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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
Maryland winters can be particularly ferocious or quite benign. The winter of 1779, which earned the sobriquet of "The Hard Winter," left icebound ships in the Chesapeake Bay loaded with desperately needed supplies for George Washington's Continental Army, shivering in winter quarters at Morristown, N.J. The coldest winter in the past 100 years was the winter of 1917-1918, which roared into Maryland, dropping three times the normal amount of snow and...
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By HILLEL W. COHEN | November 3, 2005
Will preparations for pandemic flu incorporate important lessons from Hurricane Katrina? President Bush unveiled a $7.1 billion plan Tuesday that concentrates on expanding production and stockpiles of vaccine and antiviral medicine. It may still fall far short of what is needed. The Bush plan has prioritized protection of pharmaceutical company profits with broad protection against liability suits but did not suggest how low-income families without prescription medicine coverage will pay for medications.
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By DAN BERGER | May 2, 1991
Stop the presses! Paul Tsongas is running.The U.S. is the great power in the world and is begging its bankers in Tokyo and Bonn for lower interest so that it can go on living the fantasy a little longer.Iraq wants to sell oil and assets for such humanitarian necessities as food and medicine. You have Saddam Hussein's word on that.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Yesterday, the Americans arrived in Liberia but in small numbers. A helicopter took seven Marines to Monrovia, the capital of the West African country that seems intent on tearing itself apart. The Marines were sent to prepare the way for humanitarian aid to be distributed to thousands of refugees who are desperate for food and medicine. More than 1,000 civilians have been killed in two months of fighting, which has forced hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee to the capital and caused critical shortages of food, water and medicine.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
U.N. relief trucks enter MOSTAR with food and medicine, a U.N. spokeswoman said.NATO's political committee agreed in BRUSSELS to take tougher action to get supplies to Muslims trapped in Mostar.Bosnia pleaded at THE HAGUE for the World Court's protection, accusing Serbia and its ally Montenegro of genocide, rape and torture.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The United States said yesterday that it had new evidence showing that President Saddam Hussein had spent money to build a sprawling amusement park to entertain his political followers instead of feeding hungry Iraqis.In a report intended to convince other governments to retain tough economic sanctions against Iraq, the State Department said the entertainment complex was detected in aerial photographs."Despite its claims that the people of Iraq are dying due to a lack of food and medicine, Saddam Hussein doesn't hesitate to spend hundreds of millions of dollars for the entertainment of Baath Party officials and cadres," said James P. Rubin, the State Department spokesman.
NEWS
May 22, 1996
THE U.N. DEAL with Iraq represents concessions by that country's dictator, Saddam Hussein. He is accepting outside monitoring of his country's economy that he formerly rejected for infringing sovereignty. The deal will allow food and medicine to reach Iraq's people suffering from the sanctions meant to cripple their rulers. This soothes the conscience of the West. Far from undermining the boycott of Iraq, the arrangement makes sanctions easier to maintain.Under the agreement, Iraq would sell oil for the first time in nearly six years.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 28, 2000
WASHINGTON - House leaders agreed yesterday to allow sales of U.S. food and medicine to Cuba, paving the way for the most extensive relaxation of trade restrictions against Fidel Castro's communist government in four decades. The measure was pushed hard by farm-state legislators eager to secure Cuba as a customer for U.S. agricultural businesses, and trade authorities expect it to generate tens of millions worth of U.S. exports. Its immediate significance is more symbolic than economic, Cuba specialists said.
NEWS
February 12, 1992
The humanitarian U.S. airlift of food and medicine to the former Soviet Union is justified, say most callers to SUNDIAL, by a vote of 242 to 97 (71 percent vs. 28 percent) out of 339 responses.Nearly three-fourths of the callers, or 253 of 339, say the airlift is important to convey a message of peace, while 86 callers (25 percent) say otherwise.Most callers (256 of 334, or 76 percent) also say more effort should be aimed at the U.S. poor, and 78 callers (23 percent) disagree."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- A senior Russian official admits "formidable problems" in distributing tons of humanitarian aid pouring into the former Soviet Union this week but dismisses as "nonsense" reports that the charitable goods were being stolen.Alexander HD, deputy chairman of the Russian government's Humanitarian Aid Commission, said this week that strict controls, including surprise checks, were being carried out as cargo planes continued to arrive with food and medicine from the United States and Europe.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
Maryland winters can be particularly ferocious or quite benign. The winter of 1779, which earned the sobriquet of "The Hard Winter," left icebound ships in the Chesapeake Bay loaded with desperately needed supplies for George Washington's Continental Army, shivering in winter quarters at Morristown, N.J. The coldest winter in the past 100 years was the winter of 1917-1918, which roared into Maryland, dropping three times the normal amount of snow and...
