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Folk Dance

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | March 18, 1999
Chinese danceThe Chinese Folk Dance Company takes the stage Sunday at Towson University to present an afternoon of classical dance and music representative of China's folk culture and tradition. As dancers' colorful silk ribbons, feather fans, handkerchiefs and swords fill the air, and elaborate costumes and props fill the stage, the audience is transported into a world of myths and historical drama, with music and dance from the rural farmlands to the Imperial Palace.The Chinese Folk Dance Company is the resident dance company of the New York Chinese Cultural Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | November 14, 2012
Kylie Minogue opens the show with her 1987 remake of "The Locomotion. " Can you believe that was 25 years ago? Kylie's face can't. Also, her dress is more a shirt. LEGS ARE NOT PANTS. Kylie does come down from the stage onto the dance floor and do a little shimmying herself, because she seems like one of the most fun people on the planet. Tom interviews Kylie and says, "Now that song came out 25 years ago, back when you were 7 years old. " I love him so much. Footage from last night: Melissa and Tony were psyched about their first perfect score.
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NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A House of Delegates committee do-si-doed into the high-pressure world of convention politics yesterday, endorsing legislation that would make the square dance Maryland's official folk dance.In doing so, the Appropriations Committee was responding to a letter from the Washington Area Square Dancers Cooperative Association urging the panel to reverse its earlier rejection of the bill.The association said it had hoped to bid for a future national square-dance convention at this year's gathering in Portland, Ore., but that the committee's initial action had rendered that effort "useless."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
The students trickle into the gym at Johnnycake Elementary, deposit their bags against a wall and make a beeline for one of the colored dots marked on the floor. Then it's time to dance. The electric slide, the Cotton Eye Joe, the Macarena - even the chicken dance. For half an hour before school, the student members of Johnnycake's folk-dance group cover them all, easily hopping, clapping or sliding from one to the next without missing a beat. "We get a lot of different eras in there," said Sara Hampt, the school's vocal music teacher, who took over the team a year ago. The kids are divided by age, the younger ones - who usually need more repetition - coming in on Mondays, and others split between Wednesdays and Fridays, Hampt said.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
The pulsating drum beat beckoned the Jow Ga Lion Dance and Demo Team to the stage at Bonnie Branch Middle School in Ellicott City. While more than 150 people looked on Thursday night in the school cafeteria, the dancers performed the "The Lion Dance," a performance featuring folk dance and kung fu, a martial art. Clad in bright red and black jumpsuits and partially covered by a lion costume, the dancers kicked their feet in the air, jumped up and down...
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
PUPILS AT Taneytown Elementary School sat in awe last week as members of the Chinese Folk Dance Company mimicked the moves of birds and told tales through dance. The hourlong presentation was sponsored by the school's PTO through the Young Audiences of Maryland program, said Maggie Weicht, PTO president. "We do about 500 shows a year," said Amy Chin, leader of the five-member dance troupe, which is based in New York City. Before performing in Taneytown, the group had performed in Silver Spring and on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
Counting the successes of the 1994 General Assembly session that just ended is easy: You can do it on the fingers of one hand. But adding up the failures of this disappointing meeting isn't nearly that simple: You need more than two hands.When it came to the art of legislating, Maryland's elected senators and delegates took a vacation this session. Their only concern was paving the way for their reelection campaigns. No one wanted to risk voting for controversial measures that might offend any group of constituents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Charlotte Giza, lead singer of Baltimore band Klezazz, is ready to branch out. "We're primarily a klezmer band," she says. "We play Yiddish and Hebrew songs from Eastern Europe, the kind of music that formed in small communities and came out of what was happening in their lives and really rings in your heart. We really want to get out in the community and reach people that might not know what klezmer music was." Klezazz recently performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art's First Thursday, but despite the event's success, Giza still felt something was missing.
NEWS
July 18, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Got those layoff blues Laid-off Mercantile workers need a lawyer to understand their separation papers. They are just the latest to become entangled in the legal morass. business baltimoresun.com/hancock Taste is in your mouth Some artists on the fringes of Artscape are cooking up exhibits with an art theme, hoping to lure art-hungry masses. Taste baltimoresun.com/kasper OTHER VOICES Laura Vozzella on MD4BUSH -- Maryland Greg Kane on witness's last say -- Maryland Rick Maese on David Beckham -- Sports 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY `Godspell' -- This family-friendly version of the '70s hit is at the Olney Theatre Center for the Arts, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25-$46.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | November 14, 2012
Kylie Minogue opens the show with her 1987 remake of "The Locomotion. " Can you believe that was 25 years ago? Kylie's face can't. Also, her dress is more a shirt. LEGS ARE NOT PANTS. Kylie does come down from the stage onto the dance floor and do a little shimmying herself, because she seems like one of the most fun people on the planet. Tom interviews Kylie and says, "Now that song came out 25 years ago, back when you were 7 years old. " I love him so much. Footage from last night: Melissa and Tony were psyched about their first perfect score.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
The students trickle into the gym at Johnnycake Elementary, deposit their bags against a wall and make a beeline for one of the colored dots marked on the floor. Then it's time to dance. The electric slide, the Cotton Eye Joe, the Macarena - even the chicken dance. For half an hour before school, the student members of Johnnycake's folk-dance group cover them all, easily hopping, clapping or sliding from one to the next without missing a beat. "We get a lot of different eras in there," said Sara Hampt, the school's vocal music teacher, who took over the team a year ago. The kids are divided by age, the younger ones - who usually need more repetition - coming in on Mondays, and others split between Wednesdays and Fridays, Hampt said.
