Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFood Coloring
IN THE NEWS

Food Coloring

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Eileen Ambrose | March 28, 2012
Update:  Starbucks has responded. Linda Mills, a spokeswoman from Starbucks, says: “Starbucks has a goal to minimize artificial ingredients in our products. And the strawberry base that we use  does have a cochineal extract, a common dye used in the food industry. It's in yogurt and fruit juices and a number of consumer products. It helps us move away from artificial  ingredients from our products.”  An online petition has been launched by a South Carolinian against Starbucks' red food coloring in its Strawberry drinks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Eileen Ambrose | March 28, 2012
Update:  Starbucks has responded. Linda Mills, a spokeswoman from Starbucks, says: “Starbucks has a goal to minimize artificial ingredients in our products. And the strawberry base that we use  does have a cochineal extract, a common dye used in the food industry. It's in yogurt and fruit juices and a number of consumer products. It helps us move away from artificial  ingredients from our products.”  An online petition has been launched by a South Carolinian against Starbucks' red food coloring in its Strawberry drinks.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ross Grant and Ross Grant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2001
In the early 1990s, news reports suggested that ketchup was under challenge as America's national condiment. Dollar for dollar, sales of salsa were exceeding ketchup. A decade later, ketchup's popularity is stronger than ever - thanks to green and purple versions that appeal to kids, as well as to gourmet sauces like banana, mango or green tomato ketchup aimed at higher-end consumers. Ketchup has been one of the most stable foods on the market. But it seems to be turning on its head. Besides green and purple food coloring, the sauce is being infused with ginger, maple syrup, jalapeno or prickly pear cactus, as a new generation of microbrewed ketchup shows up in specialty stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Jackie of Baltimore wants the recipe for a red velvet cake: "Two years ago at Christmas, I had the chance to taste this cake but I can't find a recipe anywhere. " — Baltimore Sun recipe finder, 1990 Hang in there, Jackie. If you managed to wait 20 years or so, thousands and thousands of red velvet recipes are now yours for the clicking. But why bake? You can now to grab a red velvet cake in the bakery of your favorite supermarket. And while you're there, you can load up your cart with Ben & Jerry's Red Velvet Cake Ice Cream and red velvet tea from Republic of Tea. Red velvet is thriving on restaurant menus, on and off the dessert page.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
As spring approaches, I thought we'd do a fun consult with the folks at McCormick & Co. on things you didn't know you could do with food coloring. Here are a few things kids ages 7-12 might enjoy creating. (McCormick, of course, recommends using McCormick Assorted Food Color): * Funny Putty. Start with a cup of white glue in a plastic container. Add 1 cup liquid starch a little at a time, stirring constantly, along with any color of the food coloring, until the mixture is rubbery. Store in an airtight container.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | January 14, 2009
What are we going to eat and drink Sunday night as we watch the Ravens play the Pittsburgh Steelers? This is the question that is consuming Baltimore eaters this week. There are several game-day possibilities: bowing to superstition, choosing local flavors or going purple. The superstition route is one Gary Scher travels. His eating habits bring the Ravens good luck, he thinks. When, for example, he watches the Ravens on television in his Ellicott City home, Scher always pops open a can of Coors in sync with the kickoff.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | March 13, 2002
Keen on green McCormick & Co. has recipes that will bring green to your table on St. Patrick's Day: To make green beer, add 5 drops of green food coloring to 12 ounces of beer. Turn nondairy whipped topping green with 12 drops of green and two drops of yellow food coloring. For other tips, log on to www.mccormick.com or call 800-632-5847. Saving books The International Association of Culinary Professionals and KitchenAid have teamed up to identify, restore and preserve endangered cookbooks.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
Cora Burgan of Frankford, Del., requested a recipe that her mother made called a Missouri Red Cake. "It was a big hit on many occasions. I have a cousin who is ill and would love to have this cake, but I cannot find my mother's recipe. Hope you can help." Betty Ozbun of Rogers, Ark., responded with a recipe and a brief note. "I hope this is, or is nearly, the recipe Cora Burgan is looking for." Missouri Red Cake Serves 16 1/2 cup shortening 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 eggs 2 ounces red food coloring 2 tablespoons cocoa 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup buttermilk 1 tablespoon white vinegar Cream first 5 ingredients.
