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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 25, 2013
The flu continues to infect people in Maryland as state health officials described the intensity of the virus as high and widespread for the week ending January 19. But a report by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the flu activity appears to be hitting a plateau and beginning to trend downward. A total of 198 people were hospitalized for the week with flu-like symptoms and problems. About 59 percent, or 116 patients were older than age 65. No deaths were reported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
State health officials confirmed Thursday this season's first flu case. An Eastern Shore adult was hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza and later released, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The strain was A (H3), which was included in this year's flu vaccine, though officials did not say if the person was vaccinated. The first case last year was reported a week earlier, on Oct. 3. The flu season generally lasts until spring and most cases are not lab-confirmed or even reported because many people do not seek medical care.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho | October 12, 2009
Tracey Haldeman is not taking any chances with her business being disrupted this flu season. So the president of Baltimore's Pinnacle Communications is providing an attractive incentive for her eight employees to get vaccinated for both the seasonal and H1N1 viruses: an hour of free personal training and a paid day off. "We're a small firm and all our staff is senior level," said Haldeman. "When we have one person out for an extended period of time, it could impact what we do for clients.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
State health officials say today that lab tests confirm all four members of a Calvert County family striken with a severe respiratory illness in recent weeks had the H3N2 strain of influenza A, a strain of the flu that has been going around this season. Three have since died. At least two of the cases were complicated by bacterial infections with methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, according to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene . Additional lab testing and investigation continue, but the health officials said there still have been no other clusters of severe respiratory illness in the state discovered.
SPORTS
By La Velle E. Neal III, Star Tribune | April 18, 2011
First baseman Justin Morneau on Monday missed a second straight game with the flu, remaining at the team hotel during the afternoon while the Twins prepared to play Baltimore. Sound familiar? Catcher Joe Mauer just spent the weekend laid up in a St. Petersburg hotel with what turned out to be a viral infection. Morneau was supposed to arrive at Camden Yards by game time to be examined by doctors. Twins manager Ron Gardenhire had no idea when he might have Morneau available to insert into the lineup.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Lou Ruth Blake was the family's matriarch who sang in the church choir and organized gospel shows. Lowell Frederick Blake liked to make people laugh. Venessa Marie Blake was the ardent churchgoer with a contagious smile. All three family members died within days of each other earlier this month from complications of the flu — a cluster that state officials acknowledged was unusual. Their deaths caused a stir in the community of Lusby in Calvert County, where Blake family roots run deep in the town of nearly 1,600.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 7, 1995
A LOT of us have gotten the flu this year. However, most of us suffered through it with nothing more than temporary pains, fevers and coughs.It was nothing like the flu and pneumonia that swept the country in 1918. Baltimore was second only to Philadelphia in the number deaths per thousand residents caused by the epidemic.In 1918, 7 out of every 1,000 Baltimoreans who got the flu or pneumonia died -- for a total of 3,742 fatalities; more than 80,000 people died nationally. Baltimore's undertakers were overwhelmed by bodies; many burials had to be delayed for an unacceptably long time.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Just as flu activity has begun to pick up in Maryland, state health officials are relaxing restrictions on those eligible to receive vaccine to prevent it. Following the lead of the nation's top public health agency, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene announced yesterday that everyone age 50 and older should be able to get a shot. Because of the nationwide vaccine shortage, vaccinations had been limited on a voluntary basis to those 64 and older, those with chronic illnesses, pregnant women, children younger than 2 and health care workers.
SPORTS
By Eduardo Encina, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The Orioles will host the Pittsburgh Pirates this afternoon at Ed Smith Stadium for their final spring training meeting. Kevin Gausman will make the start today for the Orioles. He's allowed two runs and four hits over seven Grapefruit League innings with five strikeouts and two walks. In his last outing, he allowed one run and three hits in three innings with four strikeouts and no walks. Among the available pitchers today are Zach Britton, Troy Patton, Tommy Hunter, Steve Johnson and Evan Meek.
