Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlower Buds
IN THE NEWS

Flower Buds

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By DENNIS BISHOP and DENNIS BISHOP,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2001
Q. I generally plant my annual flowers in early May, but I was very busy this spring and have not had an opportunity to plant them. Is it too late to plant annual flowers? What can I do to ensure that they thrive? A. With some extra care, you can still grow some nice annuals to add color to your late summer and early fall garden. Annuals grow best when they are able to establish roots before the stress of the hot summer months. When planted late, they miss this opportunity and need to be nursed along.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Hannah Moulden, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Washington fallFRINGE If you're into experimental performance and supporting a good cause, check out fallFRINGE, sponsored by Capital Fringe, a nonprofit whose mission is to promote the arts in D.C. fallFRINGE gathers the best performers from past Capital Fringe Festivals and brings them together for a week-long event of performing arts. The array of performers at fallFRINGE includes the Victorian Lyric Opera Company, Sheldon Scott and Michael Merino as they perform comedy, puppetry, drama and more.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
Even if you've never planted anything, even if you've mangled marigolds or killed cactus -- you can succeed with paperwhite narcissus bulbs. Nothing will offer a quicker lesson in the pleasure of gardening.Even seasoned gardeners enjoy growing paperwhites for decorations and Christmas presents. Unlike bulbs such as tulips and daffodils, paperwhites grow fast and don't require a long stretch of cool storage. Once planted, the paperwhite bulbs begin to sprout roots, then send up leaves and flower buds, all in 30 days or so.Shallow bowls, plain and inexpensive, serve as homes for paperwhites grown in gravel and without soil.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
It is a tragedy of botanical proportions. A giant agave basks in the warmth of Baltimore's Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, its spike of flower buds shooting through the roof and toward the sky. The cactus, a resident of the conservatory for decades, is known as the Century Plant for its long life. But a recent frost claimed its yellow petals before they could open, and now the agave will die without doing what it does just once during its time here on earth: bloom . "I called the director of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden," said Kate Blom, the conservatory greenhouse manager.
NEWS
By NANCY O'DONNELL and NANCY O'DONNELL,ALBANY TIMES UNION | May 14, 2006
The magnolia has long been declared by both horticulturists and homeowners to be one of the, if not the, most elegant flowering tree for the spring landscape. And with the show they put on this year, it's hard to disagree. With this past winter being such a mild one, it's been a bumper year for blossoms on this magnificent family of trees. One of the showiest magnolias is the saucer magnolia, also known as Magnolia x soulangiana. This is the tree with the huge purplish-pink blossoms that resemble tea cups in both size (the petals can extend outward 8 to 12-inches)
FEATURES
By Margaret Roach and Margaret Roach,Newsday Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 4, 1993
They are meant to bring joy, but the responsibility of providing aftercare for holiday plants can transform them into burdens instead.Even the luxury of fresh flowers can turn sour on a recipient, who may feel particularly black-thumbed when the heads of roses droop before the flowers open, or a $50 arrangement looks as limp as last week's salad before the big day is out.With the holiday season here, the do's and don'ts of caring for cut flowers and flowering...
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 29, 1992
Spring may be closer than you think. And it will seem even sooner if you force stems snipped from garden shrubs into bloom or buy pots of daffodils, tulips and other flowers at floral shops or supermarkets.Stems of many shrubs are easily coaxed to flower indoors when spring-like conditions -- warmth and moisture -- are provided to break their dormancy.Plump flower and leaf buds already have formed on most shrubs. Stems easiest and quickest to flower are those taken from forsythia, quince, pussy willow, spicebush, flowering almond, saucer magnolia, spirea, honeysuckle and cornelian cherry.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
It is a tragedy of botanical proportions. A giant agave basks in the warmth of Baltimore's Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, its spike of flower buds shooting through the roof and toward the sky. The cactus, a resident of the conservatory for decades, is known as the Century Plant for its long life. But a recent frost claimed its yellow petals before they could open, and now the agave will die without doing what it does just once during its time here on earth: bloom . "I called the director of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden," said Kate Blom, the conservatory greenhouse manager.
NEWS
By JOE BONWICH and JOE BONWICH,ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | August 16, 2006
Edible flowers are a simple way of making a striking, memorable presentation on the plate. Packages of edible flowers are available in the fresh-herb section of many supermarkets, but if you know what you're looking for and follow safety guidelines, you can find a lovely garnish in your own garden. "I especially like pansies," says Cindy Corley-Crapsey, who gives presentations on edible flowers as part of the St. Louis Master Gardeners, a joint program of the University of Missouri Extension and the Missouri Botanical Garden.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1997
Although early February is usually a time of storms in the Baltimore area, there are a few mild days when the gardener may be lured out to make the rounds of his or her property.During these rambles, it is not too early to take a pair of secateurs, or pruning shears, in hand and begin pruning fruit and flowering trees, ornamental bushes and the like.This will not only get you off to a good start in the spring -- for even winter has a way of slipping away quickly in spite of snow, ice and cabin fever -- but also give you a chance to bring a little bit of spring color into the house as you go about your trimming.
