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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 7, 2007
Xtra Heat's first foal, Southwestern Heat, will make his Maryland debut as a 2-1 morning-line favorite in a $30,000 maiden race at Laurel Park on Wednesday. Xtra Heat, formerly a dominant female sprinter based at Laurel, won the 2001 Eclipse Award for top 3-year-old filly. Southwestern Heat, a son of Gone West, was transferred to the barn of Tim Salzman two months ago after starting five times in Kentucky under trainer Dale Romans, recording three third-place finishes.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Gina Riley staked out a spot near the finish line long before the crowds arrived at the Timonium Fairground race track Sunday. She put a blanket on the ground, parked a cooler nearby and sat in the shade of the grandstand. She thought of her son, Bryce, who would have turned 34 Friday. Riley and her husband, Todd Tracey, make this trip every year in honor of Bryce, who had spent his life fighting dermatomyositis, a rare muscle and tissue disease that prevented him from going on rides at the Maryland Fair.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
NORTH EAST -- Dolly Pouska has raised hundreds of foals at her farm in Cecil County, but only one of them has ever won a race at a Maryland track.The horse that beat the odds is named Welsh Minstrel.He is one of Dolly's "bucket babies."When the 2-year-old gelding runs in the eighth race at Laurel tomorrow, he will be trying for his fourth win in two months, making him one of the winningest 2-year-olds on the grounds.Although the sheer number of foals that are dropped each year at Pouska's farm rank her as one of the state's most prolific horse breeders, these animals are bred for an unusual purpose.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
College junior Steve Moirano has no children of his own, but he played the proud parent Saturday as a pair of foals debuted to a crowd of onlookers at the University of Maryland campus farm. "What was it like?" Brandon Hurn, a sophomore chemical engineering student, asked Moirano, referring to a mare known as Amazin'. "Were you there?" "I actually pulled the foals out," answered Moirano, an animal sciences major planning to go into veterinary medicine. He and a few classmates were on hand to show off the foals - the first born on the farm in 30 years - and answer questions at Maryland Day, the university's annual campuswide showcase.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Mary Bo Peep, a homely old broodmare with a knack for delivering winners to the track, has produced her latest hope -- a leggy filly born Wednesday at Liberty Run Farm in Carroll County.The little bay arrived in a dimly lighted stall on a bed of straw in the dead of night -- prime foaling time. Nine days overdue, the filly hit the ground hungry. Born at 2: 30 a.m., she took her first shaky steps within an hour and then began nursing. Handlers marveled at the 80-pound newborn's appetite and nicknamed her "Miss Piggy."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
Sometime around Valentine's Day every year the breeding season begins. It's hectic enough getting the mares to the stallions and hoping for coital bliss. Who ever thinks that the resulting birth will be a race against the New Year's clock? This story comes courtesy of Mike Figgins, farm manager at Glade Valley Farms in Frederick. On Feb. 15, 2000, one of the farm's mares, Travelling (owned by Sondra and Howard Bender) was bred to With Approval at Brookdale Farm in Kentucky. The projected foaling date, 11 months, 5 days later, was Jan. 20, 2001.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
The foal snorted, kicked at her stall and turned in dizzying circles in a desperate search for her dearest ally. Mother was missing, and the frightened young filly wanted her back.She pawed the sawdust floor, snorted again and reared back on her long hind legs, "Hi-yo Silver" style. Then she whinnied -- a long, shrill scream that pierced the thick, muggy air, a scream that would have brought an old broodmare running, had she not been two fences and several pastures away.September is weaning time at breeding farms across the country, a traumatic period for mares and foals -- the equine equivalent of the first day of school, except that these youngsters never come home to mama.
FEATURES
By JOSH PONS | May 3, 1992
In January of 1989, photographer David Harp and horseman Josh Pons began a chronicle of the life of Reprimand, a Thoroughbred filly. Mr. Harp's photos coincided with the beginning of Mr. Pons' daily diary of life at Maryland's oldest breeding farm, Country Life Farm in Bel Air.Excerpted below is the story not only of a young horse, but also of a family which has been raising horses on its Harford County land since 1933. Mr. Pons' diary is scheduled to be made into a book, and the entries below are reprinted with permission of the publisher.
NEWS
June 1, 2001
THE CULPRIT in the mysterious deaths of foals on Kentucky thoroughbred farms this spring has apparently been found: tent caterpillars eating cherry tree leaves, which contain naturally occurring cyanide. Mares ingested the abnormally abundant insect larvae (or feces) from grass or water tanks, poisoning their babies in the womb. Now comes the tricky problem: how to deal with this naturally occurring threat in the future. Spray the trees with chemicals to kill caterpillars? Cut down the trees, which are common as weeds in the bluegrass pastures of Kentucky's $1 billion horse industry?