NEWS
September 20, 2014
It may be reasonable to be prepared in case Ebola presents in the U.S., but would our population not do better to listen to rational information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other authoritative sources? Flu presents a real, proven threat to health, life and productivity in the U.S. ( "The Ebola threat," Sept. 16) We would do well to have our flu shot before concerning ourselves with a less-easily-contracted illness which has no record of originating here.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 6, 2014
Seasonal flu vaccine is only effective if the right virus strains of influenza are included. So the National Institutes of Health are tapping researchers at Johns Hopkins University and four other institutions to find better ways of identifying what's circulating. The result of the effort could be better protection from the flu, which kills thousands annually, and better preparation for an emerging pandemic, researchers said. Hopkins and the other institutions will contribute to NIH's existing Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance with the goal of controlling and lessening the impacts of influenza.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Orioles are still battling a lingering flu as they head into this afternoon's series finale against the Tampa Bay Rays at Camden Yards. Tomorrow's off day probably couldn't come at a better time. Illness has struck so many players that the entire home clubhouse at Camden Yards was disinfected, all the way down to the ping-pong paddles and pool sticks. “Unfortunately, a lot of it is contagious before you really know you've got it,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
The flu that hit the Orioles clubhouse last week affected two more players Tuesday. The Orioles sent center fielder Adam Jones and right-handed relief pitcher Evan Meek home from Camden Yards before the game against the Tampa Bay Rays was postponed because of rain. Neither player would have been available if the Orioles and Rays would have played. “From what I understand, it's going on all over,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. “It's not just in our locker room. Unfortunately, a lot of it is unavoidable other than don't touch or communicate with people all day. That's pretty hard to do in this sport.
SPORTS
By Eduardo Encina, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The Orioles will host the Pittsburgh Pirates this afternoon at Ed Smith Stadium for their final spring training meeting. Kevin Gausman will make the start today for the Orioles. He's allowed two runs and four hits over seven Grapefruit League innings with five strikeouts and two walks. In his last outing, he allowed one run and three hits in three innings with four strikeouts and no walks. Among the available pitchers today are Zach Britton, Troy Patton, Tommy Hunter, Steve Johnson and Evan Meek.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre 's new home in Remington are infectious — all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about 3 square feet.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Point guard Pe'Shon Howard will sit out tonight's game here at Florida State because of the flu, a Maryland athletic department spokesman said. Zack Bolno said Howard remained in College Park after the team left Tuesday. Howard had lost his starting job three games ago when second-year coach Mark Turgeon moved sophomore Nick Faust (City) to the point. Howard played 21 minutes in Saturday's 84-64 loss at Duke because freshman guard Seth Allen was benched for disciplinary reasons and played just 10 minutes.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
The first laboratory-confirmed case of seasonal flu was reported Friday by state health officials, who are using the milestone to remind residents to get vaccinated for the virus. The case involves an adult in the Baltimore region, and comes two months later than the first case reported last season. The flu is spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing or contact with an infected person. Symptoms usually begin a few days later and include fever, body aches, fatigue, coughing and sore throat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The good vibrations inside Single Carrot Theatre's new home in Remington are infectious - all the more apt considering that the inaugural production is called "The Flu Season. " Stepping into the venue, which once housed a tire repair shop, is a lift in itself. The place is such a far cry from the tiny spot at Load of Fun on North Avenue, where the company had its longest residency. There's even an honest-to-goodness lobby; the one at Load of Fun seemed to be about three square feet.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The company that runs malls in Towson, Columbia, Owings Mills and White Marsh is removing cellphone-recycling kiosks from its Maryland locations after politicians voiced concerns that the machines contribute to cellphone thefts, including a rash of robberies in north Baltimore last summer.. In August, at least five juveniles and one adult were arrested in a string of street robberies of pedestriands and joggers. Police said at the time that the suspects were thoght to be turing the machines in at Towson Town Center for cash.
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