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Foie Gras

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2006
CHICAGO --Yesterday, this city's lawbreakers were serving foie gras. The illicit substance could be spotted in places it was rarely seen when it was legal: buried in Chicago's famed deep-dish pizza, in soul food on the South Side, beside beef downtown. In one of the more unlikely (and opulent) demonstrations of civil disobedience, a handful of restaurants here that never carry foie gras, the fattened livers of ducks and geese, featured it on the very day that Chicago became the first city in the nation to outlaw its sale.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Halloween night, most caldrons will be filled with candy. But the ones on the stove might be filled with bones (cue creepy music). The holiday aside, in this era of nose-to-tail dining, adding "bones" to the shopping list doesn't seem unusual — nor should it. Dogs know what humans should: Bones are nutritious and delicious. Cooking with bones is as old as cooking itself. In the "appetizers and snacks" section of "Le Guide Culinaire," published in 1903, the famed French chef Auguste Escoffier included a simple recipe for grilled sirloin bones: "Sprinkle them with cayenne," he advised.
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NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | May 2, 2009
A Columbia restaurant that was vandalized twice in three weeks in late March and mid-April because of foie gras on its menu was the scene of a peaceful protest Friday. About 15 people representing the Humane League of Baltimore stood in front of the Iron Bridge Wine Co. on Route 108 wearing T-shirts that read "Got Compassion?" in reaction to the restaurant's servers being adorned in T-shirts reading "Got Foie Gras?" The six-year-old Howard County restaurant has been at the center of a running debate about serving the popular French delicacy made from the fattened livers of geese and ducks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | August 30, 2012
Curtis introduces the Quickfire with the absolute worst two words any high schooler has ever used to start an essay: "Throughout history," (insert my inner English major gouging out her eyes here). The challenge? Make a sexy dish using ingredients known for their aphrodisiac qualities. Guest judge is burlesque star Dita Von Teese. The chefs go gaga, even the ones that don't like girls. The six remaining chefs have 30 minutes to create something mouth watering and toe curling.  Within seconds, there are two triumphant crashes as two blenders fall to the floor and shatter.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 31, 2007
For a week in France, they sampled foie gras and black truffles, sipped wine from barrels and analyzed menus and the composition of countless dishes. This was no vacation for seven management staff and chefs at Baltimore's French-inspired Petit Louis Bistro and Charleston restaurants. Instead, it was hands-on education paid for by Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf, husband-and-wife restaurateurs, who took their staff on the trip to two French wine regions this month. "It's one thing to read something in the food and wine business, it's another to taste, smell, hear and look," said Wolf, owner and executive chef of the Charleston Group, the Baltimore enterprise that operates a wine store and three local restaurants.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
A Howard County restaurant that was vandalized last month in an apparent protest against the serving of foie gras has been hit again. Steve Wecker, co-owner of the Iron Bridge Wine Company in Columbia, said Monday that no references were made this time to foie gras. But Wecker suspects that the vandals who broke a window and damaged one of the front doors of the Route 108 property were trying to convey the same message as those who spray-painted "Get rid of the foie gras" while breaking several windows and gluing the lock of the front door March 23. No one has been charged in that incident, police said Since the first incident, which caused an estimated $3,300 in damage, Wecker has added "Foie Gras Friday" to the restaurant's menu and has servers wearing T-shirts reading "Got Foie Gras?"
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2008
The seared something balances atop a scallop, the quintessence of culinary refinement and elegant dining - and the cause of so much trouble. It is foie gras, a velvet-textured delicacy loved by some gourmets. And it presents a provocation to certain animal rights activists. Only days ago, it brought a dozen yelling, sign-wielding protesters to the doorstep of Kali's Court, a Fells Point restaurant that features it on its menu. The taste of foie gras - "fat liver" in French - isn't the problem.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 5, 2008
Foie gras, French for fatty liver, is either a signature ingredient at white-tablecloth restaurants - or the most abject form of animal cruelty and unhealthy to boot. Animal lovers and health advocates squared off yesterday against white-jacketed chefs and restaurant owners over whether Maryland should ban the sale of the delicacy because of what ducks and geese must endure to produce it. But the emotional clash before a Senate committee in Annapolis lost some bite when the chief sponsor of the bill to outlaw trafficking in the high-price food unexpectedly announced she was leaning against going through with the legislation.
