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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 5, 2011
Dr. John J. Gibbs, a retired Food and Drug Administration research chemist, died of complications of a brain disorder, frontotemporal degeneration, March 27 at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. The former Timonium resident was 73. Born in Troy, N.Y., he was the son of Donald C. Gibbs and the former Mary Loretta McBride. He lived on Mount Royal Avenue in Baltimore and earned a chemistry degree at the College of William and Mary, where he was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
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NEWS
November 27, 1996
LOVE HIM or hate him -- and there are plenty of people in each category -- Dr. David Kessler departs after six years as head of the Food and Drug Administration with an enviable record of accomplishment. When he arrived at the agency, it was widely regarded as a paper tiger, a bureaucracy weighed down by lethargy and red tape. No one can say that now.The FDA is a significant player in the important debates about public health. In many cases, such as restrictions on children's access to cigarettes, it has sparked the debate.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
A standing joke around the well-appointed office suite of U.S. Army Maj. Gen. John C. Doesburg is that he was 4 inches taller when he enlisted 35 years ago. Considering the general's 350 parachute jumps - and the cumulative shock to his body meeting Earth - it is easy to see that the humor contains a large measure of admiration. Doesburg, commander of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, will retire today from the military. At 57, he takes with him the satisfaction of forming and directing a unit that dreamed up and built a new generation of war gadgetry - and of working to better shield American troops in Humvees in Iraq.
NEWS
By Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
The medical questions about the Army's use of Factor VII, its one-time wonder drug, have largely been resolved by the scientific evidence: Yes, it is potentially dangerous. No, it doesn't seem to work. But to critics of the drug's use, some practical questions remained. Such as: Why was an obscure and extremely expensive hemophilia drug embraced by Army leaders as a treatment for combat injuries? And why was it injected into thousands of wounded troops and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan despite a near-complete lack of evidence that it was safe or saved lives?
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration withdrew its opposition to legislation allowing doctors and nurses to dispense medical marijuana to patients through academic medical centers, raising prospects for passage this year. Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, the state secretary of health and mental hygiene, said Friday that the administration could support the bill but only if it gave the governor the "flexibility" to suspend the program if the federal government threatened legal action over what it still classifies as an illegal drug.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 5, 2011
Dr. John J. Gibbs, a retired Food and Drug Administration research chemist, died of complications of a brain disorder, frontotemporal degeneration, March 27 at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. The former Timonium resident was 73. Born in Troy, N.Y., he was the son of Donald C. Gibbs and the former Mary Loretta McBride. He lived on Mount Royal Avenue in Baltimore and earned a chemistry degree at the College of William and Mary, where he was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
NEWS
November 27, 1996
LOVE HIM or hate him -- and there are plenty of people in each category -- Dr. David Kessler departs after six years as head of the Food and Drug Administration with an enviable record of accomplishment. When he arrived at the agency, it was widely regarded as a paper tiger, a bureaucracy weighed down by lethargy and red tape. No one can say that now.The FDA is a significant player in the important debates about public health. In many cases, such as restrictions on children's access to cigarettes, it has sparked the debate.
NEWS
December 22, 2006
Did you know?--One in 1,000 Americans develops blood clots, or deep vein thrombosis, after traveling on long flights each year. - Food and Drug Administration
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