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By Joanne E. Morvay | September 12, 2001
Item: Cedarlane Stuffed Focaccia What you get: 2 to 3 servings Cost: About $3.25 Nutritional content: Mediterranean - 410 calories, 14 grams fat, 8 grams saturated fat, 670 milligrams sodium, 51 grams carbohydrate, 5 grams sugars; Roma Tomato & Basil - 275 calories, 9 grams fat, 4 grams saturated fat, 528 milligrams sodium, 33 grams carbohydrate, 5 grams sugars Preparation time: 5 to 6 minutes in microwave, 6 to 7 minutes combined microwave-oven cooking,...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Over the past several years, Baltimore's pizza scene has blossomed, with the opening of new, great pizzerias all across the city. These restaurants tend to have a few things in common: reliance on fresh ingredients, excellent dough and sauces, and friendly atmospheres with a little more polish than the traditional pizza joint. Joe Benny's, which opened in a tiny Little Italy space last spring, has all those things, though it's not a typical pizzeria. It's a focacceria. Or, in layman's terms, a place that uses focaccia bread as pizza dough.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Over the past several years, Baltimore's pizza scene has blossomed, with the opening of new, great pizzerias all across the city. These restaurants tend to have a few things in common: reliance on fresh ingredients, excellent dough and sauces, and friendly atmospheres with a little more polish than the traditional pizza joint. Joe Benny's, which opened in a tiny Little Italy space last spring, has all those things, though it's not a typical pizzeria. It's a focacceria. Or, in layman's terms, a place that uses focaccia bread as pizza dough.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2002
Aida, which sits in an office park on the eastern fringes of Columbia, has a split personality. On the one hand, it is a slightly upscale and very good Italian restaurant with a top-notch wine list. On the other, it is a reasonably priced, and also very good, Italian deli/carryout. Located ominously next to a Weight Watchers outlet, Aida's carryout has an industrial-chic appearance -- bare concrete floor, exposed ducts and wiring, and groovy small, purple lamps hanging down over a few tables.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 7, 2000
Item: Buitoni Focaccia Bread Mix What you get: 12 servings Cost: About $3.50 Preparation time: About 32 to 38 minutes in conventional oven; bread machine times vary Review: A friend first had this focaccia at her mother's house, and both women couldn't wait to tell me about it. They were right. Buitoni's new mix is a real find - the kind of thing you want in your pantry when unexpected guests drop by. The focaccia, fragrant with rosemary and garlic, is fine on its own. But it also makes a great pallet for more complicated appetizers or a pizza.
FEATURES
By Nick Malgieri and Nick Malgieri,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 24, 1993
Focaccia and pizza are my favorite things made from bread dough and they are as good as they are easy to prepare. Focaccia, the Italian flat bread, can be made in round or rectangular shapes, and its dough is nothing more than flour, water, yeast, salt and a little oil, which is added for flavor and ease of handling. Usually no more than an inch thick, most focacce (the plural) are served as an accompaniment to a meal, or, especially in the rectangular shape, split for sandwiches.Typically, a focaccia is baked with a topping, often nothing more than a drizzling of olive oil and a sprinkling of coarse salt.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 29, 1995
First we discovered pasta (as opposed to spaghetti), then moved on to tiramisu, osso buco and polenta. Americans have gone bonkers for Italian food.Now we've found the world's best way to sop up the sauce -- focaccia.The Genoan flat bread is chewy and aromatic, about as far removed from sandwich bread as sauce Bolognese is from Ragu. Restaurants -- even non-Italian -- have been offering it in bread baskets and using it for high-class sandwiches. It also turns up as an appetizer with toppings of herbs, black olives, tomatoes and cheese.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Focaccia bread? Chocolate sundae cookies? Try them and be glad you did.Lois J. Lambie of Fayetteville, N.C., wrote that when she visited British Columbia, an herb bread called focaccia was served frequently with soup, salad or pasta, and it was delicious. She has not been able to find this recipe.Sharon Weinberg of Owings Mills responded with a "no fuss focaccia with sun-dried tomatoes." Also, Kate Henshall of Baltimore sent in a focaccia recipe, very quick and easy, which may also appeal to those who prefer not to use sun-dried tomatoes.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / Express Rely on store-bought spiral sliced ham, potato salad and baked beans for a fine meal today. Add pumpernickel bread. Finish the quick meal with a store-bought chocolate layer cake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | March 12, 1998
Gourmet brick-oven pizza may be the headliner at Ricciuti's, but this Columbia restaurant also features a strong supporting cast: focaccia sandwiches, fresh salads and Italian staples from PTC Stromboli to eggplant Parmesan.Owners James and Amy Ricciuti opened their bright Italian bistro about 18 months ago in the Hickory Ridge Village Center, dressed the place in a green and white scheme and hired a friendly, young staff to wait on tables.Their brick pizza oven glows fiery hot at eye level behind the front counter.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2002
