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By Carl Schoettler | April 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Richard Ford's novel "Independence Day" received the 1996 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, it was announced yesterday. This is the second major award in as many weeks for the book, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week.Judges Thomas Flanagan, Francisco Goldman and Joanne Meschery chose Mr. Ford's novel from five finalists, including "All Souls' Rising" by Madison Smartt Bell; "The Good Negress" by A. J. Verdelle; "The Tunnel" by William H. Gass; and "When the World Was Steady" by Claire Messud.
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By Clarence Page | October 31, 2013
Observing Washington politics close-up has given me a new appreciation of Shakespeare. Now I see where he got his ideas. "Today, you could say that almost all of our political rhetoric, comes from two books from the 16th and 17th centuries: the King James Bible and Shakespeare's plays," Michael Witmore, director of Folger Shakespeare Library, told me last year. I recently talked to Mr. Witmore again at the 71-year-old independent research library and theater, which sits only a block east of the Capitol.
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By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
For many, the Shakespearean experience begins and ends with a fleeting glimpse of Hamlet or Macbeth in high school. The bard seems firmly relegated to academe, his eloquent writings reserved for the scholarly and learned elite - much to the relief of those of us who struggle to distinguish a thee from a thou. Well, the pupils at Clemens Crossing Elementary School have news for you - Shakespeare is for kids, too. Last week, a troupe of fourth- and fifth-graders performed a 20-minute portion of A Midsummer Night's Dream in its original language at Folger Shakespeare Library Theatre in Washington as part of the 23rd Emily Jordan Folger Children's Shakespeare Festival.
EXPLORE
April 15, 2013
"Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," a traveling exhibition opening at the Hays-Heighe House at Harford Community College on Monday, April 22, celebrates the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible and examines its fascinating and complex history. The traveling exhibit, which runs through May 17, consists of high-quality reproductions of rare and historic books, manuscripts and works of art from the Folger and Bodleian collections, combined with interpretive text and related images.
EXPLORE
April 15, 2013
"Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible," a traveling exhibition opening at the Hays-Heighe House at Harford Community College on Monday, April 22, celebrates the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Bible and examines its fascinating and complex history. The traveling exhibit, which runs through May 17, consists of high-quality reproductions of rare and historic books, manuscripts and works of art from the Folger and Bodleian collections, combined with interpretive text and related images.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
It was Shakespeare's Macbeth, all right, but the king wore black high-top basketball shoes.Yesterday, at Center Stage, the third-graders from Mount Washington Elementary School captured the elements of what is perhaps William Shakespeare's most noted tragedy.The images included masked murderers, apparitions, haunting witches, and an impatient and infuriated Lady Macbeth.But the performance of William Hall, 8, one of two actors who portrayed Macbeth, stood out."It was hard remembering some of the lines," William said with sincere conviction both before and after the lively 15-minute performance of the third and fourth acts of Macbeth.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
When it comes to mayhem, the Ninja Turtles have nothing on William Shakespeare.Consider these scenes acted out by students in a classroom at Harford Heights Elementary School in Baltimore yesterday:* Three witches dressed in black, chanting spells over a caldron.* A king stabbed to death in his sleep by a power-mad nobleman.* A bloody ghost at a banquet table, confronting his murderous host.* The dead villain's gory head stuck on a pike.Written and performed as popular entertainment, Shakespeare's plays often wrap universal truth in drama exciting enough to grab the most television-sated 10-year-old.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2005
William Shakespeare will be one of the most celebrated dignitaries in the nation's capital when more than 20 organizations collaborate on a six-month, citywide Shakespeare in Washington festival in 2007. The festival, announced at the Folger Shakespeare Library yesterday, will run from January through June. Participants range from Washington institutions such as the Shakespeare Theatre, Washington National Opera and Kennedy Center to international companies such as the Kirov Ballet and the Royal Shakespeare Company.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1998
BRYANT WOODS resident Nancy Berla spent several years during the 1980s writing about parental involvement in schools.When she retired a few years ago, she decided to put her ideas into practice by volunteering at her grandchildren's school, Running Brook Elementary.The school's administrators consider her such as asset that they nominated her for a Daily Points of Light Award, a national honor that recognizes outstanding volunteers.L Berla was featured on the Points of Light Web site April 30.Students and staff honored her at a ceremony at the school last month.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 31, 2013
Observing Washington politics close-up has given me a new appreciation of Shakespeare. Now I see where he got his ideas. "Today, you could say that almost all of our political rhetoric, comes from two books from the 16th and 17th centuries: the King James Bible and Shakespeare's plays," Michael Witmore, director of Folger Shakespeare Library, told me last year. I recently talked to Mr. Witmore again at the 71-year-old independent research library and theater, which sits only a block east of the Capitol.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2005
