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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
We are approaching prime time for viewing fall foliage in the mountains of Western Maryland, according to a report Monday. Much of Garrett County has reached a "high" level of foliage color, according to the Foliage Network, with peak color likely not far behind. The network, a group that pulls foliage reports from spotters around the country, considers high color to be when 61-80 percent of leaves have changed color. Travel + Leisure magazine named the Garrett town of Oakland as the best place in the country to view changing leaves.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 25, 1994
This weekend take the time for a leisurely drive to enjoy the fall foliage -- and a house tour. Here are two suggestions:* The 39th annual Potomac Country House Tour will showcase five exceptional homes next Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Call (301) 365-2055 for information.* The Harford County Chapter of AMC Cancer Research Center's decorator show house will be open through Oct. 2. The Homestead, located at 221 Linwood Ave. in Bel Air, features the work of over 20 designers and artisans, including such well-known ones as Alexander Baer and Associates.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | August 7, 2005
I just planted hosta 'Francee.' When all the flowers are gone, do I cut the shoots back and how far? Deadheading your hosta will improve its appearance. Clip off the flower stems near the base of the plant, where the stubs will be hidden by the foliage. Removing stems diverts the plant's energy from seed production. This encourages stronger foliage growth, which is what you want in a plant such as hosta that is grown primarily for its striking foliage. My furniture is being riddled with small holes.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and By Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
Q. When my daffodils have finished blooming this spring, I would like to plant the bed with annual flowers. Can I tie up the foliage to tidy up the area and make room for the annuals? A. I would not recommend tying up the foliage for the same reason that cutting back the foliage is not recommended. The foliage is where food reserves are produced. The food is then transported to the bulb where it is stored for next year's growth. The food is produced through the process of photosynthesis.
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By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
The current run on hostas isn't quite as frenzied as the 17th-century rage for tulip bulbs, but it's impressive. Hostas are the No. 1-selling perennial in America, according to the National Perennial Plant Association, having passed daylilies four years ago. There are 44 state and regional hosta societies nationwide, with some 3,000 members; the national society, founded in 1968, is located in Minnesota.Hostas are the perfect plant for today's busy gardener; they can live for decades with minimal care and are available in enough varieties to suit nearly any garden.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2007
FALL WILL BE HERE IN A COUPLE WEEKS, AND WITH the change of season comes the transformation of the foliage. For those who plan to take the trek to see the robust colors, take a look at some newer and / or lesser-known Internet foliage resources that can take you further afield -- and answer questions like, "Why do the leaves change?" MTV SPAIN Frommer's / Wiley / $22.99 Since MTV's founding, the cable network has expanded beyond music to emphasize pop culture generally and youth culture specifically.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
Each year, robins, daffodils, and tax forms signal that we've turned a corner on winter. But when the mink-on-a-stick catkins of pussy willow (Salix caprea) swell and a pale green haze veils the cascading `hair' of weeping willow (S. babylonica), you know that spring can't be far behind. Yet in addition to advertising spring's coming attractions, willows offer - depending on variety - year-round charms. Some have bright-hued stems that add spectacular color to the winter landscape. Some, like weeping golden willow (S. alba `Tristis')
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Daily Press | November 5, 2006
Be prepared to sound like you've got mild hiccups when you say the name of the trendiest perennial. At first, the word Heuchera (pronounced HEW kuh ruh) stumbles across your tongue, but a couple of practice sessions will get you over the hump. The name honors the 18th-century German physician and botanist Johann von Heucher. Commonly called coralbells, Heucheras are low-growing plants primarily admired for their foliage. Their small white to pinkish-red flowers, produced on top of tall slim stalks, are showy in spring, especially when planted en masse.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
In case you haven't noticed, it is peak time for brilliant fall foliage colors across Maryland, according to the Foliage Network. The peak has come on strong in recent days. As of the network's Nov. 2 report, "peak" color could be found in Carroll and Frederick counties and northern Baltimore County, with "high" color to the southeast of Interstate 95. But five days later, peak color can be found across the state, according to the network's Wednesday report. Garrett and Allegany counties are meanwhile past their peak, with high or nearly complete levels of leaf shedding.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Take a drive through Maryland's countryside and you'll see that the vibrant reds, yellow and oranges of fall foliage are nearing their peak for the season. High levels of color were being reported along the Interstate 95 corridor and in points west as of Saturday, according to the Foliage Network, a group that monitors the changing of leaves across the eastern U.S. and Midwest. An updated report was expected Wednesday. The amount of leaves that have fallen are meanwhile considered low to moderate across Central Maryland, meaning that there is plenty of raking ahead, of course.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
How can I keep squirrels off my tomatoes? A very simple old-fashioned way to discourage animals, including deer, from taking a bite out of your tomatoes is to sprinkle a little lime on the fruits. Use powdered agricultural lime. It washes off easily when you harvest. You'll have to reapply after rains, so don't overdo the lime because you don't want to raise your soil pH too high. This method also can be useful on a short term basis to keep deer from eating foliage. My hedge has gotten completely bare at the bottom over the years.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 10, 2012
In an age when there are "baby apps" for the iPad and HBO is reissuing classic children's books as made-for-TV musicals, it's nice just to take the kids to visit some goats. Some hard-working, big-eating goats. My husband and I spent a weekend soloing as handlers for Mikey, the 22-month-old grandson with the halo of blond curls, and when a friend spotted a herd of goats along the side of a road, we were off. There's nothing toddlers like more than barnyard animals that are roughly the same size they are. "Goats!