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Miss Piggy is grazing for two. The horse, who raced as Mary Bo Quoit but is better known by her nickname, is three months pregnant. She's awaiting the pitter-patter of little hooves, which, her owners hope, will one day run faster than most. Her racing days done, Miss Piggy wiles away the summer heat in a barn cooled by electric fans; nights, she frisks under the stars in a verdant pasture with several other mothers-to-be. It's a mare-ternity ward for thoroughbreds - quite a change for the 6-year-old, whose life has been chronicled in The Sun. "She's `working' these days.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 16, 2012
Spring brings all kinds of new life. The Assateague Island Allia nce reports two foals born recently to the wild horse herd that roams the National Seashore near Ocean City. The little filly pictured here was born last Friday to an 8-year-old mare dubbed April Star (aka N2BHS-C, under the alpha-numeric identification system used by the National Park Service to track the genetic lineage of the herd). The alliance, which holds an an annual horse naming auction to help support management of the animals, initially reported that this was the only new addition expected this year to the 114-horse herd because of the contraceptives administered to keep the wild animals from overpopulating the narrow, sandy barrier island.  But late yesterday, the alliance emailed that a second foal had been spotted by a park staffer, this one born to a mare named Queen Latifah (aka N9BFT)
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
A male foal Zebra sticks close to his mother at the National Zoo of San Salvador. This baby is less than a week old and the first to be born in the National Zoo.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2007
After the birth of a foal at her horse farm in Fallston, Ellen Pons waited, poised for the right moment to capture the newborn and his mother. The foal nuzzled on the mare, trying to figure out how to get milk. The mare lowered her nose and touched it to the foal's nose, and Pons snapped a photograph. "Taking photographs of an animal is like trying to catch a dancer who is moving in the perfect position," Pons said. "Knowing the horse's body language helps me to expect the unexpected."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 7, 2007
Xtra Heat's first foal, Southwestern Heat, will make his Maryland debut as a 2-1 morning-line favorite in a $30,000 maiden race at Laurel Park on Wednesday. Xtra Heat, formerly a dominant female sprinter based at Laurel, won the 2001 Eclipse Award for top 3-year-old filly. Southwestern Heat, a son of Gone West, was transferred to the barn of Tim Salzman two months ago after starting five times in Kentucky under trainer Dale Romans, recording three third-place finishes.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The foal was a big one, and it was a rough birth. Wantyoutowantme, the 6-year-old mare, suffered for three days until she had to be euthanized. An autopsy revealed that the foal had punctured his mother's kidney with one of his hoofs. That foal is now a 2-year-old gelding named What's Up Lonely. And yesterday, he charged from sixth as the even-money favorite to win the six-furlong, $100,000 Maryland Million Nursery at Pimlico Race Course by 1 1/4 lengths. Costas Triantafilos, one of the gelding's owners and owner of the Costas Inn restaurant on North Point Boulevard, pulled Cynthia McGinnes into the winner's circle to tell the story.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
The mating held great promise. The mare, a daughter of Spectacular Bid, had set a track record at Keeneland as a racehorse, and her first foal had been a top stakes winner. The sire, a regally bred, multiple Grade I-stakes winner, commanded a flashy $75,000 stud fee. The distinguished mare and blue-chip stallion mated in 2000. The foal would have been born approximately 11 months later in 2001, and it would have been a member of this year's 3-year-old class competing in the Triple Crown races.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
She has been poked and prodded, weaned and wormed, inoculated and inspected -- from head to hoof.Miss Piggy has been through the wringer. It's the bane of a would-be racehorse.In recent weeks, the 6-month-old Carroll County foal has run a gauntlet of tests designed to fingerprint young thoroughbreds. Blood samples and mug shots of Miss Piggy have been filed with The Jockey Club, the Kentucky organization that registers racing hopefuls.Miss Piggy's dossier includes photographs and records of the filly's special markings: the cowlicks, or swirls, in her coat; her lone white hoof; and the hairless raised callouses, or "night eyes," on her long, slender legs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
The mating held great promise. The mare, a daughter of Spectacular Bid, had set a track record at Keeneland as a racehorse, and her first foal had been a top stakes winner. The sire, a regally bred, multiple Grade I-stakes winner, commanded a flashy $75,000 stud fee. The distinguished mare and blue-chip stallion mated in 2000. The foal would have been born approximately 11 months later in 2001, and it would have been a member of this year's 3-year-old class competing in the Triple Crown races.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
BENSALEM, Pa. - A mystery requires foreshadowing. In the case of Speak Compelling, that came when she finished last by 38 lengths in a race Jan. 19, 2000, at Philadelphia Park. Then a 3-year-old filly, the Maryland-bred Speak Compelling had absolutely no interest in racing one mile around an oval in the dead of winter against trimmer, more focused fillies. A mystery features a dramatic highlight. That occurred 11 days later, when Speak Compelling gave birth to a healthy, 55-pound filly in her stall at the racetrack.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
Italian scientists announced yesterday that they have created the first cloned horse, raising the possibility that breeders might someday churn out genetic duplicates of champion equines, while heartbroken owners will be able to bring beloved old mounts back to life. The cloned foal - dubbed Prometea - was born May 28 at the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona. A Haflinger with a splash of white down its nose, the horse already weighs more than 220 pounds. "She's great and growing up fast," said Cesare Galli, the laboratory director and head of the cloning team.
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