William Shakespeare will be one of the most celebrated dignitaries in the nation's capital when more than 20 organizations collaborate on a six-month, citywide Shakespeare in Washington festival in 2007. The festival, announced at the Folger Shakespeare Library yesterday, will run from January through June. Participants range from Washington institutions such as the Shakespeare Theatre, Washington National Opera and Kennedy Center to international companies such as the Kirov Ballet and the Royal Shakespeare Company.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 1, 2003
Maxwell Anderson's 1930 verse play, Elizabeth the Queen, explores a number of intriguing issues: Whether it is more courageous to wage peace than war, whether women rule more wisely than men, and whether power is a stronger impulse than love. At its core, however, the play is a study of two characters, Elizabeth I and the Earl of Essex. Individually, these two were extremely complex figures, which made their emotional attachment all more complicated. And, from his use of verse to his inclusion of a Shakespearean play-within-a-play, Anderson appears to have been striving to create a drama of Shakespearean scope.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
For many, the Shakespearean experience begins and ends with a fleeting glimpse of Hamlet or Macbeth in high school. The bard seems firmly relegated to academe, his eloquent writings reserved for the scholarly and learned elite - much to the relief of those of us who struggle to distinguish a thee from a thou. Well, the pupils at Clemens Crossing Elementary School have news for you - Shakespeare is for kids, too. Last week, a troupe of fourth- and fifth-graders performed a 20-minute portion of A Midsummer Night's Dream in its original language at Folger Shakespeare Library Theatre in Washington as part of the 23rd Emily Jordan Folger Children's Shakespeare Festival.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - To say it is a quirky place is to understate the existence of the International Speedway Corp. Archives. It houses more than 2.5 million racing photos, slides and negatives and nearly 180,000 hours of videos from major auto racing events throughout the 20th century. It is simply stuffed with history, loaded with aging treats. It is to auto racing what the Folger Shakespeare Library is to scholarly research on Shakespeare, what the Kennedy Library is to those who want to know more about the John F. Kennedy presidency and what the Library of Congress is to historians researching the federal government.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1998
BRYANT WOODS resident Nancy Berla spent several years during the 1980s writing about parental involvement in schools.When she retired a few years ago, she decided to put her ideas into practice by volunteering at her grandchildren's school, Running Brook Elementary.The school's administrators consider her such as asset that they nominated her for a Daily Points of Light Award, a national honor that recognizes outstanding volunteers.L Berla was featured on the Points of Light Web site April 30.Students and staff honored her at a ceremony at the school last month.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | April 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Richard Ford's novel "Independence Day" received the 1996 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, it was announced yesterday. This is the second major award in as many weeks for the book, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week.Judges Thomas Flanagan, Francisco Goldman and Joanne Meschery chose Mr. Ford's novel from five finalists, including "All Souls' Rising" by Madison Smartt Bell; "The Good Negress" by A. J. Verdelle; "The Tunnel" by William H. Gass; and "When the World Was Steady" by Claire Messud.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 1, 2003
Maxwell Anderson's 1930 verse play, Elizabeth the Queen, explores a number of intriguing issues: Whether it is more courageous to wage peace than war, whether women rule more wisely than men, and whether power is a stronger impulse than love. At its core, however, the play is a study of two characters, Elizabeth I and the Earl of Essex. Individually, these two were extremely complex figures, which made their emotional attachment all more complicated. And, from his use of verse to his inclusion of a Shakespearean play-within-a-play, Anderson appears to have been striving to create a drama of Shakespearean scope.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 24, 1993
The sword fights are cool. Death scenes are even more fun. And boy, are there some great curses.But the kissing scenes -- definitely "too mushy."That's the assessment of Shakespeare from some fourth-graders at Gardenville Elementary School in northeast Baltimore. Members of Carol Dezes' gifted and talented class, these 9- and 10-year-olds have been immersed in Shakespeare for the past two months -- and have had a ball through it all.One class member, Ashley Ward, in fact, recently won a poster contest for schoolchildren in the Washington-Baltimore area sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 24, 1993
The sword fights are cool. Death scenes are even more fun. And boy, are there some great curses.But the kissing scenes -- definitely "too mushy."That's the assessment of Shakespeare from some fourth-graders at Gardenville Elementary School in northeast Baltimore. Members of Carol Dezes' gifted and talented class, these 9- and 10-year-olds have been immersed in Shakespeare for the past two months -- and have had a ball through it all.One class member, Ashley Ward, in fact, recently won a poster contest for schoolchildren in the Washington-Baltimore area sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
It was Shakespeare's Macbeth, all right, but the king wore black high-top basketball shoes.Yesterday, at Center Stage, the third-graders from Mount Washington Elementary School captured the elements of what is perhaps William Shakespeare's most noted tragedy.The images included masked murderers, apparitions, haunting witches, and an impatient and infuriated Lady Macbeth.But the performance of William Hall, 8, one of two actors who portrayed Macbeth, stood out."It was hard remembering some of the lines," William said with sincere conviction both before and after the lively 15-minute performance of the third and fourth acts of Macbeth.
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