Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFood
IN THE NEWS

Food

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Megan H. Ryan and Megan H. Ryan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2002
Nowadays, it is a rare treat to see the word coddies on a menu, but not so long ago this uniquely Baltimore food was as close as your corner store, malt shop or confectionery. Coddies are not to be confused with cod cakes. While recipes for coddies vary, a coddie can be best described as a hand-formed, gently seasoned mashed-potato-and-cracker mixture that is always deep-fried and traditionally served between two saltine crackers topped with yellow mustard. It contains little or no cod. Served at room temperature, today's coddies are made slightly larger than in the past, hanging over the sides of the saltines by one-half inch all around.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the age of smartphones and tablets, delivering restaurant food can be more than just taking calls, making the stuff, bagging it and sending a guy out in a rundown Toyota. On the fourth floor of a refurbished broom factory in Canton, a room full of young men in T-shirts, polo shirts and Orioles caps work at a long table laden with computers on OrderUp, a food service with a technology twist. They're busy with the further development of the technology that their company combined with logistical calculation to create a formula that's delivering in 36 markets from Maryland to California.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
This weekend's Polish Festival will include food stands, a staple in ethnic showcases. The treats served are easy to carry around so you don't miss out on any of the festivities, but don't think their portability takes away from their authenticity. Coordinator Maryann Fredrick says that these foods are true to tradition and will entice people to come to the inner harbor. The menu she organized includes such favorites as: • Kielbasa (Polish Sausage): This recipe calls for pork, more pork, and a fair amount of garlic.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
The Daily Meal, a food-and-dining website, has published list of the 10 Best College Towns for Food. Baltimore didn't make the list, but Baltimore isn't a college town. So, no hard feelings. The top ten college towns for food were 1) Berkeley, Calif., Ann Arbor, Mich., Princeton, N.J., Oxford, Miss., Chapel Hill, N.C., Burlington, Vt., Eugene, Ore., Ithaca, N.Y., Boulder, Colo., and Madison, Wis. Here's that list on TheDailyMeal.com. Did your old college town show up?
NEWS
July 23, 2013
Baltimore County is poised to pass laws to keep food trucks from operating within 300 feet of restaurants ("Balt. Co. Planning Board passes new food truck laws," July 18). That would be a mistake. Food trucks create jobs, serve delicious food to happy customers and provide "eyes on the street" that keep neighborhoods safe. Further, establishing proximity restrictions between food trucks and restaurants is unconstitutional. Protecting businesses from competition is not a legitimate use of government power, which is why the Institute for Justice, the national law firm for liberty, challenges these regulations nationwide.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
The photo used in the recent article on food stamps showing a woman purchasing prepared food in individual serving containers illustrates the problem with the way food stamps are used ("Md. food stamp recipients worry about plans for cuts," Nov. 19). Considering the cost of individual servings of prepared food, most people could stretch their budgets further by buying raw ingredients in bulk. Supermarkets need to institute some form of guidelines on what can be purchased with food stamps before the government is forced to step in with costly and awkward regulations.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | January 7, 2011
Burke's Cafe, the downtown restaurant that closed last week, was so very Baltimore. You could get oyster stew or sour beef and know it would be precisely the way you remembered it. It was always open. Its menu was frozen in time. A late Sunday breakfast, with Bloody Marys, did not cost $53, as I recently shelled out at a stylish venue in Woodberry. Burke's was not stylish. The terms "ceviche," "veal cheeks" and "confit" did not appear on its menu. What did appear? Potato pancakes with applesauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
The Scientific American blog network has a juicy looking collection of posts up on the subject of food and eating. The round-up is called Passions of Food . I have to admit, I love this stuff, especially the articles by anthropologists. Some of the posts were produced freshly for this round-up; others, like Bora Zivkovic's Do you love or Hate or Cilantro? , are from the archives, I've barely cracked the spine, but I'm looking forward to Krytal D'Costa on the culture of  coffee drinkers and Christie Wilcox on the myths of organic farming . Bt right now, though, I'm going to read D'Costa's Are We Ashamed of Lunch?
