Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFluoride
IN THE NEWS

Fluoride

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 11, 2000
An Allegany County judge cleared the way yesterday for Cumberland residents to vote on whether to lift the ban on putting fluoride in the city's water. Circuit Judge Frederick J. Sharer dismissed a lawsuit that sought to block Tuesday's referendum. The suit was filed by the Pure Water Committee, which is opposed to putting the cavity-fighting chemical into the water. The group objected to the way the Allegany-Garrett Dental Society collected more than 3,000 voter signatures to put the issue on the municipal ballot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Dr. H. Berton McCauley, former chief of the dental division of the Baltimore Health Department, who led the controversial battle that resulted in the city's water supply being fluoridated nearly 60 years ago, died Oct. 23 of prostate cancer at his Hadley Square home. He was 98. "He made the biggest public health impact with the fluoridation of Baltimore's drinking water. And think of all the kids it benefited," said Christian S. Stohler, dean of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 19, 1994
The sound of a drill in the mouth is becoming increasingly rare as Americans' need for dental fillings continues to decline.In 1990, according to the latest survey of 4,206 dentists in private practice, Americans received, per capita, half the number of fillings they required in 1959, even though they were four times as likely to have gone to the dentist.In 1959, more than one dental filling was needed for every man, woman and child, while in 1990, the latest year for which statistics have been compiled, the per capita filling rate was only 0.6.The main reasons for the plummeting rate of tooth decay, according to the American Dental Association, include fluorides in the drinking water, topical fluoride treatments and regular checkups.
NEWS
By Mary Ann Fergus and Mary Ann Fergus,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 28, 2007
Katelyn Patthana confidently slid into a chair to have her molars sealed, no big deal for a 7-year-old who had lived through a dental horror story. The suburban Chicago second-grader's tooth decay was so severe two years ago that dentists extracted six teeth, crowned two and filled five. Katelyn was among a growing number of preschoolers with cavities, creating concern among dentists and parents who hoped that brushing and avoiding candy were enough to silence the drills. But with continual snacking and the use of nonfluoridated bottled water on the rise, experts say parents have to be even more vigilant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- Cumberland voters overwhelmingly approved yesterday a bid to lift the city's decade-old ban on fluoridating its water supply, signaling a major shift in Western Maryland's traditional hostility to the widely accepted cavity-fighting chemical. By a vote of 2,525 to 1,633 in unofficial returns, residents opted to repeal a charter provision barring the addition of fluoride or any other "substance" to the city's drinking water. Thirty-three percent of the city's voters cast ballots in the referendum, which was voted on with a general election for mayor and City Council of the economically struggling Allegany County seat.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
CUMBERLAND - After decades of debate, an engineer will turn on a small electric pump this week or next to begin fluoridating this city's water - an event that is being welcomed by dentists but will be hard to swallow for a steadfast citizens group still wary of science's leading answer to cavities. "I won't drink it," says Cumberland retiree Mel Collins, who has purchased a water distiller to remove the offending additive. The federal government calls fluoride "safe and effective" and credits it for the steady decline of tooth decay during the past half-century.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- Crime, taxes and schools are the usual campaign fodder in municipal elections, but in two Western Maryland cities the burning topic this spring is one long ago settled in most communities without debate: fluoride. Barring a last-minute court ruling, Cumberland voters are to decide May 16 whether to repeal a decade-old ban on putting the cavity-fighting chemical in the city's drinking water. In neighboring Frostburg, candidates for mayor and council are squaring off over the fluoride issue as their June 6 election nears.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2000
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Fluoride has been a fighting word in Western Maryland for nearly 40 years. But with tooth decay rampant among children in the region, this former railroad resort in Garrett County is preparing to reopen the old debate about whether to put the cavity-fighting chemical in its drinking water. "The time for this has long since come," says Mayor Paul Shockey. The 65-year-old former county roads chief says that a citizen committee is expected Jan. 11 to recommend adding fluoride to the water the town furnishes to about 1,500 families on the outskirts of Oakland.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
One of the most hotly debated political issues in Western Maryland, one that in the not-too-distant past has eclipsed taxes and crime and jobs, is fluoride -- and whether it should be added to the drinking water. Though long ago settled in many communities with little conversation, how a candidate felt about fluoride could make or break a political career. On Thursday, a federal judge in Baltimore decided the issue for now, throwing out an anti-fluoride lawsuit. In 2001, after the cities of Frostburg and Cumberland finally agreed to fluoridate their water supplies, a group of anti-fluoride activists sued them for "mass-medicating" the public without its consent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Dr. H. Berton McCauley, former chief of the dental division of the Baltimore Health Department, who led the controversial battle that resulted in the city's water supply being fluoridated nearly 60 years ago, died Oct. 23 of prostate cancer at his Hadley Square home. He was 98. "He made the biggest public health impact with the fluoridation of Baltimore's drinking water. And think of all the kids it benefited," said Christian S. Stohler, dean of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Dr. Duncan W. Clark, 96 Voice for fluoridated water Dr. Duncan W. Clark, a public-health expert who became a persuasive advocate for adding fluoride to New York City's water supply in the early 1960s, when opponents claimed the health risks far outweighed the rewards, died Aug. 5 at his home in Brooklyn. He was 96. A specialist in preventive medicine, Dr. Clark lent a learned voice to the benefits to teeth and general health obtained by adding a minute amount of fluoride to the public water.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
A new study shows that if you're thirsty, tea is just as good for you as water - in fact, it's better, because it has chemicals in it that promote long-term health. Same goes, believe it or not, for coffee. Diuretics they may be, but you'd have to drink an impossibly strong cup of either to lose more fluid than you take in. Researchers have been busy on the hot stimulant front. One group found that eight cups of coffee a day significantly reduces the risk of cirrhosis of the liver. Another, which looked into the effects of coffee on elderly men in Finland, Italy and the Netherlands, found that those who drank three cups a day experienced less than half the cognitive decline seen in men who didn't drink coffee at all. And in research just reported in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, there was "clear evidence" that drinking three or more cups of tea a day reduces the risk of coronary heart disease.
