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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
News reports last week stated that several stainless steel plaques on Maryland's new World War II Memorial overlooking the Severn River and the Naval Academy near Annapolis, contained several glaring errors of fact or text.For instance, the date of the Japanese surrender was given as Sept. 6, 1945, rather than Sept. 2.A quote from President Franklin D. Roosevelt's historic war address to a joint session of Congress on Dec. 8, 1941, the day after Pearl Harbor was attacked, says, "a day which will live in infamy" rather than "a date which will live in infamy."
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NEWS
April 25, 2014
To those of you living in Harper's Choice, if you've already decided for whom you're voting in the village elections come Saturday, great; it's good to have convictions. But my sense is that most people don't have strong convictions about the CA board and can't tell much of a difference between one candidate and the other. On paper, pretty much every candidate sounds good, wouldn't you agree? But in person, how people act, function, collaborate and solve problems - well, that's a very different story.
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NEWS
By Robert F. Patrick and Robert F. Patrick,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2000
The state's second-highest court overturned the felony drug conviction of a Salisbury man yesterday, with the Eastern Shore community of Delmar playing a pivotal role in the decision. Maryland's Court of Special Appeals reversed the conviction of Benjamin B. Fontaine, who had been arrested in Delmar, which straddles the Maryland--Delaware border. Delmar police have jurisdiction in both states. Fontaine was stopped in the Delaware portion of Delmar on Sept. 8, 1999, after Detective Ronald Marzac recognized him as a man whose driver's license had been suspended in Maryland, according to the court opinion.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
For the past several years, Columbia has been at a crossroads. Redevelopment plans have the potential to change the downtown in ways that founder Jim Rouse could have never imagined. More housing is destined for the core, as is a revamped mall and even a grocery store and gym on the lakefront. Meanwhile, Howard County General and Howard Community College continue to grow. In other parts of Columbia, a plan to overhaul many of the village centers could be ready soon and a new president for the Columbia Association could be introduced nearly any day. And let's not forget that this reimagined Columbia seems destined to include changes around Merriweather Post Pavilion, both in Symphony Woods where there's currently a debate on how to develop portions of that property and on the nearby "crescent property," where the Howard Hughes Corp.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | June 17, 1996
MONEY manager Richard H. Fontaine looks dapper in his business suit, but on occasion you can find him in shorts and sneakers, slogging through the jungle or baking in the desert on the edge of a desolate, wind-swept gold mine in Uzbekistan.A couple of months ago, Fontaine, who at 44 runs three no-load mutual funds from his office in Towson, headed deep into rain forests on a helicopter with about 25 geologists and portfolio managers to visit gold mines in Guiana, French Guiana and Suriname.
SPORTS
By John Strege and John Strege,Orange County Register | May 17, 1992
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- They are on our side now, these Russians. Our enemy is their enemy: the evil umpire. Ronald Reagan would be proud. So would Branch Rickey.Baseball's last frontier, California Angels scouting director Bob Fontaine Jr. called it. Who could have imagined, Russia potentially a breeding ground for America's pastime?"What if we do find some players here?" Fontaine asked wistfully during a recent scouting mission to Moscow.They have embraced baseball in the Commonwealth of Independent States.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
Andre G. Fontaine has designed a lot of buildings in his quarter-century as an architect -- too many to count, he says. But an L-shaped building opening in 1997 likely will stand out from the rest.The East Columbia-based man is donating his time to design Maryland's first assisted-living apartment building for the physically disabled. When completed, the building in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village will be among only a few in the nation.Taking design cues from housing for the elderly, the planned 10,000-square-foot building on Eden Brook Drive will help 15 young to middle-aged disabled people live semi-independently.
FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | October 24, 1993
When Gary and Robin Houston chose the wallpaper for the dining room of their home in Baltimore County, they did so because they loved the formal pattern and the colors. Two centuries earlier, the Phelps and Hatheway families in Suffield, Conn., must have felt the same way."Fontaine de Fleurs," with urns, flowers, swags and birds, was hand-blocked in Paris by Jean Baptiste Reveillon around 1791 and installed in the Phelps-Hatheway House sometime between 1794 and 1796. Discovered there by Henry Francis du Pont, America's premier connoisseur and collector of 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century American decorative arts, the wallpaper was carefully removed and then hung in the Federal parlor at Winterthur, du Pont's country home near Wilmington, Del., now a public museum.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
To understand the pressure of managing a mutual fund, consider a question posed by Richard Fontaine, an alumnus of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. who manages two funds:"If you had all your relatives' money and you lost it all, could you ever go to a family gathering again?"Such is the high-stakes grind faced by managers like Jeffrey N. Vinik, who quit yesterday as manager of Fidelity Investment's Magellan Fund; his successor, Robert E. Stansky; and an army of smaller players.Every day the market climbs to a record high, the manager is expected to climb higher.