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Cardinal Tavern owner Larry Rohleder Jr. says Canton has responded well to his corner bar since its December 2011 opening. But, Rohleder said, customers weren't completely satisfied. "People kept telling us, 'I love this place, but you gotta serve food'," he said. Soon, they'll be getting it. Rohleder said that Cardinal Tavern will add a dining room and small bar on its currently unused second floor. The tavern is working on its menu design and concept with a restaurant consultant, Rohleder said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
  The folks at The Food Market have truffles on their mind -- black truffles, white truffles, black and white truffles together.  Chef Chad Gauss will be featuring those lovely truffles at 7 p.m. Thursday in a "One-Night Truffle Dinner. " The four-course menu, plus dessert, will be served in the Hampden restaurant's lower-level communal dining space, The Private Kitchen -- which we were just waiting for the right time to tell you existed. This is that time. The four-course menu includes a black-truffle Brussels sprouts Caesar salad, a soy and white truffle tuna tartare, black and white lobster tail with risotto and truffled red meat with potatoes and rosemary.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The Four Seasons Food Truck Tour is coming to Baltimore.    Designed as a showcase for its culinary programs and for the individual chefs at its hotel properties, the Four Seasons' mobile unit is pulling into Baltimore on Monday for a weeklong stay as part of an East Coast tour that began in Boston on Sept. 15. In Baltimore, the truck will feature "street food" creations from Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore chefs Oliver Beckert, the hotel's executive chef, Zack Mills, executive chef for the hotel's main restaurant Wit & Wisdom , and Dyan Ng, the hotel's pastry chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Some restaurants are hard to figure out. They present themselves as one thing and turn out to be another, or else they're in a continuing state of figuring themselves out. The cool thing about Guy Fieri's Baltimore Kitchen + Bar is how plainly it wears its big beefy heart on its distressed-denim sleeve. You'd have to go out of your way to not know what you're getting into at Guy Fieri's, one of three restaurants at the new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. And you'd have to have a heart made of stone not to respond, on some level, to its basic good cheer and basic American enthusiasm.
FEATURES
By Audrey A. Cockrum, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Friends of Great Kids Farm will host their Second Annual Fall Food and Jazz Festival on Oct. 11. The event will serve locally sourced food, wine and beer accompanied by the music of the Dunbar High School Jazz Band. The festival will also feature a culinary competition among City Schools' rising chefs. Celebrity judges will award prizes for the best dish. “Each of the five high school culinary training programs will be preparing a signature dish - featuring produce from the Farm - in partnership with a local restaurant,” said Chrissa Carlson, Friends of Great Kids Farm executive director.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Something about these chilly almost-autumn days makes us want to sip wine outdoors, watch a parade, browse a manicured garden, or, you know, get scared out of our wits. Fortunately, there are plenty of opportunities in the region for all of the above. Here are a few: Maryland Autumn Glory Festival You might have been to Garrett County in summer to swim in Deep Creek Lake and in winter to ski at Wisp, but maybe you haven't yet experienced it in fall. The Autumn Glory festival is a good reason to travel to Western Maryland for leaf-peeping, craft shows, live music and parades.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
The federal government plans to shift the cost of accepting food stamps to retailers in the coming weeks, a move that Baltimore officials and anti-hunger advocates said Tuesday could make it harder for some families to buy groceries. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and her administration are working with advocacy groups to inform merchants of the change and to help them prepare. About a third of the city's population relies on the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, known as food stamps.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 25, 2013
Moms are feeding their babies solid foods before their bodies are developed enough to handle it, a new study by the Centers For Disease Control has found. The American Academy of Pediatrics has long advised that babies don't get solid food until they are four to six months-old. But 40 percent of the nearly 1,300 mothers surveyed in the study said they introduced food before that. Babies are better developed at 4 to 6 months of age, including having the ability to hold their heads up and open their mouths for food.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
There are some widely shared opinions about the Ambassador Dining Room, the Indian restaurant that has operated on the ground level of the Ambassador apartment building since 1997. The first of them, which is nearly unanimous, is that the terrace is a knockout. Set at the back of the main dining room, it overlooks the lush and fragrant gardens behind the apartment building in Baltimore's Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood. It's good to be back here, under cover, sitting on a wide comfortable chair at your formally set table.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After three years mixing, bottling and boxing natural personal care products to be sold in local shops at their home in Annapolis, Robert and Zoe Benzinger are poised for bigger things. For the first time their company, eco-armour, will be among the exhibitors starting Wednesday at Natural Products Expo East 2014 in Baltimore, billed as the largest trade show on the East Coast devoted to goods made from ingredients found in nature treated with relatively little processing. The industry says sales of natural food for people and pets, diet supplements, and cosmetics and grooming products are growing about 8 percent a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Historically, the concept of the diner was fairly straightforward. No-frills food, quick service, huge menu, lots of coffee. In recent years, however, that definition has been expanded and tweaked, as chefs have embraced "upscale" diner food and Guy Fieri roamed the country, shining his "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" spotlight on restaurants that don't traditionally fill any of those shoes. The Weekender, a self-billed "country diner," appears to be one of this new breed of restaurant.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.