Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFolklore
IN THE NEWS

Folklore

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 28, 1996
If the show is half as good as its title, "The Prozac in Pandora's Box" should be something to see. Written by Laura Amlie, a student in Towson State University's graduate theater program, this pharmaceutically titled multimedia work opens a three-week run at the Theatre Project on Wednesday.Billed as "a raucous roller coaster ride . . . from ancient mythology to modern folklore, childbirth to Chernobyl and the French Revolution to the Baltimore streets," the original work uses wordplay, movement, masks, puppetry and music to examine "creative survival."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
As Jesse Walker sees it, the Land of the Free is rife with paranoid theories about everyone and everything. We always have been a nation that seeks out subversives lurking in the amber waves of grain. And we always will be, though the Towson author says that America isn't more paranoid than any other nation. Nor is distrust, suspicion and hyper-vigilance always an irrational response. History has too often proved otherwise. "I'm not setting out in this book to prove or debunk any particular conspiracy theory," Walker says a few days before coming to the Ivy Bookshop to discuss his new history of conspiracy theories, "The United States of Paranoia.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | April 15, 1991
MARYLAND FOLKLORE. By George G. Carey. Tidewater Publishers. 163 pages. $12.95.SMITH ISLAND, CHESAPEAKE BAY. By Frances W. Dize. Tidewater Publishers. Photos by M.E. Warren, A. Aubrey Bodine and others. 214 pages. $22.95.GEORGE G. Carey was once the official state folklorist of Maryland, and Frances W. Dize lived for a long time with her husband on Smith Island, but neither the state's folksy lore nor Smith Island's water-bound history -- the subjects of their books -- was quite enough to keep either author in permanent residence here.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch , arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
The American Folklore Society has just smiled on one of Maryland's veteran folklorists, even if news of an award makes for a season of mixed blessings for Elaine Eff. She seems to be taking it all in stride, thinking about the next thing, and the next. Since the 1980s, she's been a champion of Baltimore screen painters, Smith Island cake bakers, crab pickers, muskrat skinners, watermen, crafts makers and mill hands - efforts that have earned her the Botkin Prize, considered the top honor the 121-year-old American Folklore Society gives to folklorists who are not affiliated with a university.
NEWS
By Carroll Lisby | November 15, 1990
ONCE EVERY generation or so a person or event becomes so famous, so universally known and talked about, that it crosses the line from history into folklore.This happened to railroad legends Casey Jones and John Henry. It's also happened to Lizzie Borden. Everybody knows Lizzie Borden.At a young age I -- like most of my contemporaries -- became acquainted with Lizzie through a popular children's rhyme which went: Lizzie Borden took an axAnd gave her mother 40 whacks.And when the job was nicely done,She gave her father 41.Later my impression of Lizzie and her ax-wielding indiscretion was deepened by a song called "Lizzie Borden," which the Chad Mitchell Trio recorded during the '60s folk revival.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | April 12, 1993
He was very tall and lanky and spit tobacco juice. A real pro baseball player. And he could swing the bat. Every season, his average was up over .300.But he was a career bush leaguer. Big as he was, most of his hits were singles and doubles. And a painfully slow outfielder must slam home runs to make it to the bigs.He had been there for a few games. It was called a cup of coffee. Just enough to savor the taste.But it was back to the minors, the bus rides with the kids, the has-beens, and the never-will-be's.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 20, 1992
An elderly man, he spoke firmly and precisely. "I'm calling to give you a story about a very shocking and dangerous situation that is being covered up by school officials in Hoffman Estates."And what is this dangerous situation?"A volunteer blood drive was held at the Conant High School. It was for senior students only. Blood was given by 317 seniors. The blood has since been tested, and 61 tested positive for the HIV virus."If true, that is indeed shocking. Are you on the school faculty?
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Christmas Eve, and twelve of the clock."Now they are all on their knees,"An elder said as we sat in a flockBy the embers in hearthside ease."The Oxen," by Thomas HardyHorses get a few crunchy apples and carrots. The cattle get extra straw for their bedding. And the leafiest, greenest bales of hay are often set aside for Christmas Eve.Whether they've heard the old legend about animals praying or talking at midnight on Christmas Eve, those who make their living with these beasts find they can't resist doing some extra-special things for them on that night.
FEATURES
By Wendy Warren Keebler and Wendy Warren Keebler,Knight-Ridder | October 10, 1991
No, chihuahuas don't cure asthma, there's no coke in Coke, and sneezing is not -- we repeat, not -- an effective means of birth control.But bees do tend to sting sweet (well, sweet-smelling) people, carrots are good for the eyes and cranberry juice can help prevent bladder infections.These are just a few of the nuggets of medical folklore in the new dictionary-style book "Feed a Cold, Starve a Fever" by Carol Ann Rinzler (Facts on File, $21.95).Rinzler has collected medical myths for 17 years.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
ST. CROIX RIVER, Maine -- Stephen Cobb has one eye on the sky as he leans forward in his canoe and dips his paddle into the warm currents that twist deep into this state's vast wilderness.As a bald eagle glides by and loons call in the distance, this 50-year-old river guide is worrying about the onset of a summer storm."That's called a sun dog," he says, pointing to the ring of haze around the late afternoon sun. "That means there's moisture in the upper atmosphere, and we can expect some rain tomorrow."
