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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Elijah Knauer bounds into S'ghetti Eddie's as if on a mission, taking in the pinball, the family-style booths and — oh man — the spot on the menu that mentions the thing that begins with an "ice" and ends with a "cream. " "Oooooh, they have thick and creamy milkshakes," he enthuses. "Mommy, what's a malted?" Eli is a restaurant critic, but he's also 10 years old, a recent graduate of the fourth grade at Baltimore County's Oakleigh Elementary. He's a so-called kid foodie — a "koodie" — with spunk, a budding palate and a review blog that to the amazement of even his own mother, is drawing worldwide attention.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Angelo J. Nopulos, co-owner for nearly 30 years of the popular Double T Diner in Catonsville, where people from all walks of life rubbed elbows with society swells, judges, businessmen, politicians and celebrities, died Saturday of a heart attack at his Arbutus home. He was 98. The son of a barber and homemaker who were Greek immigrants, Angelo James Nopulos was born in Pittsburgh and raised in San Diego and Weirton, W.Va., where he dropped out of school in the ninth grade. "He was kind of a free spirit, and he kind of wandered the country helping out family members who owned various restaurants before the war," said a daughter, Diane Puigdomenech of New Port Richey, Fla. In those pre-war years, Mr. Nopulos held various jobs and worked as a welder, driver, salesman, bookkeeper and "even a bouncer," wrote his nephew, Ted Barris, in an online tribute.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
As long as I've been writing restaurant criticism, first as a freelancer for the City Paper and later for The Baltimore Sun, people have always been curious about my qualifications. Some of them were actually nice about it. Now that I'm The Sun's restaurant critic, I expect those questions to continue, and I know, too, that there are assumptions about the background of a restaurant critic. In my case, those assumptions are seldom correct. First, I was not the kind of kid who spent numberless days in my mother's kitchen, learning how to worry a sauce, roll out dough, or discern baking apples from snacking apples.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Elijah Knauer bounds into S'ghetti Eddie's as if on a mission, taking in the pinball, the family-style booths and — oh man — the spot on the menu that mentions the thing that begins with an "ice" and ends with a "cream. " "Oooooh, they have thick and creamy milkshakes," he enthuses. "Mommy, what's a malted?" Eli is a restaurant critic, but he's also 10 years old, a recent graduate of the fourth grade at Baltimore County's Oakleigh Elementary. He's a so-called kid foodie — a "koodie" — with spunk, a budding palate and a review blog that to the amazement of even his own mother, is drawing worldwide attention.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Angelo J. Nopulos, co-owner for nearly 30 years of the popular Double T Diner in Catonsville, where people from all walks of life rubbed elbows with society swells, judges, businessmen, politicians and celebrities, died Saturday of a heart attack at his Arbutus home. He was 98. The son of a barber and homemaker who were Greek immigrants, Angelo James Nopulos was born in Pittsburgh and raised in San Diego and Weirton, W.Va., where he dropped out of school in the ninth grade. "He was kind of a free spirit, and he kind of wandered the country helping out family members who owned various restaurants before the war," said a daughter, Diane Puigdomenech of New Port Richey, Fla. In those pre-war years, Mr. Nopulos held various jobs and worked as a welder, driver, salesman, bookkeeper and "even a bouncer," wrote his nephew, Ted Barris, in an online tribute.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Rose M. Cernak, longtime owner of Obrycki's , the East Baltimore bar and crab house whose crab seasoning and jumbo crab cakes earned it undying loyalty from locals as well as actors, sports figures and politicians, died Sunday of cancer at her HarborView condominium. She was 79. Rose Marani, the daughter of an Italian immigrant and first-generation American, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton in a Potomac Street rowhouse. After graduating in 1948 from the old Patterson Park High School, Mrs. Cernak entered Strayer's Business College.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
NEW YORK -- If you don't remember Andrei Medvedev as the No. 6 player in the world in 1993, you may remember him as the comedian who claimed U.S. Open officials were trying to poison him here two years ago by serving such bad food.You'd hardly know him today."I realized, especially during this year, that without putting your mind into tennis -- 99.9 percent of your mind into tennis -- you can't be successful," he said after beating Jean-Philippe Fleurian, 6-2, 6-0, 6-1, yesterday. "I have had much less fun off the court, but now I'm having much more fun on the court."
