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Focus Groups

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NEWS
May 7, 2008
The Family Support Committee of the Howard County Base Realignment and Closure Task Force is seeking military families who have moved or are moving to Howard County to join focus groups. The groups will be asked to discuss the needs and concerns of military families, why they chose to move Howard County, support services they use, and services they would like to have. The groups will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Waterloo Elementary School, 5940 Waterloo Road, Elkridge; 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 14 at Pointers Run Elementary School, 6600 Trotter Road, Clarksville; and 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 15 at Forest Ridge Elementary School, 9550 Gorman Road, North Laurel.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The Baltimore school board will launch the first public phase of its search for the next schools CEO —a community input campaign that will allow city residents and school communities to weigh in on issues and the characteristics and qualifications they believe are important for the next superintendent to have. The campaign, announced Tuesday, will begin with an online survey that will be available through Oct. 15. Additionally, the school board will hold a series of forums across the city in early October.
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BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 1997
They were the guinea pigs. They were there to make sure that what had been planned and sketched would be good for the masses and that the project would be a success.Thumbs up on larger family rooms. Thumbs down on protruding garages.Spying from behind a one-way mirror, Jim Joyce, Baltimore division president for Ryland Homes, waited for this final moment.The focus group had checked off everything they wanted in a new home planned for an Ellicott City development. He had a price range in mind, but experience told him that focus groups rarely get it right.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
The lack of diversity on Columbia's governing boards is less an issue than a symptom of the racial divide, a group of about 35 of the town's residents were told Thursday night as they gathered to discuss hidden feelings and bridge cultural gaps. "It's not about any one organizations," said Candace Dodson Reed, co-chair of a group called twentyfivefortyfive that was formed through the Columbia Foundation to encourage community involvement by younger people. "It's about the culture in Howard County.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Before the Rev. Harry Brunett opened his alternative-to-church fellowship in Columbia in 2001, he tested four prototype services in front of various groups. Don't hold services in a church, he was told, use a more neutral location. Speak from the heart, the participants said, and definitely don't cut the silent meditation part. "That's the best way we found to make sure we were touching the spiritual nerve," said Brunett, who plans to use such focus-group techniques over the coming year as he sets up a second fellowship in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Baltimore team officials began preliminary meetings last night with focus groups and NFL Properties about acquiring a name for the city's new football team.Also, Baltimore coach Ted Marchibroda continued his search for a defensive coordinator, and has interest in Pittsburgh Steelers linebackers coach Marvin Lewis and Carolina Panthers secondary coach George Catavolos.Baltimore vice president David Modell said the focus groups will be considering names from The Sun expansion poll in 1993 and the recent name poll from Channel 45, as well as entertaining new ideas.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
Tip of the Week: Performance-based rewards The first step is to determine what performance is to be measured, how it will be measured and over what amount of time the measurement will take place. This must be clearly communicated to all participants so that a level of expected performance is understood. The second step is to determine appropriate rewards for achieving the goals. Typically, the management group decides on rewards. Form focus groups of employees and determine what the participants feel are appropriate rewards.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL | February 12, 1995
Johannesburg, South Africa -- Before South Africa's first democratic election, many whites spoke of black expectations with fear and trembling. Now, it's done with a wink and nudge.But the white perspective remains the same: "They" -- meaning blacks -- think they're going to get everything without working. "They" say President Nelson Mandela has promised them all a Mercedes and a big house, and there's going to be big trouble when these things do not come to pass.Before last April's election, journalists from around the world ventured into the black townships and rural settlements in search of these unrealistic expectations.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | September 15, 1995
Washington. -- Colin Powell is a long way from running for president, but he already has made presidential campaign history. He has turned his race, which is black, into a political advantage.This startling conclusion appears to be supported by early national polling and focus groups. For example, Paul Sniderman, a Stanford University political scientist, says his polling on racial attitudes for the National Science Foundation has found that Mr. Powell's race, in some polls, actually ''magnifies his political strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Celeste and Eric Celeste,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | January 23, 2000
There's no question you want to hate him. How could you not? You hear his story -- man gives up his techie job to live in a house for a year, legally changes his name to DotComGuy, never leaves the property, lives exclusively off the Internet -- and you think, "Hello, nerd." Even when the details are explained -- he'll make almost a hundred grand from corporate sponsors, his every move will be Webcasted by 18 cameras -- you alter your opinion only slightly: "Hello, market-savvy nerd." You decide the only course of action is an article that mercilessly mocks DotComGuy.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
