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By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
This fondue dinner became my family's favorite special-occasion menu because it's festive, delicious, extravagant and the easiest dinner party you'll ever throw. At times in my life, it has been used as a celebration feast with kids, the menu for a get-together with my sister, a romantic meal with expensive Champagne and an indulgent (and low-carb) dinner alone "because I'm worth it." Beef Fondue With Three Spicy Sauces Serves 2 -- Total time: 35 minutes HORSERADISH SAUCE: 1/2 cup plain yogurt 3 tablespoons prepared horseradish juice of 1/2 lime 2 green onions, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper to taste CHILI CREAM SAUCE: 1/2 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon hot chile paste HOT MUSTARD SAUCE: 1/2 cup plain yogurt 3 teaspoons dry mustard 1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill BEEF: 2 to 3 cups peanut or canola oil 1/2 pound beef tenderloin, cut into 1-inch pieces For each sauce, combine the ingredients in a serving bowl.
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NEWS
by Carson Porter | March 11, 2011
In celebration of "National Cheese Fondue Day", the Melting Pot is giving away free cheese fondue. Just click here to get your reservation code, then call your nearest Melting Pot and make a reservation between 4/11 - 4/14. Lastly, show up and eat some free cheese fondue. It doesn't say that any purchase is necessary but do yourself a favor and get some chocolate fondue for dessert.
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FEATURES
By Teresa J. Farney and Teresa J. Farney,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 6, 2002
You don't have to do anything elaborate to make a memorable dinner. Go for something, oh, a little Swiss, like creamy cheeses and foods that are easily gathered together for a meal that you can linger over for hours. In other words, go for fondues. Fondue is back, even if it involves dusting off your sorry-looking olive-green 1970s set. It won't matter what it looks like once it has Classic Swiss Fondue in it, or a dressed-up recipe from Rick Rodgers' Fondue: Great Food to Dip, Dunk, Savor, and Swirl cookbook.
NEWS
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,special to the Sun | January 19, 2007
Fuss-free fondue is an appealing idea for all of us whose kitchen cabinets contain one or more fondue pots that go unused for various reasons. To serve fondue at home, there's the need for lots of Sterno to keep the cooking medium hot, and hunting for such a seldom-purchased item slows down the weekly race through the grocery store. Then there's the melt-but-don't-burn pot of cheeses that have to be watched and timed precisely to be served at the same time as the just-right pot of hot oil for searing meat.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE[ and ELIZABETH LARGE[,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 11, 2006
If stars were given for fun, the Melting Pot would be a four star restaurant. But for the food, not so many. Still, give the place credit for making people not only willing, but also eager, to pay to cook their own dinner. The Melting Pot specializes in fondue, that throwback to the early '70s. But the restaurant's popularity has nothing to do with retro appeal. Most of its customers probably weren't even born when the fondue craze hit. Those who remember fondue's origins know it's the only food that has a kissing tradition -- if you lose a piece of bread in the pot of melted cheese you're supposed to kiss someone.
NEWS
By Christianna McCausland and Christianna McCausland,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2004
On a recent Saturday afternoon in February, the cozy tasting room at Boordy Vineyards is crowded with visitors. But the main attraction this day isn't being served in a glass, but on a stick. Caramel, chocolate and roasted red pepper pesto cheese fondue, each made with a swirl of Boordy wine, simmer in black crockpots on a buffet table brimming with fruit, vegetables and desserts for dipping. "We thought it would be the perfect winter getaway," says Jennifer Marsh, who came from Owings Mills with three friends to enjoy the sweet and savory offerings.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2004
The Melting Pot restaurant in Columbia offers a delectable dip into fine dining. So lush is its mood, service and cuisine that it is hard to believe that the popular fondue restaurant is part of a chain of franchises throughout the United States. The Melting Pot in Wilde Lake Village Center elevates the fondue pot to haute cuisine, offering a variety of cheese, meat and seafood, and chocolate fondues. Begin and end dinner with a specialty coffee, or sample one of the restaurant's 140 wines.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 28, 1999
Along with disco balls and lava lamps, one more retro item has made a comeback: the fondue pot. And just in time to take full advantage of this nostalgic trend, the Baltimore area has a new fondue restaurant.The original Melting Pot opened in Florida in 1975. In that more innocent time, no one would have imagined that the '90s paranoia about raw meats and seafood would delay the opening of Towson's franchise for more than six months.The Melting Pot did finally open in February after the owners satisfied Baltimore County officials' health concerns.
FEATURES
By Marlene Parrish and Marlene Parrish,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
Quite often the comfort foods that we crave when times are worrisome have some kind of melted cheese as an ingredient. Some even feature melted cheese as the star ingredient. Here are some homely versions of soft and velvety melted cheese from various corners of the world. We can thank the occasional poor aim of English sportsmen for Welsh rarebit - melted cheese on toast, the dish that is eaten for supper when the hunter comes home empty-handed without a rabbit. The Swiss were the first to dip cubes of crusty bread into melted cheese blended with seasonings and wine to make the first cheese fondue, now a cocktail-party standard.
