Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlu Vaccine
IN THE NEWS

Flu Vaccine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ASSOCIAATED PRESS | November 30, 1991
ATLANTA (AP) -- The federal Centers for Disease Control yesterday downplayed reports by flu vaccine distributors that the early winter flu season is draining the supply of vaccine.The CDC said while there are shortages in some areas, there is still enough vaccine for the people the flu threatens the most -- the elderly and people with chronic lung and heart disorders.The New York Times reported yesterday that the manufacturers say they have sold virtually all the vaccine. But the companies refused to say how much they produced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
State health officials confirmed Thursday this season's first flu case. An Eastern Shore adult was hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza and later released, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The strain was A (H3), which was included in this year's flu vaccine, though officials did not say if the person was vaccinated. The first case last year was reported a week earlier, on Oct. 3. The flu season generally lasts until spring and most cases are not lab-confirmed or even reported because many people do not seek medical care.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | October 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans, especially the elderly and young children, should get vaccinated against flu in the coming months, federal health officials recommended yesterday. After dealing with past vaccine shortages, the officials expect there will be sufficient supplies available. Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommended the vaccinations for adults 50 and older, children ages 6 months to 5 years and people with chronic diseases, as well as all relatives and health workers who take care of them.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
Carroll County senior and community centers will hold flu and pneumonia vaccination clinics for residents ages 18 and older, in cooperation with the Health Department: Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at South Carroll, 5745 Bartholow Road, Eldersburg, 410-549-1357; and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Mount Airy, 703 Ridge Ave., 410-795-1017 or 301-829-2407. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at North Carroll, 2328 Hanover Pike, Hampstead, 410-386-3900. Oct. 30: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Westminster, 125 Stoner Ave., 410-386-3850.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Howard County has obtained 3,000 doses of flu vaccine for high-risk people, county health officials announced yesterday. The Health Department has not scheduled dates for vaccine clinics, but it will do so in the next few days, Howard County Health Officer Penny Borenstein said in a news release. The vaccine will be offered only to people in high-risk groups - including those over 65, those with serious chronic medical conditions and pregnant women. Proof of county residence and certification of those conditions will be required.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - As part of an effort to rebuild the country's limited supply of flu vaccine, federal drug regulators announced the fast-track approval of a new vaccine yesterday. Stocks dipped below necessary levels last year after regulators found contamination at the British plant of a major manufacturer. Food and Drug Administration officials, in approving Fluarix, an influenza vaccine for adults, said yesterday that the decision would be a significant boost toward ensuring an ample supply of vaccine.
NEWS
By Thomas Maier and Thomas Maier,NEWSDAY | November 3, 2004
A federal study will attempt to determine how many more people might die or be hospitalized during this flu season because of the shortage of flu vaccine. Some experts foresee thousands more flu-related deaths than usual. By Jan. 1, researchers for the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta plan to gather enough mortality and morbidity statistics from around the country to gauge what impact the lack of vaccine might have on fatalities from the influenza virus, which usually peaks during the winter.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
MedImmune Inc. reported yesterday that its third-quarter loss widened, partly because of acquisition-related costs, and said it doesn't expect its nasal-mist flu vaccine to be approved until next year. The Gaithersburg company also cautioned that even if it is approved, the FluMist vaccine that MedImmune has targeted to generate $1 billion annually in total sales within five years might initially be labeled for use only in those older than age 5, which would eliminate about 7 percent of the population for which the company had intended it. "I think the company may initially accept a somewhat narrower label of [ages]
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a telephone conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Maryland health officials confirmed Wednesday the first case of enterovirus D68, a somewhat rare type of respiratory infection that has been sweeping the country and largely sickening children with asthma and underlying health conditions. Doctors in Maryland had expected cases, though most were expected to be minor, or the equivalent of a cold that would not require medical attention. Serious cases can cause breathing problems for children. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the specimen was collected from a hospitalized child and sent to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for testing.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 6, 2014
