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By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | August 10, 2006
I don't know if Floyd Landis has a steroid problem, but he sure does have another kind of problem, the same one Paris Hilton has and Madonna and Mel Gibson when he's loaded and the cops pull him over: He just won't shut up. Did you see Landis with Jay Leno the other night? Apparently, the disgraced Tour de France winner is now determined to plead his case on every single talk show in America. In the past few days, he's done just about every show except Dr. Phil's, and that's probably just around the corner.
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By From Baltimore Sun news services | September 11, 2008
Cassell says he'll retire after 2008-09 season nba Baltimore native and three-time NBA champion Sam Cassell said yesterday that he plans to become an assistant coach with the Boston Celtics after playing one more season. A guard who was part of the Celtics' title run this past season, Cassell, 38, told a reporter about his plans shortly before speaking at a City Hall news conference. "This is my last year playing with the Celtics," he said. "Next week, I'll sign the contract." After finishing the 2008-09 season, he plans to exercise an option to join the coaching staff.
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By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Farmersville, Pa.-- --To fully digest the story of cyclist Floyd Landis, to grasp how exactly it is that a 30-year-old man with chronic, stabbing pain in his right hip can possibly be contending in this year's Tour de France despite the fact that he will have his hip replaced once the race ends, one must start at the beginning. One must travel through the endless green and gold cornfields of Lancaster County, and cross over the muddy banks and murky waters of the Conestoga River. Only then, arriving in this quiet town of barely 200 people where Landis was raised, can a visitor truly appreciate how his family's Mennonite faith shaped his character and work ethic as a young man, while at the same time frustrated him to the point of rebellion, leaving him no choice but to move across the country and pursue a dream, despite his parents' promise that he would face eternal damnation if he kept cycling.
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By BILL ORDINE | September 22, 2007
Floyd Landis, the Mennonite-turned-bicycle racer, was stripped of his Tour de France yellow jersey when a three-person arbitration panel upheld a positive test result that quickly cast a shadow over his comeback win in 2006. Just as he was closing in on his victory in France when all the world was enthralled, I was dispatched to Farmersville in Lancaster County, Pa., to find his parents. I caught up with Arlene and Paul Landis, who are Mennonites, at a modest picnic in a neighbor's backyard.
SPORTS
September 21, 2007
Good morning -- Floyd Landis -- You probably never thought you looked that great in yellow anyway.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | September 22, 2007
Floyd Landis, the Mennonite-turned-bicycle racer, was stripped of his Tour de France yellow jersey when a three-person arbitration panel upheld a positive test result that quickly cast a shadow over his comeback win in 2006. Just as he was closing in on his victory in France when all the world was enthralled, I was dispatched to Farmersville in Lancaster County, Pa., to find his parents. I caught up with Arlene and Paul Landis, who are Mennonites, at a modest picnic in a neighbor's backyard.
NEWS
July 25, 2006
Cyclist Floyd Landis -- who this past weekend became the third American, after Lance Armstrong and Greg LeMond, to win the prestigious Tour de France -- and all you other spokeheads out there who think the sound of the wind rushing past your ears is a paean to a healthful pastime and a clean environment are making things tough for the rest of us. You may believe you're conserving energy because you ride a bicycle. But, according to a professor at the Wharton School in Philadelphia, you're mistaken.
SPORTS
By JOHN JEANSONNE and JOHN JEANSONNE,NEWSDAY | July 25, 2006
Even as the bouquets of praise are piling up for Floyd Landis, in recognition of his improbable, theatrical Tour de France victory that concluded Sunday, the real flowers offering sympathy and get-well wishes aren't far away. Landis said yesterday that he hopes to have hip replacement surgery "in the next month" and admitted he is optimistic but uncertain about his cycling career after the operation. During an afternoon conference call from Paris, Landis - suddenly a sports celebrity at age 30 - acknowledged he is "a little bit" nervous about the procedure to fix his right hip bone, which has been withering from a lack of blood flow since a 2003 crash.
