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By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals yesterday issued Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. a grading permit to begin disposing of fly ash at Brandonwood Business Park on Solley Road in Glen Burnie.BGE has used fly ash, a waste product from its coal-fired generators at the Brandon Shores and Wagner Point power plants, as structural fill material on two parcels of land across from the power plant since 1982.The Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash appealed in mid-April the grading permit that would allow BGE to use a third parcel for fly ash disposal, saying the company had failed to meet a grading requirement to have on hand an overall site plan.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It's the sort of project that might soften objections to suburban development: a Wegmans supermarket that peddles everything from $6 takeout meals to black truffles that can retail for $400 per pound. But the planned Wegmans in Anne Arundel County, part of a $300 million project called The Village at Waugh Chapel South, has sparked protests from some nearby residents. They fear that fly ash soil contamination at the site — a former dump — could pollute their drinking water. A flurry of legal activity questions the impact of construction on underground pollution from fly ash, a toxic byproduct of coal that has seeped into area groundwater in places.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It's the sort of project that might soften objections to suburban development: a Wegmans supermarket that peddles everything from $6 takeout meals to black truffles that can retail for $400 per pound. But the planned Wegmans in Anne Arundel County, part of a $300 million project called The Village at Waugh Chapel South, has sparked protests from some nearby residents. They fear that fly ash soil contamination at the site — a former dump — could pollute their drinking water. A flurry of legal activity questions the impact of construction on underground pollution from fly ash, a toxic byproduct of coal that has seeped into area groundwater in places.
NEWS
January 16, 2010
The Maryland Department of the Environment says it plans to sue Mirant Mid-Atlantic and Mirant Maryland Ash Management over disposal of fly ash at its Brandywine site. MDE Secretary Shari Wilson said in a statement Friday that Mirant discharges pollutants from leachate into groundwater without a permit. New state regulations took effect in December 2008, but MDE says it has not been able to reach agreement with Mirant on compliance schedules. The department says it will file notice under the Clean Water Act alleging water pollution violations.
NEWS
March 30, 1994
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has been a good neighbor in northern Anne Arundel County. The county Department of Planning and Code Enforcement says of all the long-term grading projects it regulates, BGE's Brandon Woods ash fill on Marley Neck has done a better job of complying than any other. Not surprisingly then, the utility questions the need for pending legislation that would limit how it uses fly ash -- a non-toxic waste byproduct from Brandon Shores' and Wagner Point's coal-fired generators -- to fill and grade the Brandon Woods site, which it intends to turn into an industrial park.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
After months of trying to reach a compromise with BGE, a group of Marley Neck residents says it has given as much ground as it can on a bill that would regulate the utility's fly ash fill.Residents have been working with county Councilman Carl G. "Dutch" Holland to draft legislation to limit the height and hours of operation of the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. fly ash fill operation next to the Brandon Woods Business Park. They also want a 200-foot buffer around the fill.But utility officials say they are dissatisfied with the bill and will try to have amendments introduced at tonight's public hearing that would allow them to operate longer and expand capacity at the fill.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2008
The Maryland Department of the Environment has filed a lawsuit against the Atlanta-based Mirant power company for allegedly allowing polluted water and heavy metals to escape from a fly ash landfill in Southern Maryland. The suit, filed by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Friday in Charles County Circuit Court, seeks millions in penalties and an end to coal ash dumping at the 38-year-old old Faulkner landfill. The state also wants to stop the flow of pollutants from the site. "Zekiah Swamp is one of the most significant ecological areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed," the suit from the Maryland Department of Environment reads.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
A group of Marley Neck residents is banding together in an effort to restrict future dumping of fly ash from Baltimore Gas and Electric's coal-fired generators at Brandon Shores and Wagner Point power plants.Although BG&E gave in to community pressure in September and withdrew a plan to create mounds of fly ash in the corner of an industrial park, community leaders say they believe BG&E's reversal may be only temporary."This is like round one of 12 rounds," said Carl Hackmann, spokesman for the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash. "We're set up for the long haul."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
In a major concession to Marley Neck residents, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials last night agreed to a provision in a bill that would require a public hearing before the utility could obtain a grading permit for the disposal of fly ash.The Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash sought the County Council bill -- and the amendment -- to require BGE to go through a special exception process before it could be granted a permit.BGE has used the fly ash, a waste byproduct from its coal-fired generators at the Brandon Shores and Wagner Point power plants, as structural fill material on two parcels of land across from the power plant since 1982.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | March 29, 1998
TO UNDERSTAND why BGE is vigorously fighting the prospect of having to install a $10 million clay liner in northern Anne Arundel County where it wants to dump millions of tons of fly ash, you might travel to Calvert Cliffs.There, BGE is spending millions of dollars on an interim storage facility to handle spent fuel from its two nuclear reactors. The tab so far is $23 million and will climb as long as the federal government fails to open a permanent storage site.Without a place to store its radioactive waste, Calvert Cliffs, which generates about half of BGE's base load, would shut down.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
It should come as no surprise that some people living in the vicinity of Key Bridge aren't thrilled by the idea of power plant fly ash showing up at a local landfill. In recent years, the effects of improperly handled coal ash have gotten a lot of attention, from the contaminated wells near a Gambrills landfill to the billion gallons of the stuff that accidentally spilled into the Tennessee River last year. But the question before the Maryland Department of the Environment is whether to allow 7.4 million tons of so-called "coal combustion byproducts" to be dumped in an industrial landfill that was built to higher specifications than the failed Gambrills site and is proposed to be upgraded further.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has asked Gov. Martin O'Malley to delay the construction of a proposed fly-ash landfill site in Southeast Baltimore, citing the landfill's proximity to the county and its ban on fly ash Leopold, who banned fly-ash and coal combustion byproducts in 2007 after the discovery that fly-ash dumping in Gambrills quarries was causing drinking water contamination, asked O'Malley to await the Maryland Department of...
