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Flu Pandemic

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BUSINESS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
Leave it to Wall Street to find an investment opportunity in the potential onset of pandemic bird flu. Although it's unclear whether bird flu's spread around the world will result in a major U.S. public health threat, some in the investment community are beginning to place bets on potential hot stocks -- and potential losers -- should an outbreak arise. A report on avian flu by Citigroup, for example, cast as investment losers air-travel stocks and those related to public places such as malls, pubs and casinos.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
Maryland is moving into flu season, but unlike last year, when the H1N1 flu pandemic triggered a scramble for vaccine, public health officials say there is plenty to go around. And that's important because for the first time the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccination — not just vulnerable groups. A CDC advisory committee made the universal call after last-year's late-breaking H1N1 pandemic disproportionately hit young people who were not in a high-risk category.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2004
BANGKOK, Thailand - A day after Thai and international officials confirmed the first probable human-to-human transmission of a virulent strain of avian influenza in this country, public health systems around the globe were scrambling to prepare for a possible pandemic. Scientists say they cannot predict how quickly, if at all, the strain might develop the ability to spread easily among people, and whether it will remain as lethal as it has proven. The strain, A(H5N1), has killed 30 of the 42 Southeast Asians it infected in the past year, as well as millions of chickens and wild birds, across wide areas of Asia, and it has infected pigs, household cats and even zoo tigers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
This time last year, health officials were scrambling to protect kids going back to school against what was feared to be an exceptionally deadly flu outbreak. And while that scare has passed, they don't want parents to lower their guard as another academic year approaches. The H1N1 flu pandemic was far milder than anticipated and was officially declared over this week by the World Health Organization. But it disproportionately affected young people, and the message is still about vaccination.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
They gathered around a hotel conference table in Howard County, planning for what might be Maryland's worst public health crisis. The public health and safety experts spun a shocking scenario arising from the threat of an avian flu pandemic from Asia: 12,000 deaths in the state early on, with the possibility of many more later. More conservative estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest 1,600 to 3,700 Maryland deaths and 16,000 hospitalizations. But public health leaders can't be optimists.
FEATURES
February 15, 2006
With concern growing about a potential outbreak of avian flu, thoughts are turning to the last flu pandemic to hit the United States, in 1918. At its height in hard-hit Baltimore, one out every four people was ill. The Sun is seeking personal stories and recollections of life in Baltimore during the 1918 flu pandemic: family diaries, letters, photographs or other artifacts that tell us something about that time, including any stories that show how the...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Republican lawmakers are moving swiftly to enact one part of President Bush's flu plan - a liability shield for vaccine manufacturers - while issues such as compensation for people injured by adverse reactions and even funding for the proposal remain unresolved. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican, wants to attach the liability protections to a must-pass spending bill scheduled for quick action, spokeswoman Amy Call said yesterday. That would bypass the cumbersome process of committee hearings and floor deliberations in each chamber.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Paul.west@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Bethesda -- Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday that Maryland and other states will be better prepared to deal with a swine flu pandemic this fall because of problems encountered in coping with the outbreak earlier in the year. The Democratic governor made the remarks at the National Institutes of Health during a daylong meeting that brought state and federal officials together at a White House flu "summit." A national vaccination drive is likely to begin in mid-October, said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, who cautioned that no final decision has been made.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
Public Editor Paul Moore was on vacation last week, but readers were as busy as ever telling him what they liked and didn't like on the pages of The Sun. Here is a sampling of their e-mail comments: The flu pandemic Linell Smith's impressive special report on the impact of a the 1918 flu pandemic and an accompanying package of internet material on The Sun's Web site won rave reviews. The comments of Beverly Ann Weiman, whose grandmother lived through the epidemic, were typical. "Thank you so much for this article.
