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NEWS
By Charles Campbell | February 14, 2011
Have American agricultural policies indirectly led to revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East? The one pivotal feature of the civil unrest throughout the world is food — and there is a growing population of underclass everywhere, balanced against a world food supply that cannot support them. This is the key: If the masses are starving because they can't afford food, then it doesn't matter what form of government is in place — revolutions will occur. U.S. policy is at the forefront of the causes of world hunger, in large part because of our misguided biofuels program.
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NEWS
By Charles Campbell | February 14, 2011
Have American agricultural policies indirectly led to revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East? The one pivotal feature of the civil unrest throughout the world is food — and there is a growing population of underclass everywhere, balanced against a world food supply that cannot support them. This is the key: If the masses are starving because they can't afford food, then it doesn't matter what form of government is in place — revolutions will occur. U.S. policy is at the forefront of the causes of world hunger, in large part because of our misguided biofuels program.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2008
ROME - Resolving the global food crisis could cost as much as $30 billion a year, and wealthier nations are doing little to help the developing world face the problem, U.N. officials said yesterday. At a U.N. food summit attended by dozens of world leaders, Jacques Diouf, head of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, opened the meeting by sharply criticizing wealthy nations that he said were cutting back on agriculture programs for the world's poor and ignoring deforestation - while spending billions on carbon markets, subsidies for farmers and biofuel production.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | July 20, 2008
The farmer drove a diesel-powered hay baler in a circuit around his field, followed by his son on a clattering machine that grabbed the bales with metal fingers. Edward F. Stanfield, 77, and his son, Edward B. Stanfield, 49, have followed this oil-inspired choreography for decades on their 600-acre farm in the Randallstown area of Baltimore County. Like farmers around the world, they grow their hay, corn and soybeans with petrochemical fertilizers and pesticides, harvest them with diesel combines, pack them with oil-based plastic and ship them in diesel trucks.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - With grain stores dwindling, the scourge of HIV/AIDS decimating an already weakened population and farmers fearing another grim harvest, the food crisis in southern Africa has worsened and now threatens more than 14 million people, United Nations officials announced yesterday. James T. Morris, the U.N. special envoy for humanitarian needs, said that a new assessment had found 14.4 million people in Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland are in dire need of food assistance - up from previous estimates of 12.8 million.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1998
Don't step on those ants. They may be little farmers, and more like us than you thought.Scientists say more than 200 species of ants have evolved agricultural practices much like ours, using composting, fertilizers and herbicides to produce the mushroom and yeast crops they grow in dark, sponge-like subterranean galleries.New research by University of Maryland biologist Ulrich Mueller has revealed that the ants have also survived food crises by adopting fungal crops grown by other ant species, or even by domesticating new varieties from the "wild."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | July 20, 2008
The farmer drove a diesel-powered hay baler in a circuit around his field, followed by his son on a clattering machine that grabbed the bales with metal fingers. Edward F. Stanfield, 77, and his son, Edward B. Stanfield, 49, have followed this oil-inspired choreography for decades on their 600-acre farm in the Randallstown area of Baltimore County. Like farmers around the world, they grow their hay, corn and soybeans with petrochemical fertilizers and pesticides, harvest them with diesel combines, pack them with oil-based plastic and ship them in diesel trucks.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 31, 2003
LEKU, Ethiopia - The eyes of the boy who is crumpled on the plastic mattress tell his story. They float aimlessly in their sockets, as if just focusing them would expend his last drop of energy. His head bobs like a doll's. His arms and legs are swollen, a sign, the doctors here say, that in these days of hunger his body has no choice but to feed on itself. His medical chart lists his weight in blue ink: 10.1 kilograms - about 22 pounds - a healthy size if he were a 1-year-old. But this boy - Muse is his name - is 5. He is the latest arrival on a recent afternoon at a feeding center in the Great Rift Valley, one of the regions hit hardest in a food crisis sweeping Ethiopia.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1994
SEOUL, South Korea -- A desperate food shortage has pushed most North Koreans to the brink of starvation, fueling refugee flight to China and the beginnings of popular protests, a North Korean defector said yesterday.In a tearful account of the grim life inside the world's most secretive, isolated Communist nation, Yo Man Chol, a 48-year-old former security force captain, said that people are dying in the fields and that support for Kim Il Sung, the authoritarian regime's leader, is rapidly declining.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
Millions of people around the world are in danger of starving because of a combination of events that experts say will make food much more expensive and scarce for at least the next 10 years. This crisis demands early action by Congress to provide at least $600 million in supplemental food aid to help meet the challenge of a 41 percent increase in global food costs over the last year. Congressional committees are expected to begin weighing the request next week. For more than 800 million people around the world facing chronic malnutrition, surging commodity and energy prices have made the danger of starvation real.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | June 19, 2008
Before leaving the University of Notre Dame for a two-week trip to Ethiopia and Kenya, I was concerned about the rising food prices worldwide. Having grown up in Hong Kong eating rice each day, I was particularly worried by the threefold increase in the price of rice - the staple food for about 3 billion people worldwide. My concern took on a new intensity when I arrived in East Africa and began touring projects supported by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In Africa, the rise in global food prices doesn't mean forgoing a night out on the town or passing up a pair of shoes on sale.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2008
ROME - Resolving the global food crisis could cost as much as $30 billion a year, and wealthier nations are doing little to help the developing world face the problem, U.N. officials said yesterday. At a U.N. food summit attended by dozens of world leaders, Jacques Diouf, head of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, opened the meeting by sharply criticizing wealthy nations that he said were cutting back on agriculture programs for the world's poor and ignoring deforestation - while spending billions on carbon markets, subsidies for farmers and biofuel production.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 24, 2008
Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have an opportunity to make history, and give the United States and the world several years of progressive leadership that could extend the life of the planet. As of today, they're squandering it. Smug political pundits keep telling us that a Clinton-Obama ticket will never happen -- they can't stand each other, supposedly, or Bill Clinton won't approve the partnership -- and so the campaign for the nomination goes on, with attacks increasing the likelihood of a fractured party and the possibility of a John McCain victory in November.
