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By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,Sun Staff | January 25, 2004
You don't know what to expect from the voices. Anger? Hatred? Regret? Bewilderment? Then they speak, and the voices from the past are unsettling. They aren't those of actors in Roots pretending to be slaves, but those of actual slaves, all dead now, but all reflecting on when they and every member of their families were held in bondage in the United States. Fountain Hughes, who was interviewed in Baltimore in 1949 at the age of 101, proclaims: "I was born in Charlottesville, Virginia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,Sun Staff | January 25, 2004
You don't know what to expect from the voices. Anger? Hatred? Regret? Bewilderment? Then they speak, and the voices from the past are unsettling. They aren't those of actors in Roots pretending to be slaves, but those of actual slaves, all dead now, but all reflecting on when they and every member of their families were held in bondage in the United States. Fountain Hughes, who was interviewed in Baltimore in 1949 at the age of 101, proclaims: "I was born in Charlottesville, Virginia.
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TRAVEL
January 3, 1999
Following fate in Portugal; My Favorite PlaceBy Jennifer DeRoseSpecial to the SunPortugal's southern coast is packed with resorts popular with sun-starved German and English tourists, but we flew into Oporto, to the north. Touring around in a rental car, we soon felt more like time travelers than tourists. In the Portuguese countryside, peasant women still wear coarse black dresses and head scarves. In the town of Coimbra, university students proudly sport full-length black cloaks indicating their status as scholars.
TRAVEL
January 3, 1999
Following fate in Portugal; My Favorite PlaceBy Jennifer DeRoseSpecial to the SunPortugal's southern coast is packed with resorts popular with sun-starved German and English tourists, but we flew into Oporto, to the north. Touring around in a rental car, we soon felt more like time travelers than tourists. In the Portuguese countryside, peasant women still wear coarse black dresses and head scarves. In the town of Coimbra, university students proudly sport full-length black cloaks indicating their status as scholars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 9, 2001
Pen SuperShow in McLean, Va. More than 200 exhibitors from 17 countries will show, sell, buy, trade, repair and talk about a multitude of pens dating from the 1880s to the present this weekend at the Washington Pen SuperShow in McLean, Va. You'll find new, upscale and moderately priced pens created by the world's top pen makers in addition to collectible limited editions. Also, check out writing paper, pen accessories, memorabilia, old advertising curiosities, display cases, pen cases, books, magazines and gifts.
FEATURES
July 20, 1999
Be a 4Kids Detective;When you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/When did the National Hollerin' Contest begin?What info does TeenCentral ask when signing in? (Go to http://www.teencentral.net/ to find out.)When did wild bison become extinct in North America?ENDANGERED SPECIES ALERTWhales, bison and jaguars are just a few of the Earth's beautiful creatures that need your attention today. At E-Patrol: Endangered Species Alert, you'll get the lowdown on the world's animals that are threatened with extinction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | March 18, 1999
Chinese danceThe Chinese Folk Dance Company takes the stage Sunday at Towson University to present an afternoon of classical dance and music representative of China's folk culture and tradition. As dancers' colorful silk ribbons, feather fans, handkerchiefs and swords fill the air, and elaborate costumes and props fill the stage, the audience is transported into a world of myths and historical drama, with music and dance from the rural farmlands to the Imperial Palace.The Chinese Folk Dance Company is the resident dance company of the New York Chinese Cultural Center.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Slim Harrison visits Howard County's Tubman Head Start Center with musical instruments that many preschoolers have never seen, and he brings tales and songs many have never heard. He takes the children on imaginary journeys to where the instruments, stories and music originated - Latin America, Asia, Africa - keeping in mind, as he put it, "In preschool, you can't get much into that yet, because they don't even know what country we live in. " Harrison is a traditional American folk musician, storyteller and dance caller, and for the past year he has visited the Tubman Center courtesy of the Howard County Arts Council's Head Start in Art program, which provides hands-on experiences in the arts for the county's low-income families.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | December 14, 2005
The current show at Maryland Art Place, which includes a stuffed deer's head, a plaster chicken with the face of Jesus and landscape paintings festooned with odiferous discs of air freshener, brings to mind the late critic Clement Greenberg's seminal 1939 essay "Avant-Garde and Kitsch." Greenberg sought to explain how modern industrial societies had produced two radically different kinds of artwork. The first he called high culture - advanced painting and sculpture created by avant-garde artists in order to propel the possibilities of their media forward.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | April 25, 1999
More than 70 years ago, the first golf-club wielding elf was placed on an 18-hole course and the game of miniature golf was born. To celebrate, the Chattanooga Regional History Museum in Tennessee has opened a display featuring nine holes, some of which are replicated from the original Tom Thumb golf course created by Garnet Carter and all of which are open for play.The exhibit, "Putting Around: Tom Thumb Golf, A National Past-Time Sensation," also has photos and artifacts from the game's seven decades of evolution.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2004
With strains of "She'll be Coming Around the Mountain" wafting throughout the cafeteria at Bollman Bridge Elementary School, about 300 pupils stomped their feet and clapped their hands as they practiced a circle dance for the school's big hoedown. Some groups of giggly girls and boys locked arms and circled one another while Slim Harrison, a folk musician and artist-in-residence through the Maryland State Arts Council, played folk instruments, including the banjo, fiddle and guitar, at the Jessup school.
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