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By Stephen Wigler | October 10, 1996
No one interested in magnificent flute playing will want to miss Timothy Day's appearance with Pro Musica Rara Sunday afternoon at 3: 30 in the Meyerhoff Auditorium at the Baltimore Museum of Art.From 1976 to 1988, Day was the principal flutist of the Baltimore Symphony. He played with the sort of imagination and beauty that are not likely to be forgotten by anyone lucky enough to have heard him. Day, now professor of flute at the San Francisco Conservatory, will join the musicians of Pro Musica Rara in works by Telemann, Quantz and Rossi.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
With a riot of color onstage, Washington National Opera's presentation of "The Magic Flute" could not be more visually animated if it tried. There's a good deal to entertain the ears as well. This co-production with four other companies is, above all, a showcase for Japanese-born, Omaha-based artist Jun Kaneko. His set and costume design, a kind of pop art/classic Asian fusion, gives Mozart's opera a fresh flash of fantasy, not to mention whimsy. If there are times when the stylized look seems arbitrary (many of the projections suggest a digital Etch A Sketch)
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September 13, 2011
Harp and flute The Unitarian Universalist Congregation's Chalice Concert Series opens its 21st season with a "Framed Pairs: A Recital for Harp and Flute," Sat., Sept. 17, 8 p.m., at the Owen Brown Interfaith Cener (7246 Cradlerock Way, Columbia). This concert will showcase harpist Jacqueline Pollauf and flautist Rachel Choe performing the works of several classical composers. Tickets are $20 general, $15 for students 15-23 years old. Children younger than 15 are admitted free with a paying adult.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 7, 2013
A lot of contemporary classical music is being composed, but there are relatively few opportunities to hear it live. The Dancing Heart Flute and Piano Duo will be doing its part to provide modern music for modern ears with a concert for the Sundays at Three series on March 10 at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Comprising Karen Johnson on flute and Carlos-Cesar Rodriguez on piano, this duo is calling its program "American Spirit. " The 20th- and 21st-century composers on the bill are Lukas Foss, Joseph Schwantner, Robert Muczynski, Jeffrey Mumford, Manuel Ponce, Alberto Ginastera and Astor Piazzolla.
NEWS
By M.C. Helldorfer | August 16, 2000
Editor's note: When you love someone, you set them free so that someday they may return to you. Long ago there was a garden with walls that towered high as the trees, where vines climbed up leaf upon leaf, petal upon petal, to spread a canopy of flowers far above. Inside the garden lived one hundred rare and beautiful birds. A girl named Phoebe cared for them. But the birds had been collected by a king, and the garden belonged to his son. The prince was the same age as Phoebe and came there to play.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 27, 1994
The flute is a symbol in Mozart's "The Magic Flute" of male virility, and it has been associated historically with lusty male performers from the goat god Pan to James Galway. But as an orchestral instrument, the flute's high, white sound suggests purity; the flute is the perpetual ingenue of the orchestra -- its ice princess, if you will.In her solo recital last night in Friedberg Hall at the PeabodConservatory, Emily Controulis did not entirely escape that second reputation. Controulis, the principal flutist of the Baltimore Symphony and a professor at Peabody, has a focused, lovely sound, sure musical instincts, a secure technique and a virtuoso's confidence.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
JAMES GALWAY, the owner of gold-plated flutes and a 14-karat sound, has given up conducting and almost all teaching because they threaten to nibble away at his art, generally ranked at the top since he went solo in 1975."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2005
With its mix of fantasy, philosophy, masonic symbolism, humor, perplexity and, for contemporary tastes, political incorrectness, The Magic Flute represents as many challenges as pleasures. It's easiest, of course, to forget about any of the weighty or inconsistent elements in this opera and just soak up the endless enchantment of Mozart's music. Washington National Opera's production manages to deal with the plot and serve up the musical goods in equally enlightening fashion. Originally designed for the Los Angles Opera (Placido Domingo is general director of both companies)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 9, 2003
The New Music Ensemble, inaugurated last year at Towson University thanks to a gift from the Argosy Foundation, explores works for flute and clarinet tonight. The program offers a rare opportunity around here to sample work by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, whose subtle, intricate, highly individualistic style has earned her a prominent place in the music world today. Other intriguing composers represented on the concert include the largely self-taught Giacinto Scelsi, an eccentric Italian who was particularly noted for his exploration of the expressive possibilities in a single note (he died in the 1980s)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 7, 2000
When attempting to describe the warm, lustrous sound Emmanuel Pahud produces with his flute, some reviewers find themselves dipping into the vocal music vocabulary. Take, for instance, this review from the Cleveland Plain Dealer, which lauded Pahud for "blending the delicacy of an art song artist with the power of a prima donna." As it turns out, the analogy is pretty close to the mark. As the 29-year virtuoso explains, part of the secret behind his rich, creamy tone is that he relies on many of the techniques opera singers employ.