FEATURES
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | November 5, 2005
What it is: -- A fondue fountain by Fundue Foods for the home. How it works: -- Place chocolate used for dipping into the bowl. When plugged in, the heater underneath melts the chocolate. The auger inside the fountain tower, attached to the bowl, guides the melted chocolate up and out of the tower to produce a constant flow of chocolate over the tiers. What we like about it: -- Just like the fancy fondue towers seen at VIP parties and exclusive events. What it costs: -- $239 How to order: -- Can be purchased online at funduefoods.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | September 17, 2006
The sun was out, as was the sumptuous luncheon buffet at the Maryland Polo Club field in Monkton. Under a bright yellow tent, a tiered fountain bubbled with chocolate. The sounds of laughs and light conversation mingled with the thundering of horses' hooves, and the clicking of mallets on polo balls. It all made for a perfect "Afternoon of Polo," the annual fundraiser for the Abilities Network / Epilepsy Foundation of the Chesapeake Region. Except this year, there weren't quite as many people on the sidelines as in the past.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE[ and ELIZABETH LARGE[,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 11, 2006
If stars were given for fun, the Melting Pot would be a four star restaurant. But for the food, not so many. Still, give the place credit for making people not only willing, but also eager, to pay to cook their own dinner. The Melting Pot specializes in fondue, that throwback to the early '70s. But the restaurant's popularity has nothing to do with retro appeal. Most of its customers probably weren't even born when the fondue craze hit. Those who remember fondue's origins know it's the only food that has a kissing tradition -- if you lose a piece of bread in the pot of melted cheese you're supposed to kiss someone.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
This fondue dinner became my family's favorite special-occasion menu because it's festive, delicious, extravagant and the easiest dinner party you'll ever throw. At times in my life, it has been used as a celebration feast with kids, the menu for a get-together with my sister, a romantic meal with expensive Champagne and an indulgent (and low-carb) dinner alone "because I'm worth it." Beef Fondue With Three Spicy Sauces Serves 2 -- Total time: 35 minutes HORSERADISH SAUCE: 1/2 cup plain yogurt 3 tablespoons prepared horseradish juice of 1/2 lime 2 green onions, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper to taste CHILI CREAM SAUCE: 1/2 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon hot chile paste HOT MUSTARD SAUCE: 1/2 cup plain yogurt 3 teaspoons dry mustard 1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill BEEF: 2 to 3 cups peanut or canola oil 1/2 pound beef tenderloin, cut into 1-inch pieces For each sauce, combine the ingredients in a serving bowl.
FEATURES
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | November 5, 2005
What it is: -- A fondue fountain by Fundue Foods for the home. How it works: -- Place chocolate used for dipping into the bowl. When plugged in, the heater underneath melts the chocolate. The auger inside the fountain tower, attached to the bowl, guides the melted chocolate up and out of the tower to produce a constant flow of chocolate over the tiers. What we like about it: -- Just like the fancy fondue towers seen at VIP parties and exclusive events. What it costs: -- $239 How to order: -- Can be purchased online at funduefoods.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 12, 2005
There's a story told that cheese fondue began as survival food for early Alpine settlers, who found that stale bread, a wedge of cheese and a dram of wine made for a nourishing and very cheap meal. As a starving college student perpetually low on funds yet always ready to party, I found that cheese fondues were a way to feed many for little. I would buy the best cheese I could afford, cut it up, put it in the pot and pour in a little bit of whatever plonk was available (using red was a mistake; the fondue turned purple)
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2004
The Melting Pot restaurant in Columbia offers a delectable dip into fine dining. So lush is its mood, service and cuisine that it is hard to believe that the popular fondue restaurant is part of a chain of franchises throughout the United States. The Melting Pot in Wilde Lake Village Center elevates the fondue pot to haute cuisine, offering a variety of cheese, meat and seafood, and chocolate fondues. Begin and end dinner with a specialty coffee, or sample one of the restaurant's 140 wines.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | January 17, 2001
Dandy dessert dip If you're getting together with friends to watch football playoffs, Hershey's has an idea for an easy dessert fondue. Combine 2 cups of semisweet chocolate chips, milk chocolate chips or peanut butter chips with 1/4 cup of milk and one 14-ounce can of sweetened condensed milk and microwave 1 to 1 1/2 minutes on high until mixture is melted and smooth when stirred. Pour into fondue pot or warmer and serve with poundcake pieces, marshmallows, strawberries, pretzels, corn chips or crackers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | March 26, 1993
Gampy's must be the granddaddy of fun restaurants in the Baltimore area, the ones that are part singles bar and part trendy eatery. The name stands for Great American Melting Pot, with a "y" thrown in to make it sound even more fun.Campy's was one of the first restaurants around here to offer foods of different ethnic backgrounds, which was a pretty original concept when the place opened some 15 years ago. Nowadays, though, quesadillas and blackened fish...
NEWS
By Christianna McCausland and Christianna McCausland,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2004
On a recent Saturday afternoon in February, the cozy tasting room at Boordy Vineyards is crowded with visitors. But the main attraction this day isn't being served in a glass, but on a stick. Caramel, chocolate and roasted red pepper pesto cheese fondue, each made with a swirl of Boordy wine, simmer in black crockpots on a buffet table brimming with fruit, vegetables and desserts for dipping. "We thought it would be the perfect winter getaway," says Jennifer Marsh, who came from Owings Mills with three friends to enjoy the sweet and savory offerings.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | May 4, 2003
It used to be so easy. You made your mom a nice ashtray for Mother's Day at school, and she adored it. But now you're a little older and you need some help finding that perfect present. You're tired of the generic gifts -- the flowers, the scarf, the box of chocolates. You want something that fits the kind of person she is. For some kinds of mothers, you probably don't need help. If she's sporty, a serious gardener or the family historian, a gift she'd love practically suggests itself.
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