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By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2007
Chicago -- During the first 15 years after my trip to Belgium to interview Greg LeMond a few months before the first of his three Tour de France victories in 1986, I frequently had access to live coverage of the race while vacationing in Europe. I soon found myself utterly - and surprisingly - mesmerized by what at first glance seemed little more than two or three hours of wheels spinning. Seven years ago, when Outdoor Life Network began providing the same coverage to viewers in the United States, I paid for digital cable (the network since has been renamed Versus)
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2006
Floyd Landis was a feel-good story in a sport that desperately needed one. Bicycle racing, plagued with doping virtually as long as people have pushed pedals in anger, had started this year's Tour de France under a familiar cloud. The two top favorites and several other contenders were kicked out because of allegations that they were involved in a doping ring in Spain. There was no final verdict of guilt, just evidence, but in a sport trying to rid itself of a chemical-enhanced image, that is all it takes to get banned.
SPORTS
September 21, 2007
Good morning -- Floyd Landis -- You probably never thought you looked that great in yellow anyway.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2007
Chicago -- During the first 15 years after my trip to Belgium to interview Greg LeMond a few months before the first of his three Tour de France victories in 1986, I frequently had access to live coverage of the race while vacationing in Europe. I soon found myself utterly - and surprisingly - mesmerized by what at first glance seemed little more than two or three hours of wheels spinning. Seven years ago, when Outdoor Life Network began providing the same coverage to viewers in the United States, I paid for digital cable (the network since has been renamed Versus)
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | August 10, 2006
I don't know if Floyd Landis has a steroid problem, but he sure does have another kind of problem, the same one Paris Hilton has and Madonna and Mel Gibson when he's loaded and the cops pull him over: He just won't shut up. Did you see Landis with Jay Leno the other night? Apparently, the disgraced Tour de France winner is now determined to plead his case on every single talk show in America. In the past few days, he's done just about every show except Dr. Phil's, and that's probably just around the corner.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2006
Floyd Landis was a feel-good story in a sport that desperately needed one. Bicycle racing, plagued with doping virtually as long as people have pushed pedals in anger, had started this year's Tour de France under a familiar cloud. The two top favorites and several other contenders were kicked out because of allegations that they were involved in a doping ring in Spain. There was no final verdict of guilt, just evidence, but in a sport trying to rid itself of a chemical-enhanced image, that is all it takes to get banned.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 1, 2006
It has been exactly one year since news broke of Rafael Palmeiro's positive steroid test - and what have we learned? Steroid testing and discipline are tougher than ever, but - judging by the Tour de France testosterone flap involving Floyd Landis - the quality of the excuses has not improved at all. Landis continues to profess his innocence and insist he has a naturally occurring elevated level of testosterone, even though multiple tests before his...
SPORTS
By ALAN ABRAHAMSON and ALAN ABRAHAMSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2006
Floyd Landis, champion of the 2006 Tour de France, declared yesterday that he had raced clean and that he "deserved to win." Speaking at a news conference in Madrid, Landis said he has naturally high "parameters" of the hormones testosterone and epitestosterone. Those levels, he said, explain why a doping test produced an irregular result after his breakaway Stage 17 win in the Alps on July 20 that sparked his historic victory. "We will explain to the world how this is not a doping case but a natural occurrence," Landis said, adding that he intends to show "convincingly and categorically" that his winning ride was the product only of "many years of training" and "my complete devotion to cycling."
NEWS
July 25, 2006
Cyclist Floyd Landis -- who this past weekend became the third American, after Lance Armstrong and Greg LeMond, to win the prestigious Tour de France -- and all you other spokeheads out there who think the sound of the wind rushing past your ears is a paean to a healthful pastime and a clean environment are making things tough for the rest of us. You may believe you're conserving energy because you ride a bicycle. But, according to a professor at the Wharton School in Philadelphia, you're mistaken.
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