EXPLORE
September 13, 2011
Harp and flute The Unitarian Universalist Congregation's Chalice Concert Series opens its 21st season with a "Framed Pairs: A Recital for Harp and Flute," Sat., Sept. 17, 8 p.m., at the Owen Brown Interfaith Cener (7246 Cradlerock Way, Columbia). This concert will showcase harpist Jacqueline Pollauf and flautist Rachel Choe performing the works of several classical composers. Tickets are $20 general, $15 for students 15-23 years old. Children younger than 15 are admitted free with a paying adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's infrequent presentations of opera-in-concert over the past decade have included a repertoire well off the beaten path — Tchaikovsky's "Iolanta" in 2000 and Bartok's "Bluebeard's Castle" in 2005. This weekend, the focus is very familiar, very popular fare: Mozart's "The Magic Flute. " "It is the first opera I ever heard when I was a kid," said BSO music director Marin Alsop. "My dad told me the story and all about the secret codes, how the number 3 is important.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 9, 2010
Typically, when the character of Papageno the bird-catcher makes his entrance in Mozart's beloved opera "The Magic Flute," he's carrying a cage and, often, sporting a few feathers himself. When he appears in Opera Vivente's new production of the work, Papageno's most avian feature will be the word on his shirt — "Orioles." And don't be surprised if he's hoisting a Natty Boh. This isn't your father's "Magic Flute," hon. During the company's 12 seasons, John Bowen, founding general director of Opera Vivente, has frequently spiced and updated familiar works, which are always performed in English.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
Aristotle warned people that the flute just didn't have a good moral effect - "It is too exciting," he claimed - but that could only have made it more popular. Centuries later, the flute is still going strong, a regular component of orchestras and bands, and a vehicle for soloists all over the world. The instrument's lasting appeal can also be felt on Sunday nights at St. John's Lutheran Church in Parkville, when the 20 or so members of the Baltimore Flute Choir gather to rehearse.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
BUD SHANK, 82 Purveyor of "cool jazz" Bud Shank, 82, who brought Brazilian music to U.S. audiences, helped define "cool jazz" in the 1950s and played the dreamlike flute solo on the Mamas and the Papas' 1965 hit "California Dreamin'," died Thursday at his home in Tucson. He had a lung ailment. Mr. Shank's 60-year career took him from the big bands of the 1940s to the Hollywood studios and to renewed respect as an innovator late in life. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Dave Brubeck, Mr. Shank was one of the prime creators of the West Coast school of cool, a style of jazz seen as the relaxed, melodic counterpart of California life in the 1950s.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2009
In its English offering this week of Mozart's "The Magic Flute," Opera AACC calls upon the talents of Anne Arundel Community College faculty members, Maryland-based singers and 15 students from county elementary, middle and high schools. The shows, including today's at 3 p.m., will be presented at AACC's Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. James Harp, the artistic administrator of the Baltimore Opera, is the stage director of AACC's production, and Anna Binneweg, AACC's music director, is music director and conductor.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 2000
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra wrapped up its 17th season Wednesday evening with a pronounced Celtic accent. Never mind that the program at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium began with Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 5; you could probably argue that, in spirit at least, the third movement owes a little something to the folksy gigue. Otherwise, the concert was steeped in the tuneful directness of music from the British Isles and, by extension, Nova Scotia. The latter land was particularly well-represented.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 24, 1991
For the past three years, Randi Wixom, 16, who suffers from an undiagnosed neurological disease, has had to use crutches or a wheelchair to get around.To take her mind off her condition, Wixom plays the flute -- at home and, until last November, in a music class at Catonsville High.In November, the school prohibited the honor student from participating in the class because it feared for her safety and its liability if she were injured going to the class, accessible only by stairs. Wixom uses an elevator to get to other classes.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | March 15, 2008
What with certain goings-on in certain places -- I don't know, like maybe, um, New York? -- it's an unusually good week to be reminded about the virtues of steadfastness, tolerance and discretion, not to mention nobility, sincerity and purity. They all fuel Mozart's eternally endearing opera, The Magic Flute, currently playing to packed houses at the Peabody Conservatory. Thursday's cast, which performs tonight at a sold-out show, enjoyed a sprightly romp through the tuneful mix of fantasy and fable.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
Friends of the Howard County Library will sponsor a Family Movie Night at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Central Library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway. A film of the children's classic, Stuart Little, a story about the adventures of an intelligent mouse, will be screened. Refreshments will be provided. Registration is not needed. Information: 410-313-7860. Fugitive Brass Quintet, Flute Cocktail to perform The Oakland Nights Music Series, sponsored by the Town Center Community Association, will present a performance by two instrumental groups -- Flute Cocktail and Fugitive Brass Quintet -- from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. March 7 in the ballroom at Historic Oakland, 5430 Vantage Point Road.
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