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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
If you reach for a napkin at the Westminster Inn, or a towel at the East End Athletic Club, you will likely be unfurling something Juanita A. Haines' carefully folded.Haines, 26, this month celebrates her second anniversary in a housekeeping job at the inn. She landed the job with the help of Carroll Haven, an agency that coaches developmentally disabled adults to get paying jobs at local businesses.She doesn't talk much to new acquaintances, but Haines smiles andsays she likes her job. As she gives a quick tour of the inn, it's hard to keep up with her spirited pace up and down the stairs and hallways.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The worlds of pop and classical music do not meet all that often — or all that well, as a rule — but certain artists have proved quite adept at bridging the gap. Ben Folds is one of them. The Winston-Salem, N.C.-born, Nashville-based songwriter and pianist has been on an international tour billed as the Ben Folds Orchestra Experience. The tour brings him to Charm City on Thursday for a concert with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which first joined Folds in a gig nine years ago. That 2005 program featured Folds songs enhanced with orchestral arrangements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Murphy and Kate Murphy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2005
Most schoolchildren know how to fold a page like this one into a hat or a boat. But while many consider it mere child's play, more and more artists are creating startlingly original origami that transcend the humble craft. While adhering to the basic rule of leaving the starting sheet of paper intact (no cutting!), origami artists are more than merely talented folders, asserts Paul Jackson, who lives outside Tel Aviv. His so-called one crease series of works, a sort of a minimalist origami, has an animated quality, as if the paper were contorted by and floating in the wind.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
A few years ago physicists Rod Hyde and Sham Dixit set out to design a space telescope big enough to study planets outside our solar system. But the duo, who work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, quickly hit a major snag: How would they get their mammoth instrument into space? To see planets so far away, the scientists figured the telescope would require a lens at least 160 feet in diameter. Trouble is, NASA's biggest moving van can hold objects only about a tenth that size.
SPORTS
August 12, 2006
Good morning --Rhett Butler -- Apparently, you know when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em.
NEWS
June 7, 2000
In many parts of the world, spring is a time to celebrate the end of the cold dark days of winter. Spring and summer are exciting and colorful seasons when people welcome new life and celebrate the outdoors. There are many Baltimore traditions connected with these seasons. The Farmers' Markets and baseball are some of Baltimore's favorite warm weather events! Many people celebrate their joy in the coming of spring and summer by wearing colorful party hats. Hat's off to warmer summer ! Let's celebrate the seasons by making an old-fashioned party hat!
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 11, 1995
The Rouse Company could finance its own improvements to Harborplace just by charging admission. Striking transport workers called a mass demonstration in the heart of Paris but, alas, could not get there. If the Grinch doesn't fold, Bill will produce a fourth budget. At last, Jupiter has a man-made moon.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | August 31, 1994
Q: After browning hamburger or making a roast of meat, I pour off the fat into a bowl and refrigerate it. Later when I scoop out the coagulated fat, there is a gelatin which I assume is the meat juice. Is this gelatin good for anything besides enriching a gravy?A: You are correct in assuming that the flavorful gelatin is the meat juice plus the added protein from the cooked meat, which causes it to congeal when cold.Aside from enriching gravy, use this flavorful stock for soups, as a sauce flavoring, as a fortifier for pasta sauces or even to spice up tomato or vegetable juice.
NEWS
By Joanne Trestrail and Joanne Trestrail,Chicago Tribune | February 20, 1994
Title: "The Fermata"Author: Nicholson BakerPublisher: Random House-! Length, price: 305 pages, $20One way to talk about Nicholson Baker's books is in terms of their subject matter, and that's easy. "The Mezzanine" (1986), his heavily footnoted first novel, follows an office worker through his lunch hour as he buys shoelaces, uses the men's room, rides escalators and ponders his stapler. The second, "Room Temperature," tracks a father's thoughts as he sits by a window holding his sleeping 6-month-old daughter.