NEWS
June 30, 2000
ECONOMIC sanctions such as trade and travel embargoes rarely have the intended effect. Unilateral sanctions are the worst. Sanctions that work best are international in origin and pegged to reasonable demands that can be met in a brief time frame. They are best managed by the executive branch of government, which can adjust to changing circumstances. Laws passed by Congress last long after the circumstances that provoked them have changed. These are the principles against which to judge the deal reached among House Republican conservatives to remove one roadblock to increased exports to Cuba.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 28, 2000
WASHINGTON - House leaders agreed yesterday to allow sales of U.S. food and medicine to Cuba, paving the way for the most extensive relaxation of trade restrictions against Fidel Castro's communist government in four decades. The measure was pushed hard by farm-state legislators eager to secure Cuba as a customer for U.S. agricultural businesses, and trade authorities expect it to generate tens of millions worth of U.S. exports. Its immediate significance is more symbolic than economic, Cuba specialists said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The United States said yesterday that it had new evidence showing that President Saddam Hussein had spent money to build a sprawling amusement park to entertain his political followers instead of feeding hungry Iraqis.In a report intended to convince other governments to retain tough economic sanctions against Iraq, the State Department said the entertainment complex was detected in aerial photographs."Despite its claims that the people of Iraq are dying due to a lack of food and medicine, Saddam Hussein doesn't hesitate to spend hundreds of millions of dollars for the entertainment of Baath Party officials and cadres," said James P. Rubin, the State Department spokesman.
NEWS
By John Rivera | February 8, 1998
By inviting Pope John Paul II last month to Cuba, the last bastion of socialism in the Western hemisphere, President Fidel Castro took a calculated risk.For five days, he listened politely as John Paul, the "avenging angel" of anti-communism, repeatedly demanded freedom for Cuban citizens, the release of political prisoners and a greater role for the Catholic Church. The pope denounced Marxist-Leninist ideology and warned Cubans against embracing "false Messiahs," likely an oblique reference to the cult of Fidelismo.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Bureaucratic logjams, Iraqi foot-dragging and deep-seated distrust hobble the United Nations' oil-for-food deal with Iraq, prolonging the suffering of millions.A year after Iraq was allowed to begin selling limited amounts of oil to buy food and medicine, no one is satisfied -- not U.N. officials, who say it fails to eradicate the causes of Iraqi hunger and disease; not the Iraqi people, who complain of inadequate and poor quality supplies; and not the United States, which is widely blamed in the Arab world for Iraqi misery from sanctions imposed for the 1990 invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Yesterday, the Americans arrived in Liberia but in small numbers. A helicopter took seven Marines to Monrovia, the capital of the West African country that seems intent on tearing itself apart. The Marines were sent to prepare the way for humanitarian aid to be distributed to thousands of refugees who are desperate for food and medicine. More than 1,000 civilians have been killed in two months of fighting, which has forced hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee to the capital and caused critical shortages of food, water and medicine.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
ECONOMIC sanctions such as trade and travel embargoes rarely have the intended effect. Unilateral sanctions are the worst. Sanctions that work best are international in origin and pegged to reasonable demands that can be met in a brief time frame. They are best managed by the executive branch of government, which can adjust to changing circumstances. Laws passed by Congress last long after the circumstances that provoked them have changed. These are the principles against which to judge the deal reached among House Republican conservatives to remove one roadblock to increased exports to Cuba.
NEWS
May 22, 1996
THE U.N. DEAL with Iraq represents concessions by that country's dictator, Saddam Hussein. He is accepting outside monitoring of his country's economy that he formerly rejected for infringing sovereignty. The deal will allow food and medicine to reach Iraq's people suffering from the sanctions meant to cripple their rulers. This soothes the conscience of the West. Far from undermining the boycott of Iraq, the arrangement makes sanctions easier to maintain.Under the agreement, Iraq would sell oil for the first time in nearly six years.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Opening the first crack in the tight economic sanctions imposed on Iraq 5 1/2 years ago, the United Nations agreed yesterday to let Baghdad resume selling oil on the world market to help feed and care for a desperate civilian population.It was the first loosening of sanctions against Iraq since the invasion of Kuwait in 1990 and the Persian Gulf war the next year.Oil prices dropped, then rose again as the market reacted. Analysts predicted that the additional oil eventually would dampen prices for crude oil, perhaps resulting in lower prices at the gas pump.
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