Seasonal flu vaccine is only effective if the right virus strains of influenza are included. So the National Institutes of Health are tapping researchers at Johns Hopkins University and four other institutions to find better ways of identifying what's circulating. The result of the effort could be better protection from the flu, which kills thousands annually, and better preparation for an emerging pandemic, researchers said. Hopkins and the other institutions will contribute to NIH's existing Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance with the goal of controlling and lessening the impacts of influenza.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The company that runs malls in Towson, Columbia, Owings Mills and White Marsh is removing cellphone-recycling kiosks from its Maryland locations after politicians voiced concerns that the machines contribute to cellphone thefts, including a rash of robberies in north Baltimore last summer.. In August, at least five juveniles and one adult were arrested in a string of street robberies of pedestriands and joggers. Police said at the time that the suspects were thoght to be turing the machines in at Towson Town Center for cash.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
This year's flu season got off to an early start, and public health officials are asking people to get their vaccinations to ward off a serious outbreak. State health officials announced the first confirmed case Oct. 3: a child in the Washington suburbs. They said it came more than two weeks before the previous season's first case and earlier than any year in the last decade. Instances of flu-like activity are slowly rising, according to the Baltimore Health Department. Local officials said if enough people get vaccinated, the numbers can remain low. Plenty of vaccine is available in doctors' offices, drugstores and local health department clinics, they said.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | September 10, 2013
Flu shots are back -- at Giant Food and other area retailers. Giant is now offering the vaccinations at all in-store pharmacies with no appointment needed. Shoppers with a Giant Pharmacy Prescription Savings Card get $10 off the regular price, and most major insurance plans are accepted. And while supplies last, all customers who get a flu shot will also get a coupon book worth more than $40 in savings. Flu shots are also available at Rite Aid and Walmart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months or older, especially those at high risk.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2013
It's flu season in Baltimore. A few days after Christmas, Baltimore resident Kathleen Dudley began experiencing telltale signs of the flu - fever, chills, body aches, sore throat, cough and overall exhaustion. "The worst part - the fever and chills - lasted for about 24 hours," she says. "But the fatigue and cold symptoms lasted much longer. " According to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, between Oct. 1 and Jan. 5, 6,273 Marylanders tested positive for influenza; nearly 30 percent of those positive tests occurred during the week ending Jan. 5. "According to the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 16, 2005
The company whose contaminated plant touched off last year's flu vaccine shortage said yesterday that it won't be able to make all the doses promised for the 2005-2006 influenza season, raising the possibility of another vaccine shortage this fall. California-based Chiron Corp. blamed manufacturing problems for its inability to produce its promised U.S. supply of 25 million to 30 million flu vaccine doses. Chiron said it will be able to make 18 million to 26 million shots this year. A spokesman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said yesterday that it's possible U.S. health officials will have to prioritize during the coming flu season by providing flu shots first to high-risk populations such as the elderly and the seriously ill. Last fall, the United States unexpectedly lost half its flu vaccine - about 48 million doses - after British officials closed Chiron's Liverpool, England, Fluviron plant because of contamination problems.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | December 10, 2004
The University of Maryland School of Medicine is one of four institutions nationwide studying the safety of a foreign-made influenza vaccine to determine whether it can be licensed in the United States in time for next year's flu season. Beginning Monday, the school's Center for Vaccine Development will immunize 250 healthy people with a vaccine manufactured in Germany by the British pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline. The test product, Glaxo's Fluarix vaccine, has been used by an estimated 126 million people in more than 70 countries, including Great Britain and Australia, and is widely considered safe and effective.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Federal health officials declared this season's flu outbreak an epidemic Friday as Maryland hospitals and clinics continued to treat unusually high numbers of patients for the virus and manufacturers reported low supplies of the vaccine to treat the illness. The Centers for Disease Control said the virus is widespread in Maryland and 46 other states - the worst flu season in a decade. More than 15,000 Marylanders have visited emergency rooms and doctors' offices with flu-like symptoms this season, according to numbers updated Friday by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 10, 2013
It inevitably happens to people every flu season - they obediently get a flu shot only to catch the virus anyway. But don't blame the flu shot. Despite what many people believe, the flu shot doesn't cause the flu. The influenza viruses in the shot are dead and can't cause infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control. So why do people still get sick even after getting the shot? One explanation is they could have a different strain of the virus than the one the vaccine will fend off. Drug makers create each season's vaccine based on which strain they think will be prominent.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.