NEWS
By JOE BONWICH and JOE BONWICH,ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | August 16, 2006
Edible flowers are a simple way of making a striking, memorable presentation on the plate. Packages of edible flowers are available in the fresh-herb section of many supermarkets, but if you know what you're looking for and follow safety guidelines, you can find a lovely garnish in your own garden. "I especially like pansies," says Cindy Corley-Crapsey, who gives presentations on edible flowers as part of the St. Louis Master Gardeners, a joint program of the University of Missouri Extension and the Missouri Botanical Garden.
NEWS
By NANCY O'DONNELL and NANCY O'DONNELL,ALBANY TIMES UNION | May 14, 2006
The magnolia has long been declared by both horticulturists and homeowners to be one of the, if not the, most elegant flowering tree for the spring landscape. And with the show they put on this year, it's hard to disagree. With this past winter being such a mild one, it's been a bumper year for blossoms on this magnificent family of trees. One of the showiest magnolias is the saucer magnolia, also known as Magnolia x soulangiana. This is the tree with the huge purplish-pink blossoms that resemble tea cups in both size (the petals can extend outward 8 to 12-inches)
NEWS
By DENNIS BISHOP and DENNIS BISHOP,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2001
Q. I generally plant my annual flowers in early May, but I was very busy this spring and have not had an opportunity to plant them. Is it too late to plant annual flowers? What can I do to ensure that they thrive? A. With some extra care, you can still grow some nice annuals to add color to your late summer and early fall garden. Annuals grow best when they are able to establish roots before the stress of the hot summer months. When planted late, they miss this opportunity and need to be nursed along.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
Even if you've never planted anything, even if you've mangled marigolds or killed cactus -- you can succeed with paperwhite narcissus bulbs. Nothing will offer a quicker lesson in the pleasure of gardening.Even seasoned gardeners enjoy growing paperwhites for decorations and Christmas presents. Unlike bulbs such as tulips and daffodils, paperwhites grow fast and don't require a long stretch of cool storage. Once planted, the paperwhite bulbs begin to sprout roots, then send up leaves and flower buds, all in 30 days or so.Shallow bowls, plain and inexpensive, serve as homes for paperwhites grown in gravel and without soil.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1997
Although early February is usually a time of storms in the Baltimore area, there are a few mild days when the gardener may be lured out to make the rounds of his or her property.During these rambles, it is not too early to take a pair of secateurs, or pruning shears, in hand and begin pruning fruit and flowering trees, ornamental bushes and the like.This will not only get you off to a good start in the spring -- for even winter has a way of slipping away quickly in spite of snow, ice and cabin fever -- but also give you a chance to bring a little bit of spring color into the house as you go about your trimming.
FEATURES
By Margaret Roach and Margaret Roach,Newsday Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 4, 1993
They are meant to bring joy, but the responsibility of providing aftercare for holiday plants can transform them into burdens instead.Even the luxury of fresh flowers can turn sour on a recipient, who may feel particularly black-thumbed when the heads of roses droop before the flowers open, or a $50 arrangement looks as limp as last week's salad before the big day is out.With the holiday season here, the do's and don'ts of caring for cut flowers and flowering...
TRAVEL
By Hannah Moulden, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Washington fallFRINGE If you're into experimental performance and supporting a good cause, check out fallFRINGE, sponsored by Capital Fringe, a nonprofit whose mission is to promote the arts in D.C. fallFRINGE gathers the best performers from past Capital Fringe Festivals and brings them together for a week-long event of performing arts. The array of performers at fallFRINGE includes the Victorian Lyric Opera Company, Sheldon Scott and Michael Merino as they perform comedy, puppetry, drama and more.
FEATURES
June 28, 1998
Q.I've always had good luck with my blueberry plants, but early this spring some of the new shoots wilted and turned brown. Now I'm noticing that the berries are shriveling up and dropping before they've had a chance to ripen. What could be the problem?A.You're describing the classic symptoms of mummy berry, a common fungal disease that affects blueberry foliage and fruit. Next year's crop will also be infected unless you pick all of the shriveled fruits off the plants and off the ground and dispose of them.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 29, 1992
Spring may be closer than you think. And it will seem even sooner if you force stems snipped from garden shrubs into bloom or buy pots of daffodils, tulips and other flowers at floral shops or supermarkets.Stems of many shrubs are easily coaxed to flower indoors when spring-like conditions -- warmth and moisture -- are provided to break their dormancy.Plump flower and leaf buds already have formed on most shrubs. Stems easiest and quickest to flower are those taken from forsythia, quince, pussy willow, spicebush, flowering almond, saucer magnolia, spirea, honeysuckle and cornelian cherry.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.