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By Photos by David Hobby and Photos by David Hobby,Sun photographer | April 23, 2007
At Frank's Nursery in Columbia, the tardy arrival of spring has made for extra work to ensure the plants stay healthy as they wait for new owners. The cold is a factor, notes Frank Rhodes Jr., but the wind is especially dangerous to young plants. As a result, plants are staying in the greenhouses longer than normal this year. But Mother's Day, which is on May 13, and customers' spring gardening plans won't wait. So the flowering plants have to be ready. Temperatures are expected to be more seasonable this week.
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NEWS
By Photos by David Hobby and Photos by David Hobby,Sun photographer | April 23, 2007
At Frank's Nursery in Columbia, the tardy arrival of spring has made for extra work to ensure the plants stay healthy as they wait for new owners. The cold is a factor, notes Frank Rhodes Jr., but the wind is especially dangerous to young plants. As a result, plants are staying in the greenhouses longer than normal this year. But Mother's Day, which is on May 13, and customers' spring gardening plans won't wait. So the flowering plants have to be ready. Temperatures are expected to be more seasonable this week.
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NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
Short on space, but want to garden? Consider hanging baskets.Hanging baskets can be arranged for any space or personal preference. Ifyou buy your hanging basket, you can expect standard sizes, such as 6", 8" or 10" pots. You can expect to pay between $5 and $50 depending on the size and plants in the hanging basket.The first thing to consider in choosing a hanging basket is whereit will hang. What lighting conditions will the plant have?Plant expert Laurie Collins, from the new Earthtones Garden Shop at 40 Church Road in Arnold, said, "Outdoor hanging baskets will use native plants from all over the world.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 7, 2007
Amy Lamb's stunning floral photographs, on view at Steven Scott Gallery in Owings Mills, inspire wonder on so many levels - aesthetic, symbolic, scientific and metaphysical - that it almost seems a cop-out to enjoy them purely as visual embodiments of sensuous delight. But surely they are that, too. Lamb has said that her photographs of rare flowers and plants are comparable to portraits; her images are as much character and personality studies as they are precise physical descriptions.
NEWS
By Carol Kaesuk Yoon and Carol Kaesuk Yoon,New York Times News Service | February 28, 2000
Ninety million years ago, on what is now an empty lot in Sayreville, N.J., a flower-filled tropical forest stood in flames, its many blossoms burning and smoldering away not into ashy oblivion, but into paleontological perpetuity. For, as scientists now know, the fires that periodically swept these woods so long ago preserved its blooms as perfect charcoal fossils, creating the most bountiful and exquisitely preserved cache of ancient flowers in the world. Biologists at Cornell University have uncovered more than 200 species of fossil flowers at the site, including ancient relatives of carnations, cactuses, teas, azaleas, water lilies, oaks, pitcher plants and magnolias.
NEWS
September 10, 2000
Q. I have a terrible kind of grass growing in my flower beds. I've never seen it before. It's a yellowish green color, is hard to pull up and is flowering now. The leaves grow in groups of three. Could it have come in the mulch I put down in the spring? How do I get rid of it? I try to grow organically and prefer not to use herbicides. A. You have nutsedge, a.k.a. nutgrass. Botanically, it's a sedge, not a grass; sedges have triangular stems. This a difficult weed to control. It spreads primarily by rhizomes (underground stems)
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
The winter isn't even half over. It'll be a while before we pick our first daffodil, and most of us are pretty tired of that Christmas poinsettia that is dropping bracts and leaves on the floor. A new houseplant will help us through the winter doldrums.There are thousands, perhaps millions of houseplants to choose from and many conditions you should consider so that your plant will do well (and not add to your doldrums). Be sure, suggests Brian Durkin, greenhouse manager of Watson's on York Road in Lutherville, to consider what your home can support, in terms of size and light especially.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 11, 2002
Q. While I was on vacation, a weedy vine engulfed many of my flowers. My neighbor calls it bindweed. How can I get rid of it without damaging my flowers? A. Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis, is a perennial vine that looks and grows very much like morning glory. In fact, they are in the same family. If it gets established in beds, it will twine itself around your flowering plants and can be difficult to pull without damaging your flowers. It spreads not only by seed, but also by underground runners and is therefore difficult to control.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | December 14, 2003
Last December I received a Christmas cactus in full bloom as a gift. It still looks good, but it is not blooming this year. Why? Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii) is an epiphytic tropical plant that grows in the trees of some South American forests. As with other flowering plants, bud formation and blooming in Christmas cactus is triggered by day length and outdoor temperatures found in their natural environment. When plants are taken out of their natural environment and placed in very different conditions, they may not bloom.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
KALAHEO, Hawaii - Imagine a place where the living is so easy that the only issue is: What's the best way to have sex? There would be fantastical flirtations, in raiment ranging from the beautiful to the bizarre. A few solitary types would decide that attracting a partner was just too much trouble. But many more would seek out pairings that, over time, became intensely intimate. For up to 5 million years, that's the way life evolved among the flowering plants of Hawaii. Seeking to mate fertile pollen with unformed seeds, the plants developed wiles for luring birds, bees and bugs into their reproductive schemes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