NEWS
July 18, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Got those layoff blues Laid-off Mercantile workers need a lawyer to understand their separation papers. They are just the latest to become entangled in the legal morass. business baltimoresun.com/hancock Taste is in your mouth Some artists on the fringes of Artscape are cooking up exhibits with an art theme, hoping to lure art-hungry masses. Taste baltimoresun.com/kasper OTHER VOICES Laura Vozzella on MD4BUSH -- Maryland Greg Kane on witness's last say -- Maryland Rick Maese on David Beckham -- Sports 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY `Godspell' -- This family-friendly version of the '70s hit is at the Olney Theatre Center for the Arts, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25-$46.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Charlotte Giza, lead singer of Baltimore band Klezazz, is ready to branch out. "We're primarily a klezmer band," she says. "We play Yiddish and Hebrew songs from Eastern Europe, the kind of music that formed in small communities and came out of what was happening in their lives and really rings in your heart. We really want to get out in the community and reach people that might not know what klezmer music was." Klezazz recently performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art's First Thursday, but despite the event's success, Giza still felt something was missing.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
The pulsating drum beat beckoned the Jow Ga Lion Dance and Demo Team to the stage at Bonnie Branch Middle School in Ellicott City. While more than 150 people looked on Thursday night in the school cafeteria, the dancers performed the "The Lion Dance," a performance featuring folk dance and kung fu, a martial art. Clad in bright red and black jumpsuits and partially covered by a lion costume, the dancers kicked their feet in the air, jumped up and down...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Tibetan incense fills Maria Broom's tidy apartment in Randallstown. A gentle, a rhythmic bossa nova tune plays on her stereo. She wears an earth-tone tunic and brown leggings. Large chunks of amber - set in silver - dangle from her ears and she wears several silver and copper bracelets. Her voice is soft but strong as she welcomes a guest on a recent afternoon. "I'm a joy-bringer," says the native Baltimorean. "I'm a hostess. I create environments, I can go into any place and make the space more than welcoming.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2003
With the lineup of concerts in its 2003-2004 Vice Admiral Eliot Bryant and Miriam Bryant Distinguished Artists Series, the Naval Academy adds to its legacy as a source of cultural enrichment for the region. Ethnic folk dancing from Russia, a marvelous pianist appearing with a distinguished European orchestra, one of the great choral symphonies of the 20th century, perhaps the most glamorous ballet of all and a gut-wrenching night of treachery at the opera are all in store for this year's subscribers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Tibetan incense fills Maria Broom's tidy apartment in Randallstown. A gentle, a rhythmic bossa nova tune plays on her stereo. She wears an earth-tone tunic and brown leggings. Large chunks of amber - set in silver - dangle from her ears and she wears several silver and copper bracelets. Her voice is soft but strong as she welcomes a guest on a recent afternoon. "I'm a joy-bringer," says the native Baltimorean. "I'm a hostess. I create environments, I can go into any place and make the space more than welcoming.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
Have you been held back from a career as a musician simply because the only half-way musical thing you can do is stick your tongue out and blow a raspberry?Good news, folks: your time has come. This weekend at one of several workshops at the eighth annual Baltimore Folk Festival at Bryn Mawr School, you can learn to play the Australian didgeridoo -- a hollowed out eucalyptus log whose distinctive bass drone comes from the lip-buzzing action you get only with a really wet raspberry or Bronx Cheer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Herman Harry Freedland, retired chief mail clerk for the Social Security Administration and teacher of Eastern European folk dances, died of sepsis Oct. 3 at Sinai Hospital. He was 89. Mr. Freedland was born in East Baltimore, the son of Jewish immigrant parents, and raised on Thomas Avenue in Walbrook. He left school in the ninth grade, after the death of his father, to help support his family. Throughout his life, Mr. Freedland worked at a succession of jobs. He sold cemetery plots, garbage-disposal systems, and was a counter man at the old Nate's & Leon's North Avenue deli and Globus Cafeteria in the city's Garment District.
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