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By Dave Gilmore | June 22, 2012
"Flow" iOS Free/$.99 ad-free version Big Duck Games Rating: 4 out of 4 When you first open "Flow," you are not treated to the typical one- or two-screen tutorial that seems to be standard with iOS games. Instead, it's a bit like the film "Inception. " You see a field of 25 squares and eight colored dots. You can almost hear Leo DiCaprio asking you to draw him a maze in one minute that takes two minutes to solve. "Flow" challenges the visual and problem solving side of the brain in a way that is intruiging but beautifully simple.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
"I don't know, sister, what I'm saying, nor do no man, if he don't be praying. I know that love is the only answer and the tight-rope lover the only dancer. … - From the poem " Some Days (for Paula)" by James Baldwin The tightrope lover was 40 years old in 1983 when Baldwin published a book containing this prescient verse. The author hoped that "Some Days" would help his younger sister steady her nerves and find her footing as she inched along the thin path to safety.
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NEWS
By SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
THE GREAT blackout of 2003 last month has pushed lawmakers and the Bush administration to fast-track needed legislation to ensure that electricity consistently flows to U.S. consumers. And a good thing, too. Because while widespread outages caused by disasters such as Hurricane Isabel may not be preventable, every effort must be made to ensure that the infrastructure can handle the nation's ever-increasing daily grind. In the two versions of the mammoth energy bill now before Congress, much that relates to improving the electrical grid is worthy, but one of the details is not. On the good side: Giving the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission real power to enforce reliability standards across the grid is necessary.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Are Howard County's speed limits too low or too high? That's one question some county officials hoped to answer when they reviewed a report of speed camera data from their vendor, Xerox State & Local Solutions. Traffic engineers have attempted for decades to set reasonable speed limits by analyzing traffic flow, setting the limit at the 85th percentile speed of vehicles on the road - meaning 15 percent of drivers travel faster than the limit. The thinking goes that drivers set a natural limit based on perceived risk.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it earned $3.05 million, or 10 cents a share, during the second quarter, a performance an analyst said was on target considering that savings from recent acquisitions have not yet taken effect.The Baltimore-based owner or operator of 28 television stations, including Channel 45 -- the Fox affiliate in Baltimore -- and 34 radio stations saw its profit margins shrink considerably since the second quarter of last year, and most of its 37 percent gain in cash flow came from the sheer increase in size of the acquisition-minded firm since last year.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. reported gains in its third quarter yesterday, with broadcast cash flow - a crucial industry yardstick - increasing 4 percent to $79.5 million and net broadcast revenue going up 8.1 percent to $174 million. The company had net income of $18.85 million, or 18 cents per diluted share for the quarter that ended Sept. 30, compared with a loss of $11.34 million, or 14 cents a share, in the third quarter of 1999. After-tax cash flow per share went up 41.4 percent to 41 cents.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2002
An overflow at a pumping station caused millions of gallons of raw sewage to pour into Gunpowder Falls yesterday, prompting health warnings for the waterway from Perry Hall to the Bird River as county public works crews worked to stop the flow and determine the cause. County public works officials were alerted to the overflow at the Gunpowder pumping station in the 9300 block of Dundawan Road in Perry Hall about 2:30 p.m. By 10 p.m., more than 2 million gallons of sewage had flowed into Gunpowder Falls, according to Ellen Kobler, a county spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2002
Adelphia Communications overstated both the number of its cable subscribers and its cash flow for 2001, people close to the company said yesterday. The number of cable subscribers has been overstated by at least 4.3 percent and perhaps as much as 10 percent, these people said, although the exact figure is still being determined. The company inflated its estimated $1.55 billion in 2001 cash flow by tens of millions of dollars and possibly by more, they said. The company also overstated its estimated 2001 cash flow - or earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization - by tens of millions through a complex swap transaction on the purchase of digital set-top boxes from Motorola Inc. and Scientific Atlanta Inc., these people said.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH AND LARRY CARSON and LAURA MCCANDLISH AND LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTERS | March 24, 2006
State engineers call it an innovative design that could save money and speed the flow of traffic along busy intersections. But Sherri Bennett, an auto parts store clerk who drives the "continuous-flow" intersection built in 2000 in Prince George's County, isn't so enthusiastic. "It's terrible. It's just very weird," Bennett said of the oddly shaped intersection of Routes 228 and 210, one of only two places in the country making use of the design. "I would not recommend it," she said.
BUSINESS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 3, 1996
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. yesterday reported that operating cash flow -- a key measure for the broadcast industry -- increased 15.2 percent to $21.5 million in the first quarter.The fast-growing Baltimore chain of independent TV stations said the gain came on an 11.9 percent jump in revenues, to $47.8 million from $42.7 million in the same period last year.For the period ended March 31, the company reported a loss of $458,000, or 1 cent per share, compared with a loss of $2.5 million, or 9 cents per share, in the same period a year ago.Sinclair agreed last month to acquire St. Louis-based River City Broadcasting L. P. in a $1.2 billion deal that will make it the nation's seventh-largest TV broadcast group.