Watch a bunchberry open its petals next month - if you can. Scientists who videotaped the explosive blooming of the little-known flower say it's the fastest motion ever recorded in a plant - action that will be on display in Maryland and much of the rest of the United States in the coming weeks. Cornus canadensis, as it's known scientifically, opens its petals in less than a thousandth of a second and shoots pollen into the air with the force of a rocket launcher. "It really is pretty cool," said Joan Edwards, a biologist at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
It was a dark and stormy night, and officials at Verizon Communications, T. Rowe Price and other downtown Baltimore corporate giants met over dinner to do something they had never done before. At Harborplace's M&S Grill, they collectively focused on flowers. And the plan they hatched, much sunnier than the evening's steady rain, was to turn the somewhat barren McKeldin Plaza into a prettier place. The result is an $18,000 replanting to beautify the Inner Harbor's paved doorstep, daily traipsed upon by thousands of baseball fans, office workers and conventioneers.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | December 14, 2003
Last December I received a Christmas cactus in full bloom as a gift. It still looks good, but it is not blooming this year. Why? Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii) is an epiphytic tropical plant that grows in the trees of some South American forests. As with other flowering plants, bud formation and blooming in Christmas cactus is triggered by day length and outdoor temperatures found in their natural environment. When plants are taken out of their natural environment and placed in very different conditions, they may not bloom.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2003
Your home, with its warm, dry air and handsome window treatments, may be a delight for people. But to a houseplant, it can be a hostile environment. Many of the plants we like to grow indoors hail from tropical, subtropical or desert lands where they evolved to need more light and much better drainage than they typically get in the living room. A plant that comes from a moist rain forest can have a hard time in the dry air of a centrally heated apartment. So how can you help plants survive in your home?
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
For years, Peggy Duke made a career creating precise pen-and-ink drawings of plant structures for books and manuals, painstakingly showing the multitude of hairs in the roots, the minute details of the leaves and the shape of individual petals. Then, about 15 years ago, she discovered Oriental brush painting, a style at the other end of the artistic spectrum, with its broad, loose strokes and liberal use of ink. Called Sumi-e, or black ink, (although many artists, including Duke, use color)
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | August 11, 2002
Q. While I was on vacation, a weedy vine engulfed many of my flowers. My neighbor calls it bindweed. How can I get rid of it without damaging my flowers? A. Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis, is a perennial vine that looks and grows very much like morning glory. In fact, they are in the same family. If it gets established in beds, it will twine itself around your flowering plants and can be difficult to pull without damaging your flowers. It spreads not only by seed, but also by underground runners and is therefore difficult to control.
SPORTS
By GARY DIAMOND | March 7, 1993
Two decades ago, Harford County was a rural farming community, far removed from metropolitan Baltimore. Bel Air, the county seat, was a sleepy town, surrounded by mid-sized farms and dense stands of hardwood trees. Until a few years ago, a small herd of dairy cows could be seen grazing on a farm a few hundred yards from busy Harford Mall.That farm is now a huge shopping center. A few miles away, on new Route 24, thousands of homes, condos and apartments cover land previously inhabited by whitetail deer, ring-neck pheasant, gray squirrel, bobwhite quail, fox, raccoon, opossum and nearly 50 species of birds.
NEWS
By ROSLIE M. FALTER | October 17, 1994
Artisans and organizers have been busy for months at Ferndale United Methodist Church preparing for their annual October Fest. Everything will be ready for presentation from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.Look for gifts, Christmas decorations and ornaments, floral arrangements, wreaths and woodcrafts. Add to that, scarecrows made to order, other Halloween items, homemade baked goods, pit beef sandwiches, soup and apple pies made by the United Methodist Men and other delectable items.This event is one of the major fund-raisers supporting the ministry and mission goals of the church.
NEWS
By Julie Hirshfeld Davis and Julie Hirshfeld Davis,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
Each spring, flower lovers for miles around flock to Sherwood Gardens to gaze at its now-famous array of 80,000 tulips. But come Memorial Day, the tulip-gazers are gone, and the garden is transformed from a palette of vibrant color to a blank - if not completely clean - slate. What few outside of the surrounding streets of Guilford know is that Memorial Day is not the end of the garden's splendor, but the beginning of a quieter, more casual custom that keeps Sherwood Gardens blooming for several more months and transforms its neighbors into summer horticulturists.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
KALAHEO, Hawaii - Imagine a place where the living is so easy that the only issue is: What's the best way to have sex? There would be fantastical flirtations, in raiment ranging from the beautiful to the bizarre. A few solitary types would decide that attracting a partner was just too much trouble. But many more would seek out pairings that, over time, became intensely intimate. For up to 5 million years, that's the way life evolved among the flowering plants of Hawaii. Seeking to mate fertile pollen with unformed seeds, the plants developed wiles for luring birds, bees and bugs into their reproductive schemes.
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