NEWS
August 31, 2008
Compas de Nicaragua, a nonprofit organization supporting health and education projects in Nicaragua, will present a Nicaragua folklore dance performance at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 15 at the Meeting House, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, in Oakland Mills Village Center. The multimedia performance includes dances in costume, performed to marimba music. Members of the five-member ensemble are also members of Mujeres en Accion (Women in action), a women's group that lives and works on community projects in a poor settlement in Managua, Nicaragua.
NEWS
August 12, 2006
Howard County: Endorsement Robey announces support for O'Malley Howard County Executive James N. Robey announced yesterday at a Columbia news conference that he is endorsing Mayor Martin O'Malley for governor. Robey, a Democrat, has been the leader of Howard since 1998 and served as the county's police chief for seven years before his election as county executive. "Martin O'Malley will be a governor who puts the interests of Howard County families ahead of those of the special interests," Robey said, according to a campaign statement.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
It's yellowjacket season. With their numbers rising and normal foods in short supply, the brassy bugs are crashing our picnics. They compete for our soda, beer, meat and ice cream, and they can deliver painful stings to the unwary. Sometimes they trigger severe allergic reactions. Scientists who study those reactions - by prodding the insects to sting volunteers - say they have encountered a lot of folklore about yellowjacket stings. And much of it turns out to be flat wrong. For example, many people insist that a yellowjacket's venom gets stronger as summer turns to fall.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | March 10, 2006
Penguin Press announced this week that it will pay $8.5 million for the memoirs of former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan. During 18 years at the Fed, until his retirement in January, Mr. Greenspan captivated Washington and the world with his pronouncements about the economy, delivered in a style that came to be known as "oracular obscurity." But experts say it is not clear how well the oracular-obscurist style will adapt itself to the genre of autobiography. The book is due to be published in September 2007.
NEWS
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS and BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
Double, double, toil and trouble! Fire burn and caldron bubble! There's nothing like the familiar words of William Shakespeare to get us in the Halloween spirit. But ever wonder why Shakespeare decided to add a dash of eye of newt and toe of frog, wool of bat and tongue of dog in the caldron? Obviously not to entice his guests to chow down. So why conjure up such a delightful mixture? Superstition, of course. Superstitions and food have gone hand in hand for ages. Barry Swanson, a food historian at Washington State University, says that not only was garlic used in the past "to keep the werewolves away," but also to "exorcise worms and other ghastly things from the body."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 7, 2005
Thursdays at the BMA Celebrate the first Thursday of April at the Baltimore Museum of Art's "Free First Thursday" event today. Enjoy free admission to the museum, tours, family-friendly activities, live music and more. The event kicks off at 11 a.m. with a talk on how to get inspired by landscape paintings and create your own work-of-art garden. Other events include tours of the exhibit SlideShow with a BMA docent, live music by the Jezic Ensemble, a textile make-and-take art workshop and a talk on the Cone sisters and their lace collection.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
Folklorist Simon Carmel knows all of the popular jokes in the deaf community. For instance, there's the one about the woodsman who decides to cut down three trees. He cuts down the first tree, calls 'Timber!' and the tree falls with a mighty crash.He cuts down the second tree, calls 'Timber!' and the tree falls with a mighty crash. He cuts down the third tree, and calls 'Timber!'-- but nothing happens.Alarmed, the woodsman calls a tree surgeon who examines the tree and tells him it is deaf.
NEWS
April 8, 1996
David Cohen, a sophomore at the Key School in Annapolis, has been cast in the Kennedy Center's "Traveling Young Players 1996," a musical production celebrating tales, myths and legends from American folklore.The program is in its fifth season of presenting multicultural stories through song and dance.David is one of a cast of 16 that was selected from more than 175 youths who auditioned. He is the son of Stewart and Marcia Cohen of Annapolis.Pub Date: 4/08/96
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Akira Yoshizawa, a master paper folder widely acclaimed as the father of modern origami, died March 14, his 94th birthday, at a hospital near his home in Ogikubo, a suburb of Tokyo. The cause was complications of pneumonia Internationally recognized since the 1950s, he was credited with elevating a children's pastime into a serious form of figurative art. He was known both for his innovative folding techniques and for devising a notation system that made origami instructions universally accessible.
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Bryce Manubay wore a toga and carried a tinfoil trident. Against a painted backdrop of Mount Olympus, the sixth-grader put his creative touch on the role the Greek god Poseidon might have played in the origin of hurricanes, thunderstorms and floods. Because Poseidon didn't like it when people dumped trash into his ocean, Bryce said, "he put a curse on the sea, such that when he commanded it, the water would churn, the skies would darken and Zeus would go crazy with thunderbolts, summoning a storm."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.