FEATURES
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
For more than two weeks, 43,000 gallons of sewage spilled into the Gwynns Falls stream through a broken sewer line. Baltimore public works officials said Wednesday they had stopped the sewage's flow, which was reported on July 13 and fixed on July 28. During that time, two gallons of sewage spilled every minute into the scenic waterway as it passes through Carroll Park, officials said. The city is currently using a temporary pipe to fix the problem in the 2100 block of Washington Boulevard, while a contractor works on a permanent repair.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The State Highway Administration will spend nearly $15 million in the next six years to expand overnight patrols and increase the number of traffic cameras operating along major highways across the state. The changes will enable quicker assistance to drivers who become stranded or are involved in accidents, decreasing the impact on traffic, SHA Administrator Melinda Peters said Tuesday. "What we found is, if we can clear an overnight incident prior to rush hour, it makes a huge difference for people commuting," Peters said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Whenever Baltimore-area companies sell themselves to out-of-state firms, economists and local leaders alike bemoan the loss. Another headquarters gone. Fewer corporate decision-makers here. Possible job cuts. But Silicon Valley's deals for two Columbia firms - the planned Micros Systems acquisition, announced last week, and Sourcefire last year - strike local entrepreneurs in an entirely different way. They want more California tech giants doing business here, more billion-dollar-plus acquisitions.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Tucked amid the woods of northern Baltimore County is one of Maryland's natural gems - the Big Gunpowder Falls, a nationally renowned trout stream that draws anglers from far and wide to try their skills and luck in the cold, rushing water. But some fishermen and fishing guides say they're having a harder time getting at this prized outdoor resource - though it's publicly accessible in Gunpowder Falls State Park - because of unusually heavy river flows that make it hard to fish or even stand at times in the water.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
The robotic fish kept alone in a tank at the University of Maryland, College Park doesn't dazzle with its agility or speed, but it does promise bigger things to come. At the flick of a switch, water flows through the tank. The faceless gray plastic creature less than a foot long knows this, and you know that it knows this because it slides languidly from side to side to shelter behind a white plastic pipe, minimizing its energy use. The robot cannot see the pipe, but it can feel it. It may not look like much, but this is progress for associate professor Derek A. Paley, his College Park research team and partners at Bowling Green State and Michigan State universities, who have been working on the hardware, mathematical calculations and computer program for a couple of years.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 28, 2013
Workers stopped a leak in an old sewage main in southwest Baltimore Saturday, more than 18 hours after a rupture in the eight-inch pipe caused raw sewage to spew into the Gwynns Falls at a rate of 50 gallons per minute, according to the city's Department of Public Works. The break in the terra cotta main, in a wooded section of Leakin and Gwynns Falls park, was identified at noon on Friday, but crews did not begin working on the problem until daylight Saturday. The leak was difficult to reach because of large, downed trees, a department spokesman said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. reported yesterday that its broadcast cash flow and total revenue -- two significant benchmarks of financial strength in the broadcasting industry -- were down in the company's fourth quarter. However, Sinclair did reverse the quarterly and yearly losses that troubled 1998's balance sheet. "This is quite simply the best balance sheet Sinclair has had in a long time," said Patrick J. Talamantes, the company's chief financial officer. In the fourth quarter, the company enjoyed a net gain of $179.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 18, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Like so many beavers, earlier Pennsylvanians rarely passed up a chance to throw a dam across any river, creek or stream they happened across. But now that zeal is running in the other direction, as the state and private partners have been removing more dams every year - restoring stream flow, improving conditions for prized sport fish and eliminating potential killers. "Pennsylvania is leading the nation in the effort to remove dams," said Eric Eckl, spokesman for American Rivers, a private Washington-based nonprofit group that is a partner with the state Fish and Boat Commission and Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman has scheduled a series of public meetings on the implementation of a stormwater fee, while at the same time the County Council is considering an amendment to the fee that would essentially exempt all nonprofit organizations. Neuman said last week that her office continues to get phone calls and emails from property owners with questions about the fees, which were imposed based on a state mandate. The county's first fees were included in the most recent round of property tax bills.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
In 1982, Mayor William Donald Schaefer persuaded state lawmakers to try a different approach to urban revitalization. To lure companies to poorer parts of Baltimore and elsewhere in Maryland, the government would dangle a 10-year property tax discount and hiring rebates. Baltimore's first so-called Enterprise Zone was carved from a depressed section of Lower Park Heights called Park Circle, where a sausage plant and other businesses opened their doors. Thirty years later, Baltimore has greatly expanded its program, offering multimillion-dollar tax breaks to developers in many of the city's most desirable neighborhoods.
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