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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. producers were unchanged in November for goods excluding food and energy, a sign that competition is keeping a lid on costs as the economy closes in on a record expansion, a government report showed yesterday."
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By Sloane Brown | April 5, 2012
Wedding Day: June 9, 2012 Her story: Carly Mistovich, 28, grew up Glen Rock, Pennsylvania. Her father, Ken Mistovich, is vice president at L&L Supply Corp., a brick company. Her mother, Lisa Mistovich, is a server and bartender for several catering companies in the area. Carly moved to Federal Hill six years ago for her job. She's the director of sales for Aramark food services at M&T Bank Stadium. His story: Greg Patronik, 29, grew up in Reisterstown. His father, Nick Patronik, owns Patron Services, Inc., a logistics company that's involved with importing and exporting cargo.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE . | October 19, 2005
Wholesale prices surged at a faster pace than consumer prices last month, the government reported yesterday, indicating that businesses are not passing on the full brunt of the energy price spike to customers. The Producer Price Index, which measures the prices received by producers of goods and services, jumped 1.9 percent in September, as energy costs rose 7.1 percent, the Labor Department reported. It was the biggest monthly increase since January 1990, when prices also increased 1.9 percent.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 6, 2008
The stock market didn't offer impressive returns in 2007. But one area of the economy had a comparatively banner year: milk. Yes, the price of milk and other goods, such as eggs or a tank of gasoline, grew at a rate that would make stock investors faint with joy. From the start of the year through November, fresh milk prices rose 23.2 percent, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Meanwhile, the S&P 500 returned 3.5 percent for the year; the Dow Jones industrial average did a bit better at 6.4 percent.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 29, 2004
Kevin MacKenzie of Perry Hall says (politely!) that I'm full of garbage, and of course he's right. Last Sunday's column on the continuing drop in the "core" inflation rate, he suggests, was based on academic nonsense that bears no relation to his life or any other aspect of reality. (Again, I'm paraphrasing. Mr. MacKenzie's language was far more cordial. Take note, e-mail ranters.) The column noted that consumer prices besides food and energy have barely budged since last year, which might signal a supply/demand imbalance and a weak economy blah, blah, boolah.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to factories, farmers and other producers fell as expected in October for the third time in five months as lower energy costs offset a jump in new car prices.The producer price index declined 0.1 percent last month, while the core rate of the PPI, which excludes often-volatile food and energy costs, was unchanged."There's no meaningful inflation out there," said Robert Dederick, a consulting economist at Northern Trust Co. in Chicago. The Federal Reserve "has nipped in the bud what was a worsening of inflation earlier this year," he said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- U.S. consumer prices rose in June at the slowest pace in seven months as energy prices posted the largest monthly decline in five years, the Labor Department said yesterday.The smaller-than-expected 0.1 percent increase in the consumer price index, down from a 0.3 percent increase in May, suggests that Federal Reserve policy-makers, who left interest rates unchanged at a policy meeting two weeks ago, might do the same when they next meet Aug. 20, some observers said."We have an economy that's well-balanced and performing at a very satisfactory pace," said Lynn Reaser, chief economist at Barnett Banks in Jacksonville, Fla.In most cases, the Fed prefers to move on bad inflation news rather than good economic reports.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Inflation poked up its head in February as U.S. consumer prices rose more than expected and earnings of American workers increased at the highest rate on record, a government report yesterday showed.The February Consumer Price Index rose 0.3 percent as higher costs for fresh vegetables and natural gas contributed to the increase, according to Department of Labor figures. A month earlier, the CPI, the government's main inflation gauge, rose only 0.1 percent.Average weekly earnings rose 2.4 percent last month, after adjustment for inflation and seasonal variations, following a revised decline of 1.7 percent the month before, the Labor Department said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A variety of fresh government statistics released yesterday showed that an economic slowdown, becoming more pronounced by the day, is helping to moderate the sting of inflation.Retail prices climbed three-tenths of 1 percent for the second consecutive month in February, the Labor Department reported, result that analysts considered in line with expectations that the inflation rate this year will be held to less than 3.5 percent.Prices are rising, "but very glacially," said Brian J. Fabbri, chief economist for Paribas Capital Markets in New York.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 10, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks declined yesterday as falling semiconductor orders hurt technology issues and a key inflation report failed to ease concern about the course of interest rates."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 21, 2007
