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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 1998
In 1851, when Richard Wagner was already at work on what would become his masterpiece, "Der Ring des Nibelungen" -- the almost insanely ambitious operatic tetralogy that attempted to narrate the history of the world from creation to apocalypse -- he looked back upon his "Der fliegende Hollander" ("The Flying Dutchman") of 10 years before."Thus began my career as a poet and my farewell to the mere manufacture of opera texts," he wrote in "A Communication to My Friends," one of those publications that frequently demonstrated the composer's belief that the world was as interested in Richard Wagner as Wagner was in himself.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
In lieu of my Wednesday Midweek Madness post, I figured I would wait a day so I could take note of Halloween. And what better way than with a little bite from Heinrich Marschner's "Der Vampyr"? This 1828 opera, which had some popularity back in the day, has a pretty cool story about Lord Ruthven, a vampire causing havoc in England -- decades before Bram Stoker imagined a visit by Count Dracula. I saw the opera ages ago, and I vaguely recall that it contained some cool things.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 17, 2008
The broody sea captain who propels Wagner's first operatic hit, The Flying Dutchman, is trapped in an endless rerun of a demonic version of The Bachelor, where potential brides invariably lack the fidelity that can release him from his spectral fate. Trying to find true love on his once-every-seven-years' shore leave, he doesn't ask much - just a woman willing to go the extra little mile and sacrifice her life for him. Whatever faulty lessons in human relations or spiritual fulfillment may lie behind the curious myth of The Flying Dutchman, the reality of the opera is that it can provide an awfully potent musical and theatrical voyage, given enough ballast.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2008
Longtime Annapolis sailor Jason Stearns sailed into his debut role as that most famous sailor - Richard Wagner's The Flying Dutchman - at the prestigious summer opera festival in Savonlinna, Finland, last month. Back home, the veteran opera singer recounted the rigors of performing in the Olavinlinna Castle, a 15th-century fortress. "You can imagine my surprise when I was shown how I was to make my first entrance to the stage. I had to climb up a very high ladder in the back of the castle - maybe 15 feet high - and then crawl through one of those cannon holes, usually in pouring rain, barely big enough to fit through.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Johnny Walker, who made Baltimore laugh and lawyers wince for more than a decade as a madcap disc jockey and then shucked the fame and walked away when his AM radio station switched to an all-talk format, died Monday evening at University Specialty Hospital in Baltimore. He was 56 and suffered in recent years from a pulmonary disease, said his former wife, April Montgomery, who had looked after his affairs. The trumpet-blowing Mr. Walker's stunts included citywide treasure hunts, flying to Kenya in search of a witch doctor to help the Orioles, reading his tax-evasion indictment on the air, and his Charles Center marriage to Mrs. Montgomery -- who said she met him while participating in a contest.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 10, 1995
Richard Wagner, "Der fliegende Hollaender" ("The Flying Dutchman"), performed by baritone Hans Hotter (the Dutchman), soprano Viorica Ursuleac (Senta), bass Georg Hann (Daland), tenor Karl Ostertag (Erik) and tenor Franz Klarwein (the Steersman), and Clemens Krauss conducting the Bavarian State Opera Orchestra and Chorus (Preiser Records Mono 90250).When it came to self-appraisal, Richard Wagner was no shrinking violet. But when he said of himself that "so far as I know, I can find in the life of no artist so striking a transformation, in so short a time, as is evident between 'Rienzi' and 'The Flying Dutchman,' " he was on the money.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 2006
In the "If you've got it, flaunt it" department, Disney Cruise Line capitalizes on its exclusive movie franchise. Star-struck Mouseketeers of all ages can now get a live look-see at the Flying Dutchman, the ship made famous in Disney's latest flick Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, on the line's private Caribbean island, Castaway Cay. The film prop, with its barnacle-encrusted bow, flaunts ragged sails and imparts a bona fide look of haunting the...