NEWS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff writer | October 31, 1991
When the Anne Arundel Community College women's cross country team won its first trophy of the season last month, so many runners took turns holding it that the award eventually was covered with scratches."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
LaFontaine Oliver, general manager at Morgan State's WEAA-FM since 2007, is leaving to run public radio station WMFE-FM in Orlando, according to the Orlando Sentinel. Here's part of Sentinel TV Critic Hal Boedecker's report on the hiring of Oliver: “He has energy and enthusiasm, and we thought he would lead us to great things,” said Derek Blakeslee, chairman of WMFE's board of directors. Oliver replaces Jose Fajardo, who left WMFE in October. Oliver's challenges will include leading a reduced staff through a tumultuous media landscape.
NEWS
By Robert F. Patrick and Robert F. Patrick,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2000
The state's second-highest court overturned the felony drug conviction of a Salisbury man yesterday, with the Eastern Shore community of Delmar playing a pivotal role in the decision. Maryland's Court of Special Appeals reversed the conviction of Benjamin B. Fontaine, who had been arrested in Delmar, which straddles the Maryland--Delaware border. Delmar police have jurisdiction in both states. Fontaine was stopped in the Delaware portion of Delmar on Sept. 8, 1999, after Detective Ronald Marzac recognized him as a man whose driver's license had been suspended in Maryland, according to the court opinion.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
News reports last week stated that several stainless steel plaques on Maryland's new World War II Memorial overlooking the Severn River and the Naval Academy near Annapolis, contained several glaring errors of fact or text.For instance, the date of the Japanese surrender was given as Sept. 6, 1945, rather than Sept. 2.A quote from President Franklin D. Roosevelt's historic war address to a joint session of Congress on Dec. 8, 1941, the day after Pearl Harbor was attacked, says, "a day which will live in infamy" rather than "a date which will live in infamy."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
If you follow the trail of cowboy hats and boots, Wrangler jeans and fringed shirts in Glen Burnie any Tuesday or Wednesday night, chances are, you'll wind up at La Fontaine Bleu.The banquet hall off Ritchie Highway has become a country line-dancing mecca for hundreds of enthusiasts from the Baltimore area. From young children to retirees, dancers flock to the hall for a buffet dinner and a night of dancing."This is great," said Andrea Lorah of Glen Burnie, who has been going every week for more than three years.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | June 17, 1996
MONEY manager Richard H. Fontaine looks dapper in his business suit, but on occasion you can find him in shorts and sneakers, slogging through the jungle or baking in the desert on the edge of a desolate, wind-swept gold mine in Uzbekistan.A couple of months ago, Fontaine, who at 44 runs three no-load mutual funds from his office in Towson, headed deep into rain forests on a helicopter with about 25 geologists and portfolio managers to visit gold mines in Guiana, French Guiana and Suriname.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
To understand the pressure of managing a mutual fund, consider a question posed by Richard Fontaine, an alumnus of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. who manages two funds:"If you had all your relatives' money and you lost it all, could you ever go to a family gathering again?"Such is the high-stakes grind faced by managers like Jeffrey N. Vinik, who quit yesterday as manager of Fidelity Investment's Magellan Fund; his successor, Robert E. Stansky; and an army of smaller players.Every day the market climbs to a record high, the manager is expected to climb higher.
NEWS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff writer | August 30, 1991
When Jim Fontaine first met with his newly formed cross country teamat Anne Arundel Community College last week, he called each member atrue pioneer.The reference had little to do with the school's nickname."
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
Spying the big, brown bear walking down the street waving the American flag and carrying a purple banner with Uncle Sam, 19-month-old Danny Fontaine deserted his parents and his curb-side seat, and raced into the bear's arms as his father chased after him."This is his first parade, and he likes it," said Danny's mother, Debbie, with her son once again next to her and his father, Tim, as the 19th annual Severna Park Fourth of July parade wound its way down Benfield Road yesterday.The parade rolled out of the St. Martin's-in-the-Field Episcopal Church parking lot about 10 a.m. The parade journeyed about 2.5 miles, weaving its way from Benfield Road onto Evergreen Road, then Riggs Avenue, then Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard before ending at Park Plaza, where a festival of carnival rides, food and games awaited.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
One of the nicest gifts hockey fans are getting this Christmas is the return of Buffalo Sabres center Pat LaFontaine to his former self.Perhaps his story isn't as headline-grabbing as that of Pittsburgh Penguin Mario Lemieux, who has come back from cancer and back problems to lead the NHL in scoring, but for anyone who has met LaFontaine or watched him play, it is as compelling.LaFontaine is one of the NHL's truly nice guys.The last time he was playing this well was in 1992-93, when he produced 148 points and challenged Lemieux for the NHL scoring title.
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