The end of denial always requires a jarring encounter with reality. Mine came at the Giant, where a $4 gallon of milk made clear - in a way that somehow $3 gas hadn't - that forces pushing up consumer prices are aligned as they haven't been since the 1980s. A worldwide boom has driven up the costs of basics such as energy, food and metals as well as shipping capacity and smart workers. The computer-productivity and global-outsourcing trends that enabled a decade of low inflation seem to be running out of steam.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In his first public statements as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, Ben S. Bernanke told Congress yesterday that interest rates may have to move higher to curb inflation and that he expects home prices to level off or dip slightly, rather than drop precipitously. Testifying before the House Financial Services Committee, Bernanke said short-term interest rates are "still relatively low" and "some further firming of monetary policy may be necessary." That left little doubt that the Fed's policymaking group, the Open Market Committee, would raise rates for a 15th consecutive time, to 4.75 percent, when it meets March 27 and 28. Unlike his predecessor Alan Greenspan, who was famous for convoluted public testimony, Bernanke was clear, concise and brief.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE . | October 19, 2005
Wholesale prices surged at a faster pace than consumer prices last month, the government reported yesterday, indicating that businesses are not passing on the full brunt of the energy price spike to customers. The Producer Price Index, which measures the prices received by producers of goods and services, jumped 1.9 percent in September, as energy costs rose 7.1 percent, the Labor Department reported. It was the biggest monthly increase since January 1990, when prices also increased 1.9 percent.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 29, 2004
Kevin MacKenzie of Perry Hall says (politely!) that I'm full of garbage, and of course he's right. Last Sunday's column on the continuing drop in the "core" inflation rate, he suggests, was based on academic nonsense that bears no relation to his life or any other aspect of reality. (Again, I'm paraphrasing. Mr. MacKenzie's language was far more cordial. Take note, e-mail ranters.) The column noted that consumer prices besides food and energy have barely budged since last year, which might signal a supply/demand imbalance and a weak economy blah, blah, boolah.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. producers were unchanged in November for goods excluding food and energy, a sign that competition is keeping a lid on costs as the economy closes in on a record expansion, a government report showed yesterday."
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
The "I" word -- inflation -- rejoined the American economic lexicon yesterday when a government report showed April prices for consumer products and services rose at their fastest rate in nine years, prompting stocks to plummet on fears the Federal Reserve might raise interest rates soon.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped nearly 194 points, closing at just above 10,913. The yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury bond jumped to 5.92 percent -- the highest level since a year ago today.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- U.S. producer prices inched higher in September as food and energy costs rose at a slower pace, the government reported yesterday.A separate report indicated that retail sales broke out of a slump last month after a rare decline in August.The producer price index rose a smaller-than-expected 0.2 percent in September even though auto prices surged, the Labor Department said. Retail sales, meantime, bounced back from a revised 0.2 percent decline in August to post a larger-than-expected 0.7 percent rise in September, the largest gain in four months.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 21, 2007
The end of denial always requires a jarring encounter with reality. Mine came at the Giant, where a $4 gallon of milk made clear - in a way that somehow $3 gas hadn't - that forces pushing up consumer prices are aligned as they haven't been since the 1980s. A worldwide boom has driven up the costs of basics such as energy, food and metals as well as shipping capacity and smart workers. The computer-productivity and global-outsourcing trends that enabled a decade of low inflation seem to be running out of steam.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- U.S. wholesale sales rose in February at the fastest rate in almost three years, suggesting growth may accelerate in the months ahead as companies place new orders to maintain inventories, government figures showed yesterday.February's 2.1 percent increase in wholesale sales, up from a rise of 0.8 percent a month earlier, was the largest since August 1994, the Commerce Department said.Inventories, meanwhile, held steady at a $260.1 billion annual rate during February after rising 0.8 percent in January.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Inflation poked up its head in February as U.S. consumer prices rose more than expected and earnings of American workers increased at the highest rate on record, a government report yesterday showed.The February Consumer Price Index rose 0.3 percent as higher costs for fresh vegetables and natural gas contributed to the increase, according to Department of Labor figures. A month earlier, the CPI, the government's main inflation gauge, rose only 0.1 percent.Average weekly earnings rose 2.4 percent last month, after adjustment for inflation and seasonal variations, following a revised decline of 1.7 percent the month before, the Labor Department said.
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