library. The new Virtual Supermarket Project, city officials' latest attempt to solve Baltimore's long-standing history of neighborhoods with little access to healthful foods, offers laptops where residents can order groceries online from Santoni's Super Market in Highlandtown and pick them up the next day at the Orleans Street or Washington Village library branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By Tom Albright, Holly Freishtat and Robert S. Lawrence | November 14, 2011
In Baltimore City, 1 in 8 families with young children are "food insecure," and 20 percent of all residents live in poverty. More than half a million Marylanders get help affording food through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In fact, SNAP, or what we used to call food stamps, enrolled 45 million people nationwide this year, a leap from 25 million in 2008. Shouldn't SNAP participants in Baltimore - or other cities - be able to spend their SNAP dollars on nutritious, locally produced food?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Baltimore's spending panel on Wednesday approved a deal to turn 75 vacant lots in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood into a large urban farm. In a five-year deal, the Board of Estimates approved a $100 yearly lease to a partnership of two organizations - Strength to Love II and Big City Farms - for use of 75 properties in the 1800 blocks of Lorman and Kavanaugh streets for a 1.5-acre farm. "They're setting out to find farmers who are willing to work on city-owned vacant land," Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Sara Kaplaniak | July 11, 2012
Recently, my neighborhood convened to discuss whether to host a weekly, open-air farmers market for producers from within 50 miles of our Central Pennsylvania town. After ironing out concerns about traffic, zoning and location, we decided to give it a go. I'm proud of my community for committing to its support for local farmers and promoting food that travels fewer miles to reach our plates. I'm also aware of how lucky we are to have this option for easily obtaining fresh, nutritious food.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gardening held little appeal to Stacey Watkins, a Baltimore special-education teacher, until an organization that helps keep her classroom in books put out a call for help with an urban planting project. She soon found her manicured hands could do wonders with dirt. Within a few hours last week, Watkins, who dug unencumbered by garden gloves, had planted straight rows of broccoli, kale, cauliflower and all manner of herbs in a vacant, long-neglected lot along Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a high temperature near 45 degrees. Tonight's forecast calls for mostly clear skies and a low temperature around 30 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Girl, 13, found dead in Darley Park section of Baltimore : A 13-year-old girl was found slain Sunday evening in the Darley Park neighborhood of northeast Baltimore, police reported.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
More than a third of Baltimore neighborhoods don't have ready access to healthy foods, leaving one in five residents to rely on high-fat, high-calorie meals from corner stores and carryout restaurants, a new assessment shows. City, academic and nonprofit officials have worked for years to eliminate so-called "food deserts," but they say the latest data from Johns Hopkins University researchers shows the scope of the problem and where good food options are most urgently needed. "You can see on the ground that a lot of areas are lacking," said Holly Freishtat, who became Baltimore's first food policy director about two years ago. "The next step for the map is to use it for policy.
NEWS
By Tom Albright, Holly Freishtat and Robert S. Lawrence | November 14, 2011
In Baltimore City, 1 in 8 families with young children are "food insecure," and 20 percent of all residents live in poverty. More than half a million Marylanders get help affording food through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). In fact, SNAP, or what we used to call food stamps, enrolled 45 million people nationwide this year, a leap from 25 million in 2008. Shouldn't SNAP participants in Baltimore - or other cities - be able to spend their SNAP dollars on nutritious, locally produced food?
NEWS
By Sara Kaplaniak | July 11, 2012
Recently, my neighborhood convened to discuss whether to host a weekly, open-air farmers market for producers from within 50 miles of our Central Pennsylvania town. After ironing out concerns about traffic, zoning and location, we decided to give it a go. I'm proud of my community for committing to its support for local farmers and promoting food that travels fewer miles to reach our plates. I'm also aware of how lucky we are to have this option for easily obtaining fresh, nutritious food.
NEWS
June 4, 2011
Anyone who wheels around downtown Baltimore knows that finding street parking can be a hassle. So one of the smart things the city did last week when it calmed the food truck kerfuffle was to set aside five downtown parking zones to accommodate the area's fledgling fleet of food trucks. The five zones — the east side 500 block of St. Paul Place and St. Paul Street, the south side of the 1900 block of East Monument Street, the south side of the 500 block of West Baltimore Street, the west side of the 300 block of South Charles Street and the north side of the 500 block of East Fayette Street — give the food trucks guaranteed spots between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
Residents of two Baltimore neighborhoods that lack supermarkets will soon be able to order their groceries through a free delivery system that operates with the click of a mouse from the library. The new Virtual Supermarket Project, city officials' latest attempt to solve Baltimore's long-standing history of neighborhoods with little access to healthful foods, offers laptops where residents can order groceries online from Santoni's Super Market in Highlandtown and pick them up the next day at the Orleans Street or Washington Village library branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
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