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September 5, 2004
On September 3, 2004, FOLGER "Buddy" BROOKS of Perryville, MD. Beloved husband of Ella Sue Brooks (nee Wade). Devoted father of Harvey Lee Brooks, Tina Dianne Murphy, and Patricia Lynn Brooks. Loving son of Bertha Estelle Holcomb Brooks and the late Harvey Lee Brooks. Brother of Marie Lester and Rachel Johnson. Also survived by two grandchildren Kevin Brooks and Timothy Murphy and will also be missed by his four legged companions Sydney, Maggie and Inky. Services will be held in the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Tuesday, September 7, 2004, at 10 A.M. Interment will be in Harford Memorial Gardens, Aberdeen, MD. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire may contribute to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 572, Bel Air, MD 21014.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra could have included just a little sample of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" to go with its latest program, which includes the overture and incidental music Mendelssohn wrote under the spell of that play. But this is an all-out production, and a beguiling one at that. Created in association with Washington's superb Folger Theatre, the semi-staged presentation, cleverly adapted and directed by Edward Berkeley, provides a generous helping of "Midsummer.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 5, 1990
Washington---As recently as Paul Robeson's day, it was considered daring to cast a black actor in the title role of Shakespeare's "Othello." That practice is virtually the norm today. But at the Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger, director Harold Scott has added another twist -- he has also cast a black actor as Iago, the trusted ensign who incites the Moor's fatal jealousy.It is an inspired choice, and not merely because of Andre Braugher's carefully calculated performance as Iago. One problem with this great tragedy is that it's difficult to understand why Iago succeeds so rapidly in convincing Othello -- a military general who is presumably a good judge of character -- that his young Venetian bride, Desdemona, has been unfaithful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Updated stagings of "Romeo and Juliet" are neither new nor necessarily revelatory, but an imaginative one can make you see and feel the tragedy in a fresh, stronger light, can sweep you up into that fateful vortex where young love collides with stubborn pride and absurd grudges. Folger Theatre's season-opening production succeeds awfully well at doing just that. Directed with a vibrant touch by Aaron Posner, the play gets an essentially American treatment in terms of accent and attitude (if actors inserted a "like" or "you know" into every sentence, it wouldn't seem all that out of place)
FEATURES
By Marissa Lowman and Marissa Lowman,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
The tale of a dutiful son turned well-meaning forger ultimately felled by vanity is the stuff of Shakespeare. It's but one of the fascinating stories told by Fakes, Forgeries & Facsimiles, an exhibit of all things pseudo-Bard at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington. There's a note from Queen Elizabeth I to Shakespeare. A letter from William to a lover that includes a lock of hair claimed to be Shakespeare's own. Portraits and plays. All bogus. Library curators Erin Blake, Rachel Doggett and Heather Wolfe worked on the exhibit on and off for eight months.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | December 28, 2004
After 400 years, the letters have turned brown and become brittle. They almost seem to be returning to their bark origins. The talk in them is of recipes and love, muscle aches and household accounts, and the occasional royal conspiracy. Every grease spot and inkblot, every broken seal and crumbling bit of ribbon reveals much and conceals more. There are roughly 80 of these missives showcased in Letterwriting in Renaissance England, an enchanting exhibit running through April 2 at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole Mccauley and Mary Carole Mccauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The large, extravagant handwriting has more ruffles and curlicues than a Christmas package, and it practically shouts self-confidence: "Thys Boke If Myne." This book is mine. And then he signs it, with a capital "P" for "Prince" so tall and plump that it dwarfs all the other letters on the page - as he seems to have believed that he dwarfed all other mortals. Could any inscription be more revealing? Could it possibly tell us more about the personality of that budding adolescent who later would become England's King Henry VIII?
FEATURES
January 23, 2007
Theater De Shields plays `Lear' in Washington Baltimore native and two-time Tony Award nominee Andre de Shields has the title role in Shakespeare's King Lear at 7:30 p.m. at the Folger Theatre, 201 E. Capitol St. S.E., Wash ington. The play is co-produced by the Classical Theatre of Har lem. Tickets are $25-$50. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu/theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Her shrewdness, singular appearance and sheer staying power have kept Elizabeth I alive in movies, plays and books for four centuries since her death in 1603. To celebrate her enduring hold on popular imagination, the Folger Shakespeare Li-brary is offering a series of events this spring and summer including an exhibition, a play and concerts. The Folger's collection of Eliza-bethan items, amassed by the library's founders, Henry Clay Folger and his wife, Emily Jordan Folger, is the largest outside Britain.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
On November 3, 2004, RONALD E. "SONNY" WISHARD, SR.; beloved husband of June Gribben Wishard; loving father of Susan Roberts and Ronald Wishard, Jr.; stepfather of Michael Folger and his wife Carolyn, Keith Folger, Julia Dilworth and Bruce Blaney. Also survived by five grandchildren and his sister Patsy Pindell. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Thursday and Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where Funeral Services will be held Saturday, 11 A.M. Interment to immediately follow services in the Meadowridge Memorial Park, Elkridge.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Generations ago, Baltimore poet Folger McKinsey wrote "Charles Street in the Fall" about a stroll through the city. On Saturday, his descendents gathered for their 100th reunion, where they ate, played games and celebrated their heritage. "It's neat that this will carry on," said organizer and distant relative Glenn Opperman Sr. of New Jersey. Wearing turn-of-the-century garb to commemorate the centennial, Opperman, 60, said, "We're all afraid to say, 'This is it.'" On Saturday, the extended family gathered at Brandywine Springs State Park, site of the first family picnic in 1910, to continue the legacy and to remember the past.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Children poured out of the doors of Folger McKinsey Elementary School, eagerly presenting their mothers paintings and paper birds that they had made. But some of the children were showing off another item they had collected during the day - bottles of hand sanitizer. Dismissal time at the Severna Park elementary school, where one pupil was identified as likely having swine flu, was subdued Thursday afternoon because nearly half the students did not come to school. But parents who were picking up their children said that they were not very worried, even as the White House announced that an Anne Arundel County man who recently traveled to Mexico in advance of President Barack Obama also probably has swine flu, as do three members of his family.