The Family Support Committee of the Howard County Base Realignment and Closure Task Force is seeking military families who have moved or are moving to Howard County to join focus groups. The groups will be asked to discuss the needs and concerns of military families, why they chose to move Howard County, support services they use, and services they would like to have. The groups will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Waterloo Elementary School, 5940 Waterloo Road, Elkridge; 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 14 at Pointers Run Elementary School, 6600 Trotter Road, Clarksville; and 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 15 at Forest Ridge Elementary School, 9550 Gorman Road, North Laurel.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | May 23, 2007
Americans will be choosing change in 2008, if a group of Maryland voters is any indication. Whether the next president will be a Democrat is another question, though. Sen. Barack Obama drew the most positive responses, while Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton came in for rough treatment, during the first in a national series of focus-group discussions sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania's nonpartisan Annenberg Public Policy Center. But when the area voters were asked who would be the safest choice to lead the country in these uncertain times, nearly all, including Democrats and independents, picked Republicans: former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, Sen. John McCain or former Gov. Mitt Romney.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Before the Rev. Harry Brunett opened his alternative-to-church fellowship in Columbia in 2001, he tested four prototype services in front of various groups. Don't hold services in a church, he was told, use a more neutral location. Speak from the heart, the participants said, and definitely don't cut the silent meditation part. "That's the best way we found to make sure we were touching the spiritual nerve," said Brunett, who plans to use such focus-group techniques over the coming year as he sets up a second fellowship in Baltimore.
NEWS
By ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | August 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - After their shellacking in November, Democratic politicians promised to do a better job of telling voters about their moral values. But judging by a candid report last week from party strategists, Democrats have made little progress presenting themselves in a way that would recapture rural voters or make inroads into Republican turf. The report by the Democracy Corps, based on interviews in rural areas and Republican-leaning states, offered a further testament to the cultural divide that has worked to Republicans' advantage in elections.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
Tip of the Week: Performance-based rewards The first step is to determine what performance is to be measured, how it will be measured and over what amount of time the measurement will take place. This must be clearly communicated to all participants so that a level of expected performance is understood. The second step is to determine appropriate rewards for achieving the goals. Typically, the management group decides on rewards. Form focus groups of employees and determine what the participants feel are appropriate rewards.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Sharp questions of ideological bias in the media have been raised for more than three decades, but news organizations appear to be more vulnerable -- and sensitive -- than ever to the charges. In separate incidents over the past week, three major news organizations -- Fox News Channel, MSNBC and The Wall Street Journal -- have come under public fire for the perceived slant of reporters or contributors. The details provoking the three cases are starkly different. On the merits, readers and viewers may look askance at the behavior of any of the three media figures involved in the episodes.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 10, 1991
Anytime you convene a group of people in a room in front of one-way mirror wall through which they are being watched by another group of people, it's possible that something completely unexpected will emerge. Or so reasoned A. M. Chaplin, which is why she asked most of the moderators she spoke to during the research for her focus-group story if they had any Big Surprise stories to tell.Most of their replies had to do with group participants expressing opinions or beliefs that no one had anticipated.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Sharp questions of ideological bias in the media have been raised for more than three decades, but news organizations appear to be more vulnerable -- and sensitive -- than ever to the charges. In separate incidents over the past week, three major news organizations -- Fox News Channel, MSNBC and The Wall Street Journal -- have come under public fire for the perceived slant of reporters or contributors. The details provoking the three cases are starkly different. On the merits, readers and viewers may look askance at the behavior of any of the three media figures involved in the episodes.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Maryann Schriver took a gamble when she voted for George W. Bush four years ago. The 50-year-old suburban Philadelphia homemaker, a lifelong Democrat, was worried that Bush didn't have the "gravitas" to be a good president. But she says that his surprisingly strong leadership, particularly after Sept. 11, has convinced her that she "didn't give him enough credit." Still, she's not sure she'll vote for Bush again in November. At the heart of her concerns: the U.S. occupation of Iraq, which she favored initially but which now seems to her to be "spiraling out of control."
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