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 14, 1998
Norman Richardson scored 12 of his team-high 15 points in the second half as Hofstra rallied from a nine-point halftime deficit to defeat Towson University, 64-60, in an America East game in Hempstead, N.Y.The Tigers (2-10, 0-5) have lost nine straight games.Towson led 43-32 early in the second half before the Flying Dutchman took control with a 19-2 run for a 48-45 lead after a Richardson three-pointer with 9: 33 left.Towson got as close as 53-51 on a Ralph Biggs jumper with 5: 43 remaining.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 11, 1995
Wagner's fans are almost as inebriated with a sense of his music's greatness as the sociopathic composer himself was. That is the reason -- the performance surely did not merit it -- for the stupendous applause following the Washington Concert Opera's "The Flying Dutchman" in Washington Friday evening at Lisner Auditorium.The two chief reasons for attending the performance were the chance to hear baritone James Morris in the title role and Deborah Voight as Senta. Unfortunately, Voight -- the current white hope in the, so far, long and fruitless search for a dramatic soprano who can succeed Birgit Nilsson -- canceled and was replaced by the Canadian, Frances Ginzer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
In lieu of my Wednesday Midweek Madness post, I figured I would wait a day so I could take note of Halloween. And what better way than with a little bite from Heinrich Marschner's "Der Vampyr"? This 1828 opera, which had some popularity back in the day, has a pretty cool story about Lord Ruthven, a vampire causing havoc in England -- decades before Bram Stoker imagined a visit by Count Dracula. I saw the opera ages ago, and I vaguely recall that it contained some cool things.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 17, 2008
The broody sea captain who propels Wagner's first operatic hit, The Flying Dutchman, is trapped in an endless rerun of a demonic version of The Bachelor, where potential brides invariably lack the fidelity that can release him from his spectral fate. Trying to find true love on his once-every-seven-years' shore leave, he doesn't ask much - just a woman willing to go the extra little mile and sacrifice her life for him. Whatever faulty lessons in human relations or spiritual fulfillment may lie behind the curious myth of The Flying Dutchman, the reality of the opera is that it can provide an awfully potent musical and theatrical voyage, given enough ballast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 14, 2007
Harry R. Shriver Jr., the legendary Baltimore radio executive who brought such personalities as Johnny Walker, Peter Berry -- "The Flying Dutchman" -- Charlie Eckman, Ron Matz and Tom Marr to WFBR-AM, and created "Conference Call," an innovative lunchtime radio current events discussion program, died Satuday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 74. "He had his pulse on the radio business in Baltimore during the 1970s and 1980s, and took chances in an era when broadcasters weren't taking chances.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 2006
In the "If you've got it, flaunt it" department, Disney Cruise Line capitalizes on its exclusive movie franchise. Star-struck Mouseketeers of all ages can now get a live look-see at the Flying Dutchman, the ship made famous in Disney's latest flick Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, on the line's private Caribbean island, Castaway Cay. The film prop, with its barnacle-encrusted bow, flaunts ragged sails and imparts a bona fide look of haunting the...
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | August 21, 2004
SURE, MICHAEL Phelps appears to have everything a 19-year-old guy could want: fame, fortune and a chestful of Olympic gold medals that's the ultimate babe magnet, way better than hot wheels or walking your poodle past the bars at Happy Hour. But there's still something missing in the kid's life. And that something is this: a cool nickname. Let's face it, when you get to be as big as Phelps is - five gold medals and two bronze in Athens as my fat little fingers type this - you need a nickname.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Johnny Walker, who made Baltimore laugh and lawyers wince for more than a decade as a madcap disc jockey and then shucked the fame and walked away when his AM radio station switched to an all-talk format, died Monday evening at University Specialty Hospital in Baltimore. He was 56 and suffered in recent years from a pulmonary disease, said his former wife, April Montgomery, who had looked after his affairs. The trumpet-blowing Mr. Walker's stunts included citywide treasure hunts, flying to Kenya in search of a witch doctor to help the Orioles, reading his tax-evasion indictment on the air, and his Charles Center marriage to Mrs. Montgomery -- who said she met him while participating in a contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 29, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO -- Puritanical types, who have always taken a dim view of the City by the Bay, would find it fitting that sin and damnation have been a major focus for audiences there this month. They would certainly have sympathized with the elderly gentleman who, during San Francisco Opera's production of La damnation de Faust by Berlioz, couldn't handle a sadomasochistic, heavy-on-the-leath-er orgy scene. He jumped up from his seat and headed for the exit, all the while proclaiming, "This is trash!
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | August 21, 2004
SURE, MICHAEL Phelps appears to have everything a 19-year-old guy could want: fame, fortune and a chestful of Olympic gold medals that's the ultimate babe magnet, way better than hot wheels or walking your poodle past the bars at Happy Hour. But there's still something missing in the kid's life. And that something is this: a cool nickname. Let's face it, when you get to be as big as Phelps is - five gold medals and two bronze in Athens as my fat little fingers type this - you need a nickname.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 30, 1998
This week at the MeyerhoffListen to master fiddler Mark O'Connor (pictured) when he performs his blend of jazz, bluegrass, Celtic and classical sounds at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. And today, help kick off the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's three-week festival celebrating "100 Years of George Gershwin" when the Morgan State University Choir, soprano Janice Chandler and other soloists join the orchestra in concerts...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 30, 1998
This week at the MeyerhoffListen to master fiddler Mark O'Connor (pictured) when he performs his blend of jazz, bluegrass, Celtic and classical sounds at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. And today, help kick off the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's three-week festival celebrating "100 Years of George Gershwin" when the Morgan State University Choir, soprano Janice Chandler and other soloists join the orchestra in concerts...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 1998
In 1851, when Richard Wagner was already at work on what would become his masterpiece, "Der Ring des Nibelungen" -- the almost insanely ambitious operatic tetralogy that attempted to narrate the history of the world from creation to apocalypse -- he looked back upon his "Der fliegende Hollander" ("The Flying Dutchman") of 10 years before."Thus began my career as a poet and my farewell to the mere manufacture of opera texts," he wrote in "A Communication to My Friends," one of those publications that frequently demonstrated the composer's belief that the world was as interested in Richard Wagner as Wagner was in himself.
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