NEWS
April 22, 2008
Rising population strains food supply The Sun's recent editorial urging that America take the lead in addressing the world food crisis ("Feeding the world," April 16) cited numerous reasons for the growing problem of world hunger, including rapid economic growth in China and India, the diversion of cropland to production of biofuels and the rising costs for fertilizer and farm fuels. But it didn't mention the biggest reason of all: overpopulation. Humanity is adding 70 million people to its numbers every year, virtually all of them in the world's poorest nations.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
Millions of people around the world are in danger of starving because of a combination of events that experts say will make food much more expensive and scarce for at least the next 10 years. This crisis demands early action by Congress to provide at least $600 million in supplemental food aid to help meet the challenge of a 41 percent increase in global food costs over the last year. Congressional committees are expected to begin weighing the request next week. For more than 800 million people around the world facing chronic malnutrition, surging commodity and energy prices have made the danger of starvation real.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 10, 2004
BEIJING - The World Food Program, saying it has nearly run out of rations for North Korea, warned yesterday of an intensifying crisis. Because of a shortage of food from donor nations, only 100,000 of the 6.5 million vulnerable children, pregnant women and elderly people it usually feeds in North Korea are receiving aid from the United Nations agency. This represents the most serious shortfall in aid since North Korea began its less-than-complete cooperation with international organizations in the 1990s, and comes at a time when the bellicose and secretive regime in Pyongyang is threatening to develop nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 24, 2008
Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have an opportunity to make history, and give the United States and the world several years of progressive leadership that could extend the life of the planet. As of today, they're squandering it. Smug political pundits keep telling us that a Clinton-Obama ticket will never happen -- they can't stand each other, supposedly, or Bill Clinton won't approve the partnership -- and so the campaign for the nomination goes on, with attacks increasing the likelihood of a fractured party and the possibility of a John McCain victory in November.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | June 19, 2008
Before leaving the University of Notre Dame for a two-week trip to Ethiopia and Kenya, I was concerned about the rising food prices worldwide. Having grown up in Hong Kong eating rice each day, I was particularly worried by the threefold increase in the price of rice - the staple food for about 3 billion people worldwide. My concern took on a new intensity when I arrived in East Africa and began touring projects supported by Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services. In Africa, the rise in global food prices doesn't mean forgoing a night out on the town or passing up a pair of shoes on sale.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 31, 2003
LEKU, Ethiopia - The eyes of the boy who is crumpled on the plastic mattress tell his story. They float aimlessly in their sockets, as if just focusing them would expend his last drop of energy. His head bobs like a doll's. His arms and legs are swollen, a sign, the doctors here say, that in these days of hunger his body has no choice but to feed on itself. His medical chart lists his weight in blue ink: 10.1 kilograms - about 22 pounds - a healthy size if he were a 1-year-old. But this boy - Muse is his name - is 5. He is the latest arrival on a recent afternoon at a feeding center in the Great Rift Valley, one of the regions hit hardest in a food crisis sweeping Ethiopia.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - With grain stores dwindling, the scourge of HIV/AIDS decimating an already weakened population and farmers fearing another grim harvest, the food crisis in southern Africa has worsened and now threatens more than 14 million people, United Nations officials announced yesterday. James T. Morris, the U.N. special envoy for humanitarian needs, said that a new assessment had found 14.4 million people in Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland are in dire need of food assistance - up from previous estimates of 12.8 million.
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