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By Rebecca Oppenheimer | June 29, 2011
The solstice has come and gone, so summer 2011 is officially under way. With it, comes that staple of warm weather entertainment, the open-air music festival. If you would rather not brave the heat and crowds, you might try one of these three volumes for a vicarious musical experience. "Electric Eden" by Rob Young Faber and Faber, $25 Outdoor musical performances are nothing new, hearkening back as they do to an idealized pastoral society. Rob Young begins his masterly history of the British folk revival movement with the story of singer-songwriter Vashti Bunyan, whose journey by horse-drawn caravan in 1968 and 1969 introduces the book's major themes.
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By Mike Giuliano | January 31, 2013
The 19th-century German classical music repertory is not directly represented on the Columbia Orchestra's next concert, but its romantic influence will be heard in the program scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 2, at 7:30 p.m., in the Jim Rouse Theatre, at Wilde Lake High School. On the upcoming program are Jean Sibelius' Symphony No. 5, Benjamin Britten's "Four Sea Interludes" from his opera "Peter Grimes" and Samuel Barber's Violin Concerto. "They're all 20th-century composers, but rather than breaking with traditions they're extending traditions," observes Columbia Orchestra Music Director Jason Love.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
What would be more appropriate for a Winter Solstice Concert than a meeting of the Prodigy and the Titan? Translated, it is a musical encounter between Alison Krauss, the 19-year-old bluegrass whiz from Illinois, and Baltimore's Helicon, an instrumental trio whose latest album is entitled "The Titan."Krauss with her band Union Station and Helicon perform at 8 tomorrow night in Kraushaar Auditorium at Goucher College.For Helicon members Chris Norman, Ken Kolodner and Robin Bullock, the fifth Winter Solstice Concert salutes their Baltimore following and celebrates the release of a new album on the Turquoise label.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Tuesday, Dec. 11 Meeting and party The National Association of Retired Federal Employees, Chapter 1519, meets at 1 p.m. at Holy Trinity Parish Hall, 7436 Baltimore/Annapolis Blvd. in Glen Burnie. The chapter's potluck Christmas party will be held. Information: 410-760-3750. Wednesday, Dec. 12 Photographers meet The Arundel Camera Club meets at 7:30 p.m. in Room D114 at Severna Park High School, 60 Robinson Road. The club holds its digital, black-and-white and color prints and slides competitions.
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By Will Hylton | October 3, 1991
Folk music fans will be just this side of heaven this weekend, with two exceptional folk performances to attend.On Friday, The Coffee House at Otterbein will present Jane Gillman, Carol Thomas Downing and Catie Curtis in singer/songwriter Round Robin. On Saturday, the Baltimore Folk Music Society will sponsor an Irish concert and dance with music from Billy McComiskey, Carol Ann Hunner and Timothy Britton.Friday's concert will feature original songs performed by the songwriters, complemented by their instrumental talents.
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By Susanne Althoff and Susanne Althoff,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
Relaxed days and swinging nights have become a Baltimore Folk Festival tradition.The atmosphere during the day is usually easy-going, with folk music fans mingling throughout dance and music workshops, said John Yankee, a musician with the folk trio Cross Country. But as the night nears, a crescendo builds until the final concert and dance, and "it gets wild," Mr. Yankee said.The tradition will continue this Friday and Saturday when more than 200 performers, including Cross Country, get together for the sixth annual festival sponsored by the Baltimore Folk Music Society.
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By Eric Siegel | January 17, 1992
Folk music has helped fuel some of the most important protests of the last quarter century. Now area folk musicians and others involved in the music are organizing a protest of their own.Their protest concerns the cancellation of the Lee Michael Dempsey Show on Washington public radio station WAMU-FM (88.5). The station replaced Mr. Dempsey's long-running noon to 3 p.m. weekday show of folk, acoustic and bluegrass music on Wednesday with a local two-hour talk show hosted by Derek McGinty and an hour of a new national talk show syndicated by National Public Radio.
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By A. Scharnhorst and A. Scharnhorst,The Kansas City Star | August 22, 1993
Folk music is back in fashion.Part of it is the music -- acoustic artists are attaining rarely seen popularity -- but a lot of it is the message. Political turmoil, war, economic instability and environmental concerns worldwide are making people relate to folk music once again."
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By Cox News Service | February 13, 1991
The distinctive voice of Odetta has graced many a stage in her 47 years of entertaining. But the folk singer/actress/civil rights activist -- who performs Sunday at the University of Maryland at Baltimore -- feels that the best is yet to come."