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | May 22, 2002
NEW YORK -- As James Villas stood in the majesty of Le Cirque preparing to address the crowd of well-wishers gathered to celebrate the publication of his memoir, Between Bites, he was a man in his element. Villas was turned out in a magnificent vested brown suit and yellow bow tie. His sandy complexion seemed to emit the same burnished glow as the chandeliers hanging in the L'Orangerie room in the fabled Manhattan restaurant. In the crowd was his mother, Martha Pearl Villas, who is in her 80s and still bakes her own biscuits.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | October 2, 1991
Michael Rork, a towering, silver-haired chef made even taller by his stiff, snowy-white toque, seems like the adventuring Gulliver in a world of walk-in freezers, stainless steel counter tops and six-burner stoves. In the Harbor Court Hotel's kitchen, where pots and pans seem Lilliputian when he stands over them, he's got a big order to fill.He's cooking and feeding more than 70 food critics this week -- eaters who'll nit-pick and quibble among themselves about the richness of his sauces, the colors of his fish, the texture of his vegetables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
Anthony Bourdain is famous for his ground-shifting "Kitchen Confidential" book, for his fearless food travels on his "No Reservations" cable show, and for being a charming loudmouth. His friend Eric Ripert is famous foremost for being a great chef, and, more recently, for his own frequent seatings at the "Top Chef" judges' table. But would two white-haired chefs sitting around talking make for a satisfying evening at the theater? That's what people wanted to know when the Hippodrome announced "An Evening with Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert," the first in a planned series of food-and-wine events the theater intends to make part of its expanded programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
As long as I've been writing restaurant criticism, first as a freelancer for the City Paper and later for The Baltimore Sun, people have always been curious about my qualifications. Some of them were actually nice about it. Now that I'm The Sun's restaurant critic, I expect those questions to continue, and I know, too, that there are assumptions about the background of a restaurant critic. In my case, those assumptions are seldom correct. First, I was not the kind of kid who spent numberless days in my mother's kitchen, learning how to worry a sauce, roll out dough, or discern baking apples from snacking apples.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Rose M. Cernak, longtime owner of Obrycki's , the East Baltimore bar and crab house whose crab seasoning and jumbo crab cakes earned it undying loyalty from locals as well as actors, sports figures and politicians, died Sunday of cancer at her HarborView condominium. She was 79. Rose Marani, the daughter of an Italian immigrant and first-generation American, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton in a Potomac Street rowhouse. After graduating in 1948 from the old Patterson Park High School, Mrs. Cernak entered Strayer's Business College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
Anthony Bourdain is famous for his ground-shifting "Kitchen Confidential" book, for his fearless food travels on his "No Reservations" cable show, and for being a charming loudmouth. His friend Eric Ripert is famous foremost for being a great chef, and, more recently, for his own frequent seatings at the "Top Chef" judges' table. But would two white-haired chefs sitting around talking make for a satisfying evening at the theater? That's what people wanted to know when the Hippodrome announced "An Evening with Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert," the first in a planned series of food-and-wine events the theater intends to make part of its expanded programming.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | May 22, 2002
NEW YORK -- As James Villas stood in the majesty of Le Cirque preparing to address the crowd of well-wishers gathered to celebrate the publication of his memoir, Between Bites, he was a man in his element. Villas was turned out in a magnificent vested brown suit and yellow bow tie. His sandy complexion seemed to emit the same burnished glow as the chandeliers hanging in the L'Orangerie room in the fabled Manhattan restaurant. In the crowd was his mother, Martha Pearl Villas, who is in her 80s and still bakes her own biscuits.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
NEW YORK -- If you don't remember Andrei Medvedev as the No. 6 player in the world in 1993, you may remember him as the comedian who claimed U.S. Open officials were trying to poison him here two years ago by serving such bad food.You'd hardly know him today."I realized, especially during this year, that without putting your mind into tennis -- 99.9 percent of your mind into tennis -- you can't be successful," he said after beating Jean-Philippe Fleurian, 6-2, 6-0, 6-1, yesterday. "I have had much less fun off the court, but now I'm having much more fun on the court."
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | October 2, 1991
Michael Rork, a towering, silver-haired chef made even taller by his stiff, snowy-white toque, seems like the adventuring Gulliver in a world of walk-in freezers, stainless steel counter tops and six-burner stoves. In the Harbor Court Hotel's kitchen, where pots and pans seem Lilliputian when he stands over them, he's got a big order to fill.He's cooking and feeding more than 70 food critics this week -- eaters who'll nit-pick and quibble among themselves about the richness of his sauces, the colors of his fish, the texture of his vegetables.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
In the news foodroutes.org This site from the FoodRoutes Network, a nonprofit organization that supports community-based food systems, features reasons to buy locally and tells where to find produce grown close to home. Plug in your ZIP code and what you're looking for, and the site will find farms, farmers' markets, co-ops, stands and restaurants. Seeking cabbage in North Baltimore? The site comes up with nine sources, though some might be farther than you want to drive. Rohina Phadnis French food -- Author and former food critic Daniel Young will appear from noon to 2 p.m. Feb. 17 at Greetings and Readings in the Hunt Valley Towne Center to sign copies of his latest cookbook, The Bistros, Brasseries and Wine Bars of Paris: Everyday Recipes From the Real Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
One of the Baltimore-area restaurant filmed for an upcoming episode of "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives" has added a second location inside the White Marsh Mall. Rodrigo Albarran has opened a second location of R&R Taqueria in the food court at the White Marsh Mall. The first location, inside an Elkridge Shell Station, opened in 2009 and caught on big time last year, earning a coveted spot Washington Post Food Critic Tom Sietsema's influential Fall Dining Guide and attracting the attention of the popular Food Network program hosted by Guy Fieri.
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