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon | April 19, 2009
The General Assembly passed three environmental protection measures in its recently concluded session that affect fly ash, air quality and storm-water management, according to the county. The legislation strengthens existing regulations requiring air quality monitoring for coal fly ash and extends the statute of limitations for storm-water management plans to three years, providing consistent enforcement of environmental laws. The legislation also requires the state to include county reimbursement claims for environmental health monitoring and testing, in cases where the state collects fines.
NEWS
December 31, 2008
Gambrills residents, CEG reach water settlement A Baltimore judge approved a $54 million settlement yesterday between Constellation Energy and a group of Gambrills residents whose drinking water was contaminated by fly ash, a byproduct of burning coal. The energy company will create a $9.5 million fund for the residents of 84 homes that had contaminated wells and spend another $10 million to clean up and improve the former quarry where the ash was dumped, said the plaintiffs' attorney, William "Hassan" Murphy III. "What this settlement really says is that when community are affected by this problem, it's possible to solve it in a creative and positive way," said Murphy, managing partner of the Murphy Group, which worked with Peter G. Angelos' law firm to represent the residents.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
Fly ash regulations not strict enough I concur with The Baltimore Sun's editorial that said the Maryland Department of the Environment's new rules for disposing of coal fly ash are "not a full solution to the problem" ("Controlling coal ash," Dec. 5). The rules just do not adequately address the severity of the problem. In 2007, Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold secured County Council approval of a ban on the disposal of fly ash at any site in the county. Mr. Leopold took this action on this issue in response to a county groundwater investigation in Gambrills that concluded that combustion ash used as fill for mine reclamation presented potential health risks.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | November 1, 2008
A group of Anne Arundel County residents whose drinking water was contaminated with coal ash reached a multimillion-dollar settlement yesterday of its class action lawsuit against Constellation Energy Group. The deal, estimated at $45 million, gives about 600 residents living near a former Gambrills sand and gravel mine financial compensation and environmental remediation. For 12 years until last fall, Constellation worked with a contractor to dump billions of tons of waste ash from its Brandon Shores coal-fired power plant into an unlined former gravel mine pit. County tests found that 23 wells in the area tested positive for metals such as arsenic, cadmium and thallium, all components of waste ash from smokestacks, also called "fly ash."
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
A bill aimed at strictly regulating the disposal of fly ash has died quickly in committee.The bill was proposed by Del. Mary M. Rosso, an Anne Arundel County Democrat who is a longtime advocate of controlling the fine gray dust left when coal is burned.The legislation would have required owners of power plants -- namely Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. -- to build clay liners under the ash dumping ground and to monitor air and water quality.Delegates dropped the bill on a 16-2 vote Saturday in the Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
UM law dean plans to return to the faculty Karen H. Rothenberg, the first female dean of the University of Maryland School of Law, announced yesterday that she will step down at the end of the next academic year and return to the faculty of the downtown school. "We're thriving, so it's a perfect time to say, 'Let's move into our next transition,' and it's a good time for me personally," said Rothenberg, 55, who became law dean in 2000, after a year as interim dean, and is now in her 26th year with the school.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2008
The Maryland Department of the Environment has filed a lawsuit against the Atlanta-based Mirant power company for allegedly allowing polluted water and heavy metals to escape from a fly ash landfill in Southern Maryland. The suit, filed by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Friday in Charles County Circuit Court, seeks millions in penalties and an end to coal ash dumping at the 38-year-old old Faulkner landfill. The state also wants to stop the flow of pollutants from the site. "Zekiah Swamp is one of the most significant ecological areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed," the suit from the Maryland Department of Environment reads.
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