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By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Contributing Writer | January 14, 1994
For years, Bill Morrissey, who appears tonight at the Coffee House Uptown, was just another gravelly voiced New England folk singer struggling to make a go of it during an era when his brand of introspective acoustic music was largely passe.Playing clubs and beer bars across the country, Morrissey could usually draw just enough people to get hired back and make just enough money to get on to the next gig. For years, if he made $2,000 off his music, it was a good year."Yeah, it was pretty tough back in the '70s," laughs the 42-year-old Grammy-nominated singer, who dropped out of Plymouth State College in New Hampshire at age 17. "I mean, what was the least hip thing but folk music?"
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By Charlotte and "Doc" Cronin | June 8, 2012
What is summer without the free summer concerts? At Aberdeen's Festival Park another summer season will begin on June 19 at 7 p.m. These concerts will be held every Tuesday evening through Aug. 21. They are sponsored by the Aberdeen Board of Parks and Recreation, and conveniently located downtown, at the park off Howard Street. Starting off on June 19 will be the Mudbugs, an acoustic Folk and Roots Rock group with New Orleans Zydeco and blues influences. Kraig Greff and Chris Huntington, core members of the East Coast band, The Crawdaddies.
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By Rebecca Oppenheimer | June 29, 2011
The solstice has come and gone, so summer 2011 is officially under way. With it, comes that staple of warm weather entertainment, the open-air music festival. If you would rather not brave the heat and crowds, you might try one of these three volumes for a vicarious musical experience. "Electric Eden" by Rob Young Faber and Faber, $25 Outdoor musical performances are nothing new, hearkening back as they do to an idealized pastoral society. Rob Young begins his masterly history of the British folk revival movement with the story of singer-songwriter Vashti Bunyan, whose journey by horse-drawn caravan in 1968 and 1969 introduces the book's major themes.
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
There are so many big-voiced female British singers, it's hard to keep track of them. There's Adele, out with new album "21," and there's Duffy, of the ubiquitous "Mercy. " Then there's Florence Welch and Elly Jackson, of La Roux, not to mention the ones who started it all, Lily Allen and Amy Winehouse. Joining their ranks this year is Ellie Goulding, a 24-year-old singer from Hereford, England, whose new album, "Lights," has already climbed to the top of the British music charts.
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By Peter Krause, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Old will be new again this weekend at the annual Richmond Folk Festival. Now in its third year, the festival casts a contemporary light on traditional folk culture through live music, dance, arts and food. Artists, dancers and more than 30 musicians will be on hand to showcase a heritage that brings communities together through common regions, religions and artistic expression. More than 160,000 attended last year's event. "We don't focus so much on getting a few big names as much as getting together the best folk artists in the region, if not the world," said Joshua Kohn, programming manager for the National Council for the Traditional Arts, which organizes the festival.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 3, 2009
Although it's convenient for some to think of music being divided into totally separate worlds, with the classical variety way over in some isolated corner where only the "elite" indulge in it, there are innumerable connecting, welcoming points between genres. One mission of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's new season is to emphasize such links, programming works that reveal roots planted in folk music or jazz, for example. Last week, bluegrass found its way into the picture via a concerto by Jennifer Higdon featuring a hotshot crossover trio; this week, the folk influences behind familiar pieces by Tchaikovsky and Bartok are being given fresh attention.
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By [AARON CHESTER] | October 18, 2007
Video games score at Ottobar The lowdown -- Put on your game faces and head to the Ottobar on Tuesday for a night of free movies and video game competition. Featured movies will be The Wizard, a 1989 film about kids who try to win a video game championship, and Fistful of Quarters: The King of Kong, a documentary about breaking the Donkey Kong high score. There will also be a competition of the 1980s game Galaga. If you go -- Doors open at 8 p.m.; The Wizard starts at 9 p.m.; The King of Kong starts at 11 p.m. Ottobar is at 2549 N. Howard St. Call 410-662-0069 or go to the ottobar.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Like the troubadours it often features, the Uptown Concert Series is on the move again. The folk music series has closed at Mays Chapel United Methodist Church in Timonium because of "policy changes" at the church, says Joyce Sica, impresario of the 11-year-old folk music series.Under her management, the concert series -- known for its eclectic musical lineup, from Odetta to Big Blow and the Bushwackers -- has divided its time among three United Methodist churches: Old Otterbein and Wilson Memorial, both in Baltimore City, and, for the past five years, suburban Mays Chapel, where it was rechristened Uptown Concerts.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Jerry Lapides plays a few bars of the old klezmer wedding dance "Frailach Fun Der Chuppa," "happiness of the nuptial canopy," his harmonica infusing the festive song with an undertone of nostalgic sadness.While he plays, Lapides has the faintly ethereal quality of Marc Chagall's Vitebsk fiddlers. And the "Frailach" has the sound and feel of the wedding music from "Fiddler on the Roof."Klezmer was the folk music of the East European shtetl Chagall painted and Shalom Aleichem chronicled, the small-town Jewish communities lost in the furnace of the Nazi Holocaust.
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