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Can I cut back ornamental grasses now? The foliage of ornamental grasses is usually enjoyed throughout winter. Traditionally, it is cut back just before new growth occurs in the spring. The exception would be miscanthus, which self-seeds, making it invasive (usually the seed-grown or early-flowering varieties.) Cut these seed heads off in fall. Any other grass whose seed is becoming a problem for you can also be cut back early to prevent self-sowing. Cutting huge old clumps of ornamental grass can be an onerous job. Some gardeners use a bungee cord to encircle the stems tightly, then cut them with a chain saw or electric hedge clippers.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetis hippodromehatter@aol.com | November 3, 2011
As trees and shrubs start to flaunt their fall foliage, there's one shrub - the burning bush - that's certain to turn heads with its three-week-long display of bright-scarlet leaves that are so vivid the shrubs look like living fireballs. How burning bushes got their genus name, Euonymus, is rooted in Greek mythology. Euonyme, you see, was Earth's mother. She was also the mother of the Three Furies, angry deities who avenged the victims of crimes when their wrongdoers went unpunished, relentlessly pursuing perpetrators to the ends of the Earth.
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By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | April 7, 2007
Last year I put charcoal-grill ashes on my vegetable garden and had the worst yield ever. I thought ashes made good fertilizer. Charcoal, unlike wood ashes, may contain coal. Coal and treated-lumber ash are toxic. Check charcoal bags for ingredients. Ashes from wood are fine for raising soil pH. About half the strength of lime, they also add potassium, phosphate and boron. Checklist Sow peas and continue to plant succession crops of spinach, beets, lettuce and radishes. Allow the foliage to die back naturally on spring-flowering bulbs.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 16, 1999
September's rains helped salvage the leaf-peeping season after the dry summer.Throughout the foliage season, numerous hot lines provide daily or weekly updates on color progression.For nationwide foliage updates from the U.S. Forest Service, call (800) 354-4595.For individual states:Connecticut: (800) CT-BOUND; www.ctbound.orgDelaware: (800) 441-8846; www.state.de.us/tourismMaine: (888) MAINE-45; www.visitmaine.comMaryland: (800) 532-8371; www.mdisfun.orgMassachusetts: (800) 227-MASS; www.massvacation.
FEATURES
By Sandy Alexander, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Fall in the Mid-Atlantic region offers a break from the summer humidity, a pause before the cold, gray winter, and lots of great scenery. It's a perfect opportunity to get outdoors for some exercise that doesn't feel like a chore. Whether it is a peaceful walk to watch birds take flight or a hair-raising zip-line ride among the tree tops, these five activities offer an opportunity to put some fresh air and foliage into your fitness routine. Hike Old Rag As the Ridge Trail on Shenandoah's Old Rag mountain rises more than 2,500 feet, a steep rock scramble near the top requires hikers to "climb, slide, shimmy and crawl" over the boulders, according to the National Park Service.
TRAVEL
By Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
While the Pocono Mountain region is a popular vacation destination year-round, it is particularly beguiling in autumn, when cool weather brings crackling leaves, hay mazes, craft fairs and cozy fireplaces in country inns. "Fall is huge," said Gillian Moore of the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau. The geology of the sprawling 2,400-square-mile Poconos region in northeastern Pennsylvania means the blaze of fall foliage peaks at different times in three distinct zones, so there's more time to savor the reds and oranges.
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