FEATURES
By Cathy Barber | April 14, 1993
* Home economists for Baker's recommend baking the cake a day ahead of time before decorating; it will toughen slightly and be easier to work with. If time is tight, cool the cake and put it in the freezer for 30 to 45 minutes before decorating.* Slice the rounded top off the cake to make it flat. If the cake already is relatively flat, flip it and frost the bottom.* To cut shapes, gently saw the cake with a long serrated knife.* Brush off cake crumbs with a soft pastry brush or with your hand, gently, before you begin to frost.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 27, 2001
IF THE RAVENS win tomorrow, all home repairs will go on hold for several days of major hootin' and tootin'. But if the Ravens lose to the Giants, a funk will settle over this town, and domestic productivity will really suffer. Faucets will continue to drip. Doors will still rub. Walls will go unpainted. Weekend chores will be ignored. That is my Super Bowl prediction, that the outcome of the game will influence the amount of repairs completed on the home front. After a Ravens win, we townsfolk will be Delirious Maximus for a couple of days but then will get back to our normal work habits.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
As spring approaches, I thought we'd do a fun consult with the folks at McCormick & Co. on things you didn't know you could do with food coloring. Here are a few things kids ages 7-12 might enjoy creating. (McCormick, of course, recommends using McCormick Assorted Food Color): * Funny Putty. Start with a cup of white glue in a plastic container. Add 1 cup liquid starch a little at a time, stirring constantly, along with any color of the food coloring, until the mixture is rubbery. Store in an airtight container.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | January 14, 2009
What are we going to eat and drink Sunday night as we watch the Ravens play the Pittsburgh Steelers? This is the question that is consuming Baltimore eaters this week. There are several game-day possibilities: bowing to superstition, choosing local flavors or going purple. The superstition route is one Gary Scher travels. His eating habits bring the Ravens good luck, he thinks. When, for example, he watches the Ravens on television in his Ellicott City home, Scher always pops open a can of Coors in sync with the kickoff.
FEATURES
By Anne Byrn and Anne Byrn,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 28, 2006
Halloween and other holidays used to make me panic because, with young children, I was supposed to turn out clever cupcakes and other treats without a blink. This is why I think so many folks turn to store-bought, because they just don't have a trick (so to speak) up their sleeve for trick-or-treat party food. These cupcakes are as adorable to look at as they are scrumptious to eat. Imagine rich devil's food cake, smeared with butter-cream frosting and topped with a crunchy chocolate treat in the shape of a spider.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2003
With all the effort your favorite little ghosts and goblins put into dressing up and trekking from house to house on Halloween, it seems a shame not to quench their thirst with a punch that fits the occasion. Fortunately, there are plenty of easy ways to add a creepy factor to a good fall punch. Here are a few, culled from experience, as well as from an abundance of suggestions in magazines and on the Web: Freeze ice cubes with raisins in them - they'll look like bugs. Get a good supply of chewy fruit worms.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
Cora Burgan of Frankford, Del., requested a recipe that her mother made called a Missouri Red Cake. "It was a big hit on many occasions. I have a cousin who is ill and would love to have this cake, but I cannot find my mother's recipe. Hope you can help." Betty Ozbun of Rogers, Ark., responded with a recipe and a brief note. "I hope this is, or is nearly, the recipe Cora Burgan is looking for." Missouri Red Cake Serves 16 1/2 cup shortening 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 eggs 2 ounces red food coloring 2 tablespoons cocoa 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup buttermilk 1 tablespoon white vinegar Cream first 5 ingredients.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | March 13, 2002
Keen on green McCormick & Co. has recipes that will bring green to your table on St. Patrick's Day: To make green beer, add 5 drops of green food coloring to 12 ounces of beer. Turn nondairy whipped topping green with 12 drops of green and two drops of yellow food coloring. For other tips, log on to www.mccormick.com or call 800-632-5847. Saving books The International Association of Culinary Professionals and KitchenAid have teamed up to identify, restore and preserve endangered cookbooks.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,sun staff | March 28, 1999
What is it about a brightly colored egg that brings joy to the heart and makes us think of spring? Decorating eggs is one of the most beloved of Easter rituals, with everyone in the family getting into the act.Kids love creating funky works of art with commercial dye kits and the stickers that come in them. But contrary to what some moms think, there's no such thing as an ugly Easter egg -- only one more suited to an egg hunt than the dining room centerpiece. For decorating the house, adults and older children can dye their own, more artistic eggs.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2003
With all the effort your favorite little ghosts and goblins put into dressing up and trekking from house to house on Halloween, it seems a shame not to quench their thirst with a punch that fits the occasion. Fortunately, there are plenty of easy ways to add a creepy factor to a good fall punch. Here are a few, culled from experience, as well as from an abundance of suggestions in magazines and on the Web: Freeze ice cubes with raisins in them - they'll look like bugs. Get a good supply of chewy fruit worms.
FEATURES
By Ross Grant and Ross Grant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2001
In the early 1990s, news reports suggested that ketchup was under challenge as America's national condiment. Dollar for dollar, sales of salsa were exceeding ketchup. A decade later, ketchup's popularity is stronger than ever - thanks to green and purple versions that appeal to kids, as well as to gourmet sauces like banana, mango or green tomato ketchup aimed at higher-end consumers. Ketchup has been one of the most stable foods on the market. But it seems to be turning on its head. Besides green and purple food coloring, the sauce is being infused with ginger, maple syrup, jalapeno or prickly pear cactus, as a new generation of microbrewed ketchup shows up in specialty stores.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 27, 2001
IF THE RAVENS win tomorrow, all home repairs will go on hold for several days of major hootin' and tootin'. But if the Ravens lose to the Giants, a funk will settle over this town, and domestic productivity will really suffer. Faucets will continue to drip. Doors will still rub. Walls will go unpainted. Weekend chores will be ignored. That is my Super Bowl prediction, that the outcome of the game will influence the amount of repairs completed on the home front. After a Ravens win, we townsfolk will be Delirious Maximus for a couple of days but then will get back to our normal work habits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.