NEWS
By Rone Tempest and Rone Tempest,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2003
SONOMA, Calif. - Michael Bilger, chef at the tony Restaurant Caneros, has it on his Christmas menu: "Seared foie gras with persimmon bread pudding and pomegranate gastrique." Carlo-Alessandro Cavallo, owner and chef at the celebrated Sonoma Meritage restaurant, likes to serve his foie gras northern Italian-style, wrapped in ravioli and drenched in a white truffle butter-and-sage sauce. Both chefs were steamed this month when animal-rights advocates presented the Sonoma City Council with a petition to ban the sale of foie gras in this California capital of wine and haute cuisine.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
Jean Poholsky looks forward to dining at Iron Bridge Wine Co. for the upscale ambience as well as for the food. So when she arrived at the Columbia restaurant for lunch with friends Monday, she was shocked to see glass shards covering a stone walkway that had been spray-painted in red with the words "Get rid of the foie gras." An admitted lover of the French delicacy made from the livers of ducks and geese, Poholsky concurred with the restaurant's owners that whoever was responsible for the overnight vandalism could have expressed their opinion differently.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
The crouton in Marie Louise Bistro's duck salad became key evidence in a mystery that, if anything, made remarkable lunch fare that much more intriguing. 12:40 p.m. The bistro has four outdoor tables we passed on because of the heat. The door opens to a cafe setting with a case displaying pasta and pastries and other goodies that we lingered over for a minute before we were greeted and seated in the first floor dining area. Above us, a loft with bar is the fourth distinct section.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | May 2, 2009
A Columbia restaurant that was vandalized twice in three weeks in late March and mid-April because of foie gras on its menu was the scene of a peaceful protest Friday. About 15 people representing the Humane League of Baltimore stood in front of the Iron Bridge Wine Co. on Route 108 wearing T-shirts that read "Got Compassion?" in reaction to the restaurant's servers being adorned in T-shirts reading "Got Foie Gras?" The six-year-old Howard County restaurant has been at the center of a running debate about serving the popular French delicacy made from the fattened livers of geese and ducks.
NEWS
April 20, 2009
Smith didn't stop tax bills from rising Every year for the past six years, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. has submitted a budget that spends more than the previous year ("Balto. County avoids budget blues," April 15). And every year, Mr. Smith claims, and the media dutifully report, that his budget holds the line on property taxes. What Mr. Smith refuses to acknowledge and the media often fail to report is that although the property tax rate has remained the same, the amount of tax that many homeowners pay has increased 4 percent a year each year Mr. Smith has been in office.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
A Howard County restaurant that was vandalized last month in an apparent protest against the serving of foie gras has been hit again. Steve Wecker, co-owner of the Iron Bridge Wine Company in Columbia, said Monday that no references were made this time to foie gras. But Wecker suspects that the vandals who broke a window and damaged one of the front doors of the Route 108 property were trying to convey the same message as those who spray-painted "Get rid of the foie gras" while breaking several windows and gluing the lock of the front door March 23. No one has been charged in that incident, police said Since the first incident, which caused an estimated $3,300 in damage, Wecker has added "Foie Gras Friday" to the restaurant's menu and has servers wearing T-shirts reading "Got Foie Gras?"
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
Jean Poholsky looks forward to dining at Iron Bridge Wine Co. for the upscale ambience as well as for the food. So when she arrived at the Columbia restaurant for lunch with friends Monday, she was shocked to see glass shards covering a stone walkway that had been spray-painted in red with the words "Get rid of the foie gras." An admitted lover of the French delicacy made from the livers of ducks and geese, Poholsky concurred with the restaurant's owners that whoever was responsible for the overnight vandalism could have expressed their opinion differently.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 5, 2008
Here are 10 great restaurant duck dishes. Note that the restaurants are in alphabetical order: 1 Charred rare duck breast paired with duck confit at Abacrombie near the Meyerhoff 2 Duck meatballs with braised cabbage, bacon, apples and Calvados sauce at the Brewer's Art in Mount Vernon 3 Pan-roasted duck breast, roasted root vegetables, speckled butter beans at Charleston in Harbor East 4 Smooth but assertive duck liver pate at Clementine in...
NEWS
By Steven Greenhouse and Steven Greenhouse,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 2001
FERNDALE, N.Y. - Inside several large barns rising out of the muddy fields here, migrant workers feed nearly 30,000 ducks three times a day by inserting tubes down their throats. After 30 days of intensive feeding, the farm sends the birds to slaughter, producing a prized gastronomic delight from their swollen, succulent livers: foie gras. In the last decade, the Hudson Valley Foie Gras farm in this Catskills community has had astonishing success. It now produces three-fourths of all American-made foie gras, which means "fatty liver," and visiting chefs from France have given the farm the ultimate compliment, saying its foie gras rivals the French variety.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
Ultimate indulgences. Every era has its favorites. In the '80s, it was champagne and steak tartare. In the '90s, single-malt scotch and Cuban cigars. In the 'Aughties, well, whatever culinary naughties become emblematic of the decade, you probably won't lose by placing your money on foie gras. And place your money you must, because this duck- or goose-liver delicacy that traces its gastronomical history to the ancient Egyptians has always been an expensive treat. This is certainly true in the United States, where in the 19th century, variations of the dish were staples of such great (and some say gluttonous)
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