On the wall behind the counter at Bella's Market reads the small carry-out's official slogan: Vivere Amore E Mangiare -- Live, Love and Eat. What's not to like about a place with such a slogan? And I did, indeed, like Bella's very much. Bella's is a fine Italian deli that sits, oddly enough, amid the cornfields and nurseries of Glen Arm. It occupies a small old railroad station, now clad in cedar shingles painted pale yellow. The young couple who opened the deli in April obviously pour their hearts into the food and service.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2002
Trattoria Annamaria, a charming Federal Hill deli and grocery, doesn't attempt too much - thick Italian sandwiches, a handful of pasta dishes, soup and a special or two. But what it does, it does well. The small restaurant includes a few tables and a counter section that looks out on busy Light Street. Murals featuring David and Venus grace the walls, and that familiar smell of Italian cheese and cold cuts lets you know what awaits you. The special the day I ventured in was, fortunately, a chicken parmigiana sandwich on a fresh sub roll ($5.95)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 23, 2001
The cow print banquettes are in place, the bowl of pomegranate seeds is ready. Dozens of artisanal cheeses are arranged beguilingly in the refrigerated case in back near the "cave" where cheeses are being aged. The walls, a golden yellow the color of certain Cheddars, are decorated with cave-painting animals -- ones that produce milk for cheese. Combalou, the sprightly cafe and fromagerie, is open for business. The theme is cheese, in case you missed it. Combalou, named after the French caves where Roquefort was supposed to have been discovered, celebrates the stuff in almost every way possible, from tossing it with pears and field greens to layering it with pate and aioli on focaccia.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / Express Rely on store-bought spiral sliced ham, potato salad and baked beans for a fine meal today. Add pumpernickel bread. Finish the quick meal with a store-bought chocolate layer cake.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | September 12, 2001
Item: Cedarlane Stuffed Focaccia What you get: 2 to 3 servings Cost: About $3.25 Nutritional content: Mediterranean - 410 calories, 14 grams fat, 8 grams saturated fat, 670 milligrams sodium, 51 grams carbohydrate, 5 grams sugars; Roma Tomato & Basil - 275 calories, 9 grams fat, 4 grams saturated fat, 528 milligrams sodium, 33 grams carbohydrate, 5 grams sugars Preparation time: 5 to 6 minutes in microwave, 6 to 7 minutes combined microwave-oven cooking,...
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 7, 2000
Item: Buitoni Focaccia Bread Mix What you get: 12 servings Cost: About $3.50 Preparation time: About 32 to 38 minutes in conventional oven; bread machine times vary Review: A friend first had this focaccia at her mother's house, and both women couldn't wait to tell me about it. They were right. Buitoni's new mix is a real find - the kind of thing you want in your pantry when unexpected guests drop by. The focaccia, fragrant with rosemary and garlic, is fine on its own. But it also makes a great pallet for more complicated appetizers or a pizza.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1998
If you work downtown, you may want to stroll over to Sascha's Daily for lunch or an early dinner. You're likely to have an interesting, inexpensive meal there.The catch is that the cafe closes at 6 p.m. and the menu is limited. Step up to the counter to take a look at what Sascha's does serve: Saschette sandwiches wrapped in cellophane and tied with ribbon; crispy topped focaccia sandwiches held together in sheaths of foil; tubs of freshly made salads, like the Tuscan tuna with artichokes and sun-dried tomatoes.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2002
Aida, which sits in an office park on the eastern fringes of Columbia, has a split personality. On the one hand, it is a slightly upscale and very good Italian restaurant with a top-notch wine list. On the other, it is a reasonably priced, and also very good, Italian deli/carryout. Located ominously next to a Weight Watchers outlet, Aida's carryout has an industrial-chic appearance -- bare concrete floor, exposed ducts and wiring, and groovy small, purple lamps hanging down over a few tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to The Sun | January 28, 1999
All restaurants have ups and downs, but my two trips to Donna's in the Can Company were like night and day. I was surprised by how much went wrong during our meal on a recent evening at the restaurant, which opened in November. Dishes didn't work or didn't taste like what the menu had described. The decor, always a strong suit at Donna Crivello and Alan Hirsch's coffee bars, felt cold and uninviting inside the rehabbed warehouse that also houses a Bibelot bookstore. But when I returned a few days later for lunch, I had a completely different impression.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1998
If you work downtown, you may want to stroll over to Sascha's Daily for lunch or an early dinner. You're likely to have an interesting, inexpensive meal there.The catch is that the cafe closes at 6 p.m. and the menu is limited. Step up to the counter to take a look at what Sascha's does serve: Saschette sandwiches wrapped in cellophane and tied with ribbon; crispy topped focaccia sandwiches held together in sheaths of foil; tubs of freshly made salads, like the Tuscan tuna with artichokes and sun-dried tomatoes.
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