Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlu Season
IN THE NEWS

Flu Season

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 23, 2012
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that flu cases have begun to creep up in February, making it one of the latest starts to the influenza season in almost three decades. There are a few flu strains circulating, including H1N1, but they match those chosen for inclusion in this year's vaccine. Officials at the CDC and at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene still strongly recommend that people get vaccinated if they haven't already.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre 's new home in Remington are infectious — all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about 3 square feet.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
It's nearly spring, temperatures in the 70s, yet the flu waited until now to ramp up in Maryland, killing three members of a Calvert County family. Usually, flu season strikes earlier. By this time last year, the flu had been widespread and had already officially killed 34 people. The year before, the H1N1 pandemic disproportionately sickened children and triggered a scramble for vaccine. Public health officials say this is the nature of influenza. "Unlike other respiratory viruses, flu is a little more unpredictable," said Dr. Trish M. Perl, professor of medicine, pathology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University and the senior epidemiologist for the Hopkins Health System.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre's new home in Remington are infectious - all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about three square feet.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
Maryland is moving into flu season, but unlike last year, when the H1N1 flu pandemic triggered a scramble for vaccine, public health officials say there is plenty to go around. And that's important because for the first time the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccination — not just vulnerable groups. A CDC advisory committee made the universal call after last-year's late-breaking H1N1 pandemic disproportionately hit young people who were not in a high-risk category.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
The 2008-2009 influenza season is not quite over, but Maryland health officials say it appears to have peaked and the number of new cases is on the wane. "We expect lower levels of flu throughout the rest of the month of April, but it should finally be over by the beginning of May," said Rene Najera, an epidemiologist with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This flu season has been milder than last year's, Najera said, and he credits the design of this year's vaccine. "The vaccine strains were a better match" for the viruses actually circulating for most of this season, he said.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | December 31, 1991
An outbreak of the flu has young and old across the county snifflingand wheezing, coughing and sneezing.Growing numbers have come down with upper respiratory and stomach infections in the past week, county health officials and hospitals reported.Emergency rooms were crowded over the weekend with people seekingtreatment for fevers, coughs, diarrhea and other flulike symptoms. More than 70 patients were treated for minor complaints at North Arundel Hospital on Saturday and Sunday. Another 10 arrived at the emergency room in Glen Burnie yesterday morning, hospital spokesman Kevin Murnane said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - Hospital emergency rooms, doctors' offices and the nation's sinuses have been less congested this winter, the mildest flu season in at least six years. The 2000-2001 flu season, which began in October with vaccine shortages and rationing of flu shots, has turned out to be one of the least severe in recent memory for deaths, contagion and other effects on health, said Keiji Fukuda, chief of influenza epidemiology at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2001
For two area health companies, flu season is nothing to sneeze at. Passport Health, with national headquarters in Baltimore and nine offices in the area, does travel immunizations all year long. But in fall flu season, flu shots - generally at line-'em-up clinics sponsored by employers - make up 70 percent of Passport's business, according to Fran Lessans, the company's president and founder. Passport ordered 100,000 doses of flu vaccine in February - 15,000 for the Baltimore area, the rest for its nearly 40 national franchisees - to be ready for the season.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Liz Bowie, Howard Libit, Jackie Powder and Elaine Tassy contributed to this article | January 24, 1998
Though it will come as small comfort to anyone who is coughing, wheezing and sweating out a fever, health officials say the flu season of 1997-1998 is not shaping up to be a severe one.For those with ailing children parked in front of television sets, this winter may seem one of the worst in memory. But doctors and epidemiologists who track disease trends say the flu season has been about average and far less severe than last year's."It hasn't been terrible, not anything like last year, which hit early, hit real hard and then was gone," said Dale Rohn, chief of communicable disease surveillance for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The company that runs malls in Towson, Columbia, Owings Mills and White Marsh is removing cellphone-recycling kiosks from its Maryland locations after politicians voiced concerns that the machines contribute to cellphone thefts, including a rash of robberies in north Baltimore last summer.. In August, at least five juveniles and one adult were arrested in a string of street robberies of pedestriands and joggers. Police said at the time that the suspects were thoght to be turing the machines in at Towson Town Center for cash.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
