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April 5, 2012
The setting was more than a century-and-a-half old, but the flowers were fresh Saturday, March 31 at Whipps Garden Cemetery's fifth annual Daffodil Day. "We had a lot of people, and we sold lots of flowers," said Aleta Gravelle, director of the Friends of Whipps Cemetery and Memorial Gardens. The daffodils were past their peak she said, but the grounds had plenty of Virginia Bluebells and celandine poppies. Located on St. John's Lane, in Ellicott City, Whipps dates back to 1855, and the last burial there was in 1915.
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April 5, 2012
The setting was more than a century-and-a-half old, but the flowers were fresh Saturday, March 31 at Whipps Garden Cemetery's fifth annual Daffodil Day. "We had a lot of people, and we sold lots of flowers," said Aleta Gravelle, director of the Friends of Whipps Cemetery and Memorial Gardens. The daffodils were past their peak she said, but the grounds had plenty of Virginia Bluebells and celandine poppies. Located on St. John's Lane, in Ellicott City, Whipps dates back to 1855, and the last burial there was in 1915.
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NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2009
On a frigid winter's day inside his suburban Maryland home, Jim Duke is sipping a cup of hot tea made from nature's bounty. If it were a balmy winter or early spring day, he would pick rosemary and lavender from his garden to make the pale brew. Instead, he steeps some of their dried leaves, then adds a whole flower that resembles an inverted daffodil. The tea preparation isn't just about chasing winter's chill. A month shy of his 80th birthday, Duke believes the herbs and flowers in his homemade tea are good for his memory and overall health.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Online refer: For more garden photos, go to baltimoresun.com/travel. For more information on gardening, read Susan Reimer 's blog at baltimoresun.com/gardenvariety When Cheval Opp retired from IBM, she knew exactly what she would do with her time. Visit gardens. "My whole life at IBM, whenever they would send me anywhere, I would take an extra day or a weekend and visit gardens," she said. "When I realized I'd be retiring and I could do anything I wanted, I knew what it would be. " Now Opp helps travelers and day trippers arrange tours of the many public gardens in the Mid-Atlantic area.
NEWS
December 17, 1993
Westminster's city government deserves congratulations: It may have recovered the state's offer to landscape the Route 140 median strip after the Carroll County commissioners nearly fumbled away the project.City officials realized the folly of spurning $100,000 of bushes and trees because there might be some maintenance costs involved. The commissioners' rejection of the offer was akin to someone forfeiting a Lotto jackpot because the winnings are taxed.Although city officials can reap considerable political benefits from this sensible action, the council took up the State Highway Administration's offer because it is in keeping with Westminster's past beautification efforts.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 17, 1993
You know how a lot of women go around shaking their heads and muttering: "Boy, men just don't get it, do they?"I'll tell you something men really don't get: flowers.Men don't understand flowers. No, I take that back. Men don't understand what women see in flowers. Men can't fathom why flowers are such a big deal to women, why women get so worked up about flowers.A woman receives a bouquet of flowers and she sees something grand. She sees beauty in its most basic form. She sees reaffirmation, a sign that she's special, a thoughtful gesture from the heart.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 14, 2007
Another civic crisis averted in Columbia: Starting next year, the poinsettia tree will be back at the mall. A couple hundred fans of the two-story holiday display made good on (polite) threats reported in my Sunday column and marched, poinsettias in hand, on The Mall in Columbia. Yesterday, General Growth Properties issued this statement: "After witnessing the show of support for the tree from the Columbia community, GGP has decided to bring the holiday symbol back to the center." Yes, that General Growth Properties, "the second largest U.S.-based publicly traded real estate investment trust based upon market capitalization," according to the small type on the bottom of the news release announcing that the company had caved.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | June 23, 1991
Please don't eat the common daisies. But do try the English daisy and the violets and the nasturtiums and all the other edible flowers that decorate your garden. The fiery, sweet or herbal flavors of flowers add panache to any dish they grace. And flowers can command center stage, too.A friend once taught me to prepare the flowers of wild elderberry bushes the way people do in the Rhine River Valley of her native Germany.Pick each flower cluster -- they look like Queen Anne's lace -- along with a little piece of stem and dip it in a wine-thinned crepe batter.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | July 24, 1991
Because of an editing error, information on identifying edible flowers was inadvertently omitted from an article in Wednesday's A La Carte.Susan Belsinger, author of "Flowers in the Kitchen," says consumers should avoid eating cut flowers that have been purchased from a florist or a garden center because the flowers probably have been recently sprayed with pesticides. Herbs or flower plants bought at a garden center are probably safe to use after about a month in your garden, she adds, because the pesticides will have broken down.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | February 26, 1995
The official start of spring is still weeks away, and several pages of the calendar may need to be turned before it's time to dig into another season of planting.But winter-weary gardeners need look no further for buds and blossoms than March 5, when the venerated Philadelphia Flower Show opens its doors for an eight-day run.Touted as one of the oldest, largest and most prestigious indoor shows in the world, the Philadelphia show has been a traditional rite of spring since 1829. Expert nursery growers will transform 6 acres within the Philadelphia Civic Center into lavish displays -- some costing as much as $100,000 to create -- that reflect the latest in gardening designs and materials.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2009
On a frigid winter's day inside his suburban Maryland home, Jim Duke is sipping a cup of hot tea made from nature's bounty. If it were a balmy winter or early spring day, he would pick rosemary and lavender from his garden to make the pale brew. Instead, he steeps some of their dried leaves, then adds a whole flower that resembles an inverted daffodil. The tea preparation isn't just about chasing winter's chill. A month shy of his 80th birthday, Duke believes the herbs and flowers in his homemade tea are good for his memory and overall health.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 14, 2007
Another civic crisis averted in Columbia: Starting next year, the poinsettia tree will be back at the mall. A couple hundred fans of the two-story holiday display made good on (polite) threats reported in my Sunday column and marched, poinsettias in hand, on The Mall in Columbia. Yesterday, General Growth Properties issued this statement: "After witnessing the show of support for the tree from the Columbia community, GGP has decided to bring the holiday symbol back to the center." Yes, that General Growth Properties, "the second largest U.S.-based publicly traded real estate investment trust based upon market capitalization," according to the small type on the bottom of the news release announcing that the company had caved.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
A new heroine is blossoming in Annapolis. She's feminine, she's floral - and she's unforgiving about litter. Meet Lacey Anne Regina, the Queen Anne's Lace leader of a new squad of cartoon characters that could soon adorn many of the state capital's trash cans in an effort to keep streets litter-free. The campaign is the latest flower-oriented initiative of Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, who has been known to pluck weeds on her strolls around town and drive around for weeks with boxes of daffodil bulbs in her car. One of Moyer's first acts as mayor was to replace the city's Lady Justice seal with its rose and thistle flag on City Hall letterhead.
NEWS
November 12, 2000
SUPERPLANTS that eat heavy metals, suck up oil and devour toxic chemicals. It's not science fiction; it's "phytoremediation," a promising new way to clean up polluted soil and water. Hundreds of poplar trees planted at Aberdeen Proving Ground a few years ago are effectively absorbing toxic solvents from an underground plume of an old munitions-burning pit. Silver maples were also planted at the Army facility in Harford County to help remove the pollutants from groundwater. Pumping and treating the plume would cost more because the subterranean stream is moving so slowly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 16, 1999
Nothing is less real than realism," Georgia O'Keeffe once said. "Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis that we get at the real meaning of things."
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