NEWS
By MARLA CONE and MARLA CONE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2006
A national panel of scientists has charged the federal government with allowing too much fluoride in drinking water, which leaves children at risk of severe tooth enamel damage and adults prone to weakening of bones that could cause fractures. The Environmental Protection Agency requested that the National Academies' National Research Council re-examine its standard, which now allows a maximum of 4 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water. Some communities add fluoride to drinking water to protect against tooth decay, although in concentrations much lower than the EPA's standard.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
Taneytown has decided to look into the costs of fluoridating its water supply after a recent visit from a delegation of Carroll County and state officials and a handful of dentists praising its health benefits. Perhaps more persuasive than health benefits was information about federal and state grants -- available on a first-come, first-served basis -- that can help pay for engineering and startup costs. "Fluoridating the water supply is a major public health initiative," said Lois Bankert, the oral health care program coordinator for the Carroll County Health Department, who led a presentation to the Town Council during a work session last week.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
One of the most hotly debated political issues in Western Maryland, one that in the not-too-distant past has eclipsed taxes and crime and jobs, is fluoride -- and whether it should be added to the drinking water. Though long ago settled in many communities with little conversation, how a candidate felt about fluoride could make or break a political career. On Thursday, a federal judge in Baltimore decided the issue for now, throwing out an anti-fluoride lawsuit. In 2001, after the cities of Frostburg and Cumberland finally agreed to fluoridate their water supplies, a group of anti-fluoride activists sued them for "mass-medicating" the public without its consent.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
George M. Wyckoff Jr., a two-term mayor of Cumberland who presided over the first, brief introduction of fluoride into his city's water supply, died Friday at Cumberland Memorial Hospital. He was 74, and suffered from multiple organ ailments, his family said. Mr. Wyckoff, who owned the Cumberland Steel Co., was elected mayor in 1982. He served eight years before losing by 200 votes in the 1990 election to an anti-fluoride challenger. The campaign was dominated by debate over his support for putting cavity-fighting fluoride in the water.
NEWS
August 7, 2001
THE DECADES-OLD battle over adding fluoride to drinking water continues to rage in Cumberland, where the cavity-fighting chemical will go into the municipal system this month. Study after study shows that children drinking fluoridated water have fewer cavities and related dental problems. The Centers for Disease Control lists water fluoridation among the top public health achievements of the 20th century. Almost two-thirds of Americans drink water from systems that add fluoride. In the Cumberland area, there is strong legal opposition to fluoride.
NEWS
By MARLA CONE and MARLA CONE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2006
A national panel of scientists has charged the federal government with allowing too much fluoride in drinking water, which leaves children at risk of severe tooth enamel damage and adults prone to weakening of bones that could cause fractures. The Environmental Protection Agency requested that the National Academies' National Research Council re-examine its standard, which now allows a maximum of 4 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water. Some communities add fluoride to drinking water to protect against tooth decay, although in concentrations much lower than the EPA's standard.
NEWS
August 10, 2001
Bush's energy plan aids private interests, won't cut pollution The version of the Bush energy plan passed by the House of Representatives last week would transfer $27 billion from taxpayers to enormously polluting energy industries that are already earning record-setting profits ("House OKs oil drilling in Alaska," Aug. 2). That's not a bad return on the $18.4 million that the oil, coal, auto and nuclear industries gave to House members in the last election cycle. The Bush energy plan would do little to increase energy efficiency - the cleanest, cheapest, fastest way to save consumers money and reduce pollution.
NEWS
August 7, 2001
THE DECADES-OLD battle over adding fluoride to drinking water continues to rage in Cumberland, where the cavity-fighting chemical will go into the municipal system this month. Study after study shows that children drinking fluoridated water have fewer cavities and related dental problems. The Centers for Disease Control lists water fluoridation among the top public health achievements of the 20th century. Almost two-thirds of Americans drink water from systems that add fluoride. In the Cumberland area, there is strong legal opposition to fluoride.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.