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NEWS
November 5, 2013
I fail to understand the logic of Baltimore's Commission on Sustainability in recommending against banning polystyrene containers, and the City Council should ignore those recommendations and move forward with the ban. ( "Council has misgivings on banning foam containers," Nov. 1). It is important to recognize that the continued use of those containers exacts a cost from the public at large whether it is in cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay or in providing additional collections. In effect, the public is asked to pay for the true cost of the use of those containers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Polyurethane foam, long used in products such as bedding, furniture and insulation to make people more comfortable, someday also may save lives. Eight Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students have devised a tool that may stop profuse bleeding by injecting the foam into those wounded on the battlefield. As a class project, the students chose to tackle the problem of hemorrhaging, the top cause of death for service members in war. Existing devices - tourniquets and medicated bandages - can be unusable or ineffective in wounds to the neck or where limbs meet the torso.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Fed up with foam cups floating in Baltimore's waterways, a City Council committee voted Tuesday to approve a ban on polystyrene foam products for carryout food and drink items within the city limits. The measure, sponsored by Councilman James B. Kraft, would impose penalties on food service businesses for using products such as Styrofoam. It will now go to the full council Monday for a vote. "No food service facility may use any disposable food service ware made from polystyrene for the purpose of allowing consumers to take away prepared foods or beverages from its premises," Kraft's bill states.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | November 21, 2013
When your annual Christmas display already contains more than 50,000 lights and hundreds of moving, lighted reindeer, polar bears, a couple of Santas, angels and snowmen, what do you add to make the whole glitzy package even more appealing? You add model trains, and lots of 'em. Chuck Greason spent the past several months buying five sets of trains, laying more than 600 feet of track in front of his Parkton house and working with a train enthusiast in California to program a computer that controls the trains' routes, whistles and horns.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
The Baltimore City Council postponed action Monday on a bill that would have banned the use of foam cups and containers for carryout food and drinks after several members withdrew their support. Councilman James B. Kraft, the bill's chief sponsor, said he is still hopeful Baltimore can become the first major East Coast city to adopt such a ban. Kraft, who represents Canton, Little Italy and Fells Point, said some council members expressed concern that the city needs to work toward a cultural shift that changes individual behaviors on littering, rather than a government edict.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver and Jarrett Graver,Contributing Writer | April 2, 1998
The back of a van isn't the ideal performance venue for many aspiring musicians. Just don't tell that to the four young chaps who make up the local band Foam, purveyors of alterna-metal guitar crunch from Hagerstown. After a show one night, frontman Jason Teach and lead guitarist Scott Fisher courted Epic Records general manager David Massey with some new material in the back of the group's van. He was so taken with their impromptu, unplugged performance that he made them an offer right then and there.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 16, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Plastic foam might seem an unlikely material for building the exterior walls of houses, but for a number of years it has been used that way, with varying success.John S. Giuliani, of the Philadelphia suburb of Trappe, thinks a Canadian foam system called Nascor has special promise. He has become the first U.S. dealer.Mr. Giuliani, in turn, has gained a firm believer in carpenter/contractor Tom McDonough, who is using Nascor in a Bensalem, Pa., house he is building for himself and his family.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
The wind shifts, clearing a view through the smoke of burning tree stumps to reveal a tall, gray-bearded man of 300 pounds dressed in a black jacket, jeans secured by a saucer-sized belt buckle and a cap emblazoned with a Kodiak bear.Rich McCann, 39, known to friends as "The Bear," is from Team Kodiak, Foam Fire Control Inc., of Springfield, Mo., a company that specializes in putting out unusual fires with a foam spray that he compares with dishwashing liquid.McCann drove from Missouri to southwestern Baltimore County in his foam-mixing truck to begin work yesterday on the tree stump fire that has raged underground and spewed smoke for almost two weeks at Patapsco Valley Farms in Granite.
NEWS
By Deborah I. Greene and Deborah I. Greene,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1991
Clouds of smoky steam billowed yesterday from the stump fire in western Baltimore County as firefighters sprayed a foam solution expected to eventually put out the blaze, which has spread to the entire 7-acre dump.A Missouri expert hired to put out the fire at the Patapsco Valley Tree Farm in the 8700 block of Dogwood Road said extinguishing the blaze would take longer than the 10 days he had originally estimated.However, he remained confident that the foam would work faster than tearing apart the smoldering rubble and dousing it with water, as firefighters have been doing for nearly two weeks with little success.