FEATURES
January 23, 2007
Theater De Shields plays `Lear' in Washington Baltimore native and two-time Tony Award nominee Andre de Shields has the title role in Shakespeare's King Lear at 7:30 p.m. at the Folger Theatre, 201 E. Capitol St. S.E., Wash ington. The play is co-produced by the Classical Theatre of Har lem. Tickets are $25-$50. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu/theatre.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 21, 2007
King Lear's youngest daughter, modest Cordelia, launches full steam into physical combat. Lear, at the height of his madness, slays his devoted Fool. And Lear's middle daughter murders her husband. These examples of directorial license typify the raw, muscular nature of Alfred Preisser's production of Shakespeare's tragedy at the Folger Theatre, where it is one of the first offerings in the six-month Shakespeare in Washington festival. KING LEAR / / Through Feb. 18 at the Folger Theatre, 201 E. Capitol St. S.E., Washington -- $25-$50 -- 202-544-7077 or folger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2007
THEATER 'LEAR' IN MESOPOTAMIA In one of the first offerings in the six-month Shakespeare in Washington festival, Baltimore native and two-time Tony Award nominee Andre de Shields tackles one of Shakespeare's most daunting roles -- aging, misguided King Lear. The co-production with the Classical Theatre of Harlem opens tonight at Washington's Folger Theatre after engagements in New York and Miami. Director Alfred Preisser transposes his King Lear to Mesopotamia at the time of the Code of Hammurabi.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 8, 2006
Shakespeare in Washington Move over, Stratford-Upon-Avon, England. Make way, Stratford, Ontario. Washington will be the international Shakespeare hub for the first six months of 2007. That's when the city hosts "Shakespeare in Washington," a multidisciplinary festival featuring plays, films, operas, concerts and exhibits by almost 50 organizations ranging from Russia's Kirov Ballet to New York's Tiny Ninja Theater and Washington's National Building Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2007
THEATER 'LEAR' IN MESOPOTAMIA In one of the first offerings in the six-month Shakespeare in Washington festival, Baltimore native and two-time Tony Award nominee Andre de Shields tackles one of Shakespeare's most daunting roles -- aging, misguided King Lear. The co-production with the Classical Theatre of Harlem opens tonight at Washington's Folger Theatre after engagements in New York and Miami. Director Alfred Preisser transposes his King Lear to Mesopotamia at the time of the Code of Hammurabi.
NEWS
July 26, 1996
Virginia Christine, 76, a character actress who portrayed the motherly Mrs. Olson in Folger's coffee television commercials for 22 years, died Wednesday of heart complications in Los Angeles.She was best known as Mrs. Olson, a smiling, likable Swedish woman, who was always ready to bring happiness to young married couples by brewing them a cup of "mountain-grown" Folger's.After making her motion picture debut in the 1943 movie, "Edge of Darkness," she performed in more than 400 films and television productions.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
The nearly 600 pupils at Folger McKinsey Elementary School certainly were excited when the school's National Blue Ribbon flag was unveiled - cheering and clapping and pumping their little fists in the air as they sang the school's "We Rock, We Rule" anthem. But the pupils sounded most excited when it was announced that they would each be getting a doughnut with red, white and blue sprinkles with their lunch Monday as a reward. They'd earned the treats. The U.S. Department of Education named Folger McKinsey a National Blue Ribbon School - a designation also earned by five other Maryland schools last year.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
An informal poll of students in advanced English class at Edgewood High School recently revealed that many of them recognize the passage "All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players." But a majority of the seniors couldn't identify that it comes from As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Whether a passion for Shakespeare is meant to be, Beth Hoffman, who teaches the class, said she worries about whether students are getting enough Shakespeare, which bolsters her determination to make sure they leave school with more than a rudimentary knowledge of his work.
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