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | April 17, 2014
The debacle regarding film tax credits at the recent legislative session could potentially cause Maryland to lose one of the finest TV programs around today, and all because of misunderstanding of an industry and reliance on failed history. "House of Cards," the Netflix series starring Kevin Spacey, has been filmed in Maryland for each of its first two seasons, mostly in Baltimore City and Harford County. But a failed negotiation between the House and Senate this legislative session left the show in limbo when $3.5 million in tax incentives were left out of a final bill subsidizing the film industry.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- In today's Baltimore Sun, I gave a projected Orioles Opening Day lineup now that the club has added designated hitter/outfielder Nelson Cruz as a middle-of-the order bat. Here was my batting order, as it ran in the paper today: Nick Markakis RF: The favorite to assume leadoff position after hitting .335 in that spot in 2012 Manny Machado 3B: Lineup shifts if Machado has not recovered from knee surgery by Opening Day ...
NEWS
February 22, 2014
David Kulick ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 20) sounds like the kind of guy who cannot wait to park his car in a space dug out by his neighbor. I live in a townhouse development on a public street. When a plow came through, it left a 3-foot-high wall of snow between my car and the street. Giving due care to my 67-year-old heart, I dug out my car, as did most, but not all, of my neighbors. When I left the house to run an errand, I was not about to give up to someone else, whether neighbor or visitor, the space I worked so hard to create.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013
Beyonce has chosen to go with a new pixie cut, a Russian man has sued a bank after they refuesed to honor the (modified) contract they signed, and the email provider previously used by former Marylander Edward Snowden has shut down under what appears to be a mysterious gag order. Welcome to your trends report for August 9, 2013. Trending now What: Beyonce Haircut Where: Google search Why: This latest move may mark her continued foray into the land of androgyny and general boss-itude.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
"Lady, like I I've been trying to tell you, this ain't your gnocchi. " For the Little Italy Open Air Film Festival premiere of "The Godfather," Amicci's is offering door-to-chair service. All you gotta do is this. 1. Pick up a menu at the Film Festival, 2. Call Amiccis with your damn order. You can pre-pay with your credit card or have exact amount in cash 3. Tell Amiccis where you're seated and they will bring your order to you. The full menu is on ammici.com, and bottled soda and water will also be available.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Michelle Ostroff sees opportunities for the Jewish Federation of Howard County - to reach more people by diving into social media, to better engage teenagers and to make a popular speaker series more inspiring. Ostroff is the new executive director of the federation, only the second full-time director the small organization has had. The organization not only helps the county's Jewish groups but holds programs throughout the community, coordinates events and is involved in charitable endeavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Interview by Lisa Pollak | July 27, 2003
Janet Henry, 61, of Glen Burnie, was recently chosen "Maid of the Year" by The Maids Home Services, which employs more than 3,000 maids in the United States and Canada. I like my job. It's going to sound brazen, but I'm good at what I do. When I go into a house, I want it done right. I'm the team leader. We work in teams of four. If something isn't done to my liking, I'll tell the person who's doing it: 'You've got to do it better.' " Today one of the women was vacuuming a laundry room.
FEATURES
By Ladies' Home Journal | June 9, 1994
Store your winter wardrobe properly, and you'll get a lot more mileage out of your clothing, says Ladies' Home Journal magazine.Follow these tips from Shirley Eng, museum conservator for the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City:* Clean clothing before storing. Many insects, especially moths, thrive on food stains.* You shouldn't store clothing in a plastic dry-cleaner bag. These bags can trap moisture, which may cause mildew. A better option is a cloth bag or old pillowcase with a hole cut on top for the hanger.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
A trustee will run Alter Communications Inc., publisher of the Baltimore Jewish Times, a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge ordered late Friday after determining the company had exhausted all avenues to reorganize under Chapter 11. U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Nancy V. Alquist rejected an 11th-hour bid that Alter and its attorneys said could prevent the 93-year-old Jewish Times from folding as soon as next week. Under Alter's proposal, presented in court Friday, Washington Jewish Week publisher WJW Group LLC was prepared to make a formal offer for Alter's assets by Monday and close the deal by Wednesday in time to allow the weekly magazine to publish Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Creperie Breizh, an "authentic French creperie on wheels," has pulled over after 14 months on the roads. News of the closing was posted Wednesday on the truck's Facebook page. "We are sorry to tell everyone that we are closing Creperie Breizh, we both decided to do other things and we are putting our crepe truck for sale," the message said. The truck's owners were Missy and Eric Coatrieux, who both have backgrounds in the horse world. Missy was an equestrian; Eric, a native of Brittany, trained racehorses. Breizh is the Breton (Celtic)
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