NEWS
By Emily Dwass and Emily Dwass,Los Angeles Times | September 12, 2007
Getting out of bed isn't always easy. For some, it helps to visualize a mug of coffee topped with clouds of hot foam. In the past, the only way to get that kind of froth was by driving to your favorite barista or by investing in an espresso machine with a gizmo for steaming milk. But stand-alone milk frothers have been gaining in popularity. I tested several. I considered the quality and volume of foam they produced, speed, design, ease of use and ease of assembly and cleaning. I used nonfat milk in all the tests.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
I fail to understand the logic of Baltimore's Commission on Sustainability in recommending against banning polystyrene containers, and the City Council should ignore those recommendations and move forward with the ban. ( "Council has misgivings on banning foam containers," Nov. 1). It is important to recognize that the continued use of those containers exacts a cost from the public at large whether it is in cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay or in providing additional collections. In effect, the public is asked to pay for the true cost of the use of those containers.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
I wonder how many people are aware that Baltimore has a polystyrene recycling center at 28th and Sisson streets. I live in Baltimore County and drive in to recycle my Styrofoam or other polystyrene products. I would be nice if polystyrene had never been invented, but I'm afraid it's here to stay. And stay it will - nearly for infinity ("Container ban put off," June 18)! Baltimore at one time had a great anti-littering campaign, "Shoot one in the Basket. " That would be a wastebasket.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
The Baltimore City Council postponed action Monday on a bill that would have banned the use of foam cups and containers for carryout food and drinks after several members withdrew their support. Councilman James B. Kraft, the bill's chief sponsor, said he is still hopeful Baltimore can become the first major East Coast city to adopt such a ban. Kraft, who represents Canton, Little Italy and Fells Point, said some council members expressed concern that the city needs to work toward a cultural shift that changes individual behaviors on littering, rather than a government edict.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Fed up with foam cups floating in Baltimore's waterways, a City Council committee voted Tuesday to approve a ban on polystyrene foam products for carryout food and drink items within the city limits. The measure, sponsored by Councilman James B. Kraft, would impose penalties on food service businesses for using products such as Styrofoam. It will now go to the full council Monday for a vote. "No food service facility may use any disposable food service ware made from polystyrene for the purpose of allowing consumers to take away prepared foods or beverages from its premises," Kraft's bill states.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
This is one of those products Gear Girl wishes she did not have to test. But although she is very careful outdoors, she sometimes misses the warning signs ("Leaves of three ... "). The lack of vigilance leads to little red bumps, a rash and the insatiable desire to scratch 24/7 - the calling card of poison ivy. The American Academy of Dermatology estimates that 85 percent of us will develop an allergic reaction if we touch poison ivy, oak or sumac, so finding relief ranks high on the adventure must-have list.
NEWS
By rob kasper and rob kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | September 10, 2008
Beer and body parts were the topics of some lively exchanges recently on my blog, Kasper On Tap. We started off with a discussion of a deodorant from Tom's of Maine that used hops to help kill odor and make guys smell good. Most commenters were "agin" the hoppy deodorant, either because they were allergic to it or because it clashed with their philosophic view that hops should appear only in beer. We then moved onto a look at beer-friendly apparel. I compared the Beerbelly, a new vestlike vessel that you can fill up with beer and wear under your shirt, to beer helmets, hard hats that hold two cans of beer.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
Firefighters decided yesterday to let the mountain of stumps near Granite burn freely for now -- acknowledging that the foam brought in by a Missouri fire expert wasn't doing any good and that it may be a year before the fire is out.Battalion Chief Tom Bowling of the Baltimore County Fire Department said the foam sprayed for the past week on burning debris at the Patapsco Valley Tree Farm was shut off shortly after 4 p.m. yesterday because it wasn't working.The...
NEWS
By Ralph Vartabedian and Ralph Vartabedian,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 27, 2003
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A new photographic analysis of Columbia's launch shows that foam debris falling off the external tank slammed into the orbiter's vulnerable leading edge, rather than the underside of the wing as NASA earlier had believed, investigators said yesterday. Although such an impact was under examination, the analysis is the strongest evidence to date that the shuttle burned up on re-entry because of a breach in some part of its leading edge that allowed super-heated gas into the wing.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2007
The shuttle Discovery rocketed into space yesterday, carrying a crew of seven on a challenging two-week mission to continue construction of the International Space Station. The flight includes five spacewalks, the largest number of any shuttle mission. Discovery blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 11:38 a.m. on an eight-minute jump to space that carried the shuttle from a standing start to a speed of more than 17,000 mph. Discovery's engines guzzled fuel equivalent to emptying a backyard swimming pool every 23 seconds.
NEWS
By Emily Dwass and Emily Dwass,Los Angeles Times | September 12, 2007
Getting out of bed isn't always easy. For some, it helps to visualize a mug of coffee topped with clouds of hot foam. In the past, the only way to get that kind of froth was by driving to your favorite barista or by investing in an espresso machine with a gizmo for steaming milk. But stand-alone milk frothers have been gaining in popularity. I tested several. I considered the quality and volume of foam they produced, speed, design, ease of use and ease of assembly and cleaning. I used nonfat milk in all the tests.
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