After a slow start to flu season in Maryland, physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they are starting to see a jump in cases around the state. Trish M. Perl, a professor of medicine and pathology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said the major hospitals in Baltimore have treated more than a dozen patients for the flu in the past week, up from a handful of cases since flu season officially began in the U.S. "There's a lot of data now suggesting that flu is hitting in this area," Perl said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
This year's flu season got off to an early start, and public health officials are asking people to get their vaccinations to ward off a serious outbreak. State health officials announced the first confirmed case Oct. 3: a child in the Washington suburbs. They said it came more than two weeks before the previous season's first case and earlier than any year in the last decade. Instances of flu-like activity are slowly rising, according to the Baltimore Health Department. Local officials said if enough people get vaccinated, the numbers can remain low. Plenty of vaccine is available in doctors' offices, drugstores and local health department clinics, they said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Every flu season, doctors instruct their patients in the basics of respiratory etiquette: To limit spread of the disease, wash your hands, cover your mouth when you cough and practice good hygiene. The practices are based on the belief that the flu and other viruses pass from person to person through indirect or direct contact. Somebody coughs in another's face, or an infected person touches a doorknob that dozens of others then grab, and the disease spreads. But what if the flu isn't transmitted by direct or indirect contact?
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A Baltimore area child who died in December has tested positive for influenza, state health officials announced Friday, declaring it the first pediatric flu death in Maryland this winter. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene declined to release any other details about the case, beyond saying that influenza was confirmed through laboratory tests, and that the child had an underlying health condition. This is the first influenza-associated death of a Maryland child since the 2009-2010 flu season, according to the department, when two youths died.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2013
It's flu season in Baltimore. A few days after Christmas, Baltimore resident Kathleen Dudley began experiencing telltale signs of the flu - fever, chills, body aches, sore throat, cough and overall exhaustion. "The worst part - the fever and chills - lasted for about 24 hours," she says. "But the fatigue and cold symptoms lasted much longer. " According to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, between Oct. 1 and Jan. 5, 6,273 Marylanders tested positive for influenza; nearly 30 percent of those positive tests occurred during the week ending Jan. 5. "According to the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs and Tom Pelton and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
Despite delays and price gouging in the distribution of flu vaccines this fall, Maryland health officials said yesterday that they now have enough for all state residents and urged everyone to get the shots. The extra supply came just in time for the flu season. Yesterday, the state reported the season's first confirmed cases of the virus in a 10-year-old Baltimore girl and a 59-year-old Prince George's County woman, both of whom are in good condition. "People who may have been discouraged from getting their flu vaccinations earlier this season because of distribution problems, we are now encouraging them to come in and get their shots," Dr. Georges Benjamin, the state's health secretary, said at a news conference.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 9, 1997
Sniffle.Cough.Sneeze.Pass the tissues, please. The cold and flu season is upon us. And catching either illness is the last thing we need when there's so much to do. When we show up at work, everyone gives us the "you better-not-spread-whatever-you-have" look. When our kids show up sick at school or at the day-care center, they sometimes pass on their germs to others -- including their teachers.It's miserable.How can we avoid catching the cold or the flu? Dr. Gerald Wagner, a deputy health officer and medical director of an immunization program in California, offers information:What's the difference between a cold and a flu?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Federal health officials declared this season's flu outbreak an epidemic Friday as Maryland hospitals and clinics continued to treat unusually high numbers of patients for the virus and manufacturers reported low supplies of the vaccine to treat the illness. The Centers for Disease Control said the virus is widespread in Maryland and 46 other states - the worst flu season in a decade. More than 15,000 Marylanders have visited emergency rooms and doctors' offices with flu-like symptoms this season, according to numbers updated Friday by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 10, 2013
It inevitably happens to people every flu season - they obediently get a flu shot only to catch the virus anyway. But don't blame the flu shot. Despite what many people believe, the flu shot doesn't cause the flu. The influenza viruses in the shot are dead and can't cause infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control. So why do people still get sick even after getting the shot? One explanation is they could have a different strain of the virus than the one the vaccine will fend off. Drug makers create each season's vaccine based on which strain they think will be prominent.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.