NEWS
By Jasmine Jernberg and Jasmine Jernberg,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2008
Scores of employees of the Anne Arundel County Department of Health and Fort Meade will descend on the county's two hospitals this morning with complaints of fevers, body aches and fatigue in a wide-ranging test of the county's preparedness to face a flu pandemic. Anne Arundel and Baltimore Washington medical centers will practice assessing a surge in patients to the emergency department, amid their own mock shortages in staff, while the Department of Health and the Office of Emergency Management will tackle their own challenges of having staff reduced by influenza and directing their remaining resources.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2009
Mary Lasky was in a meeting Tuesday when she got word that swine flu shots would be offered to all Marylanders, taking advantage of a statewide stockpile of vaccine that keeps growing as demand has waned. Two hours later, she was plugged into a conference call, helping to map out a strategy to disseminate some of that surplus to previously ineligible employees at all institutions within the Johns Hopkins University system. Such is the inherently unpredictable and demanding life of an emergency preparedness planner, a profession that took on deeper meaning after Sept.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 29, 2009
No one at the Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth was quite sure what to expect this week when they sat down in a stuffy conference room to host the center's first-ever online kids' "Webinar," on the H1N1 flu pandemic, dubbed Swine Online '09. As it turned out, 55 youngsters logged on from around the country - one as young as 8. And by instant message and telephone, they lobbed 115 questions at two Hopkins epidemiologists. "We were blown away," said a center spokesman, Charles Beckman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 29, 2009
No one at the Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth was quite sure what to expect this week when they sat down in a stuffy conference room to host the center's first-ever online kids' "Webinar," on the H1N1 flu pandemic, dubbed Swine Online '09. As it turned out, 55 youngsters logged on from around the country - one as young as 8. And by instant message and telephone, they lobbed 115 questions at two Hopkins epidemiologists....
NEWS
By Rob Stein and Rob Stein,The Washington Post | September 21, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Many state and local governments are not adequately prepared to deal with a surge of patients in a flu pandemic or quickly distribute vaccine and antiviral drugs, according to two reports by federal investigators being released today. An analysis of preparations by five states and 10 municipalities around the country found that many had failed to take steps crucial during a pandemic, such as recruiting health care workers to volunteer, creating systems to track hospital beds and medical equipment, and determining how to manage a patient load that exceeds what emergency rooms are able to handle.
NEWS
August 28, 2009
There is now little doubt the nation will experience a widespread -and perhaps severe - outbreak of the H1N1 virus this fall, traditionally the flu season in the Northern Hemisphere. Experts are still uncertain how virulent this particular flu strain, which has been circulating through the Southern Hemisphere in recent months, will be when it comes back our way, and they are monitoring it carefully for mutations that might render it more deadly. So far, there's no indication of that; according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, although H1N1 does spread easily, it remains a relatively mild strain of influenza.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Paul.west@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Bethesda -- Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday that Maryland and other states will be better prepared to deal with a swine flu pandemic this fall because of problems encountered in coping with the outbreak earlier in the year. The Democratic governor made the remarks at the National Institutes of Health during a daylong meeting that brought state and federal officials together at a White House flu "summit." A national vaccination drive is likely to begin in mid-October, said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, who cautioned that no final decision has been made.
NEWS
By Kathryn Hansen and Kathryn Hansen,SPECIAL TO BALTIMORESUN.COM | November 2, 2004
The year 1918 not only marked the last Boston Red Sox World Series victory, but also the worst flu pandemic in history. Eighty-six years had passed without much of a stir from either. But just as Boston's baseball team laid dormant all those years to surprise most this season with a comeback championship run, so too could another deadly flu pandemic. If the past is any indication, Baltimore is not immune to the destructive results of such an outbreak. When a new virus surfaces for the first time in humans, the population is left vulnerable to a pandemic.
NEWS
By Ruth G. Fesahazion | May 13, 2009
My stuffy nose, fever, sore throat and body pains got worse as the day progressed. With all the talk of swine flu - now called the H1N1 flu - I took my potentially contagious self to the emergency room. After checking in at the front desk, I sat and wait until they triaged me. Only after this did they give me a mask. By then, I had potentially passed my infection on to dozens of people. As I took my place in the waiting room, patients with nonflu symptoms took seats far away from me. Before long, all of us with matching masks were sitting next to each other.
NEWS
By Jasmine Jernberg and Jasmine Jernberg,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2008
Scores of employees of the Anne Arundel County Department of Health and Fort Meade will descend on the county's two hospitals this morning with complaints of fevers, body aches and fatigue in a wide-ranging test of the county's preparedness to face a flu pandemic. Anne Arundel and Baltimore Washington medical centers will practice assessing a surge in patients to the emergency department, amid their own mock shortages in staff, while the Department of Health and the Office of Emergency Management will tackle their own challenges of having staff reduced by influenza and directing their remaining resources.
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