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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 28, 2008
Consider this dish a Southwestern spin on a sloppy Joe. It's just as easy to make, especially if you buy commercially prepared salsa, refried beans and, of course, the soft flour tortillas. Use the Mexican variety of hot chorizo, which must be cooked. To crumble the sausage, cut down the casing with a sharp knife and use your fingers to pull out the meat. You can find chorizo at supermarkets and ethnic-food stores. Ground turkey or ground chicken are lower-fat alternatives to the ground beef.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 6, 2012
Sedona, Ariz., is one of Chandler Tschand's favorite places in the world. He's been there dozens of times, so it's no coincidence that he and his wife,  Asha (the official owner), named their year-old Woodstock restaurant Sedona Grill. Nor is it a coincidence that Southwestern fare is the culinary theme here. This cuisine favors a kinder, gentler approach than the spicier Tex-Mex (and Mexican) styles of Arizona's neighbors. It is generally less heated with well-balanced background flavors.
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FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | July 29, 1998
Item: Taco Bell Home Originals dinner kitsWhat you get: 5 to 6 servingsCost: About $4Preparation time: 10 to 12 minutes in the microwave, 20 to 22 minutes conventional ovenReview: Though I'm not sure everyone wants to duplicate the fast-food taste of Taco Bell at home, these dinner kits earn high marks for convenience. We tried the Soft Taco Dinner and the Ultimate Bean Burrito kit. All of the nonperishable ingredients -- including flour tortillas and, in the case of the burrito kit, refried beans, cheese sauce and salsa -- came in the kit. This is not authentic Mexican food with real heat, but it's still satisfying.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 28, 2008
Consider this dish a Southwestern spin on a sloppy Joe. It's just as easy to make, especially if you buy commercially prepared salsa, refried beans and, of course, the soft flour tortillas. Use the Mexican variety of hot chorizo, which must be cooked. To crumble the sausage, cut down the casing with a sharp knife and use your fingers to pull out the meat. You can find chorizo at supermarkets and ethnic-food stores. Ground turkey or ground chicken are lower-fat alternatives to the ground beef.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,Orange County Register | April 24, 1991
Here are some pointers when working with tortillas:Fat: The type of shortening used to make tortillas can be a source of concern. Lard, of course, is the age-old staple but its cholesterol content and high percentage of saturated fat pose obvious problems. Versions made with "pure vegetable shortening" still conceal saturated fat. If you're really concerned, shop for brands including "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil," just plain vegetable oil. But the latter tend to be thicker and heavier.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | March 12, 2008
Quesadillas can be as fancy as you want them to be, but the simplest are often the best. For me, nothing beats two toasted flour tortillas sandwiching a filling of melted cheese and a little bowl of salsa on the side for occasional dipping. Mild asadero, a Mexican cow's milk cheese, is a great melter and would make for a good filling. If you want more of a flavor zap, consider a fine Wisconsin cheddar or even a French mimolette. You also can microwave the quesadillas: Cook on high until the cheese melts.
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | November 26, 2006
Using the loosest definition of a burrito - a flour tortilla wrapped around a filling - only your imagination limits what goes inside. This burrito, for example, makes a fine dish to start the morning. EGG AND SMOKED-SALMON BRUNCH BURRITOS Serves 4 2 (10-inch) flour tortillas 4 large eggs, lightly beaten 2 tablespoons water 1/4 cup whipped tub-style cream cheese 2 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon 1/4 cup chopped scallions Heat the tortillas according to package directions and keep them in a stack covered with a damp cloth or paper towel.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1992
The American obsession with south-of-the-border flavors is booming and here to stay. There isn't a more effective way to gather enthusiastic eaters than with the familiar taco in an impressive, updated version. The baked flour tortillas are much lower in calories than the fried corn tortilla shells and to lower calories even more, use a light cheese and sour cream.The directions call for baking the taco stack in the oven but if you are microwave friendly, the tortillas can be warmed in the microwave by placing on a plate and covering with microwave wrap.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 1997
What's the second thing you think of when you think of Memphis (the first, of course, being Elvis)? It's a tough one, right? In your mind, "blues" and "barbecue" are in a photo finish. ++ At Red Hot & Blue, they go hand in hand, with a little Elvis thrown in for good measure.Starting in 1988 with only one location -- in Arlington, Va. -- Red Hot & Blue may well be the fastest-growing barbecue chain in the country. There are more than 25 outposts now, with plans in the works for another 100. Maryland has one in Annapolis, Gaithersburg, Laurel and the one we recently visited in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2003
It doesn't produce the spiciest Mexican food you'll find in Baltimore or the most inventive. But, El Salto Restaurant of Brooklyn Park turns out good, solid dishes that were easy on the wallet and left me quite satisfied. Situated on a well-traveled stretch of Ritchie Highway, El Salto occupies a former fast-food restaurant. Inside, the decor includes the requisite sombrero and oversized Mexican beer bottles, as well as a nifty painting of a primitive desert scene, complete with a hawk grabbing a snake.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | March 12, 2008
Quesadillas can be as fancy as you want them to be, but the simplest are often the best. For me, nothing beats two toasted flour tortillas sandwiching a filling of melted cheese and a little bowl of salsa on the side for occasional dipping. Mild asadero, a Mexican cow's milk cheese, is a great melter and would make for a good filling. If you want more of a flavor zap, consider a fine Wisconsin cheddar or even a French mimolette. You also can microwave the quesadillas: Cook on high until the cheese melts.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 26, 2007
Kitchen Playdates By Lauren Bank Deen The Everything Kids' Gross Cookbook By Colleen Sell and Melinda Sell Frank Adams Media / 2007 / $7.95 How do you get kids to not only eat their veggies, but cook them, too? A side order of yuck. Appealing to the preteen who loves to get grossed out, this books sells a casserole of creamed corn and frozen mixed vegetables by calling it Puke au Gratin. Buttered spinach linguine becomes Gangrenous Intestines. As a grown-up, I'm too disgusted to read much more.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 15, 2007
BLTs, one of America's favorite sandwiches, have always been a passion for me and my family, and over the years I have experimented with various versions of this classic combination. Not so long ago, I had another brainstorm -- the BLT quesadilla! I spread large flour tortillas with creamy goat cheese mixed with some ground cumin, then the classic trinity followed -- sliced tomatoes drizzled with a little balsamic vinegar, bits of bacon and, finally, some baby spinach leaves. After the tortillas were folded in half, they were quickly grilled on a stovetop grill pan. (A skillet will work if you don't own a grill pan.)
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | November 26, 2006
Using the loosest definition of a burrito - a flour tortilla wrapped around a filling - only your imagination limits what goes inside. This burrito, for example, makes a fine dish to start the morning. EGG AND SMOKED-SALMON BRUNCH BURRITOS Serves 4 2 (10-inch) flour tortillas 4 large eggs, lightly beaten 2 tablespoons water 1/4 cup whipped tub-style cream cheese 2 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon 1/4 cup chopped scallions Heat the tortillas according to package directions and keep them in a stack covered with a damp cloth or paper towel.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA | August 23, 2006
Rubs can rub a lazy cook the right way. There usually are ample ingredients in the pantry (after all, how much ground red pepper or cumin can a person go through in a decade?) and they add plenty of zip to meat and seafood. Here we're adding a rub to quick-cooking steak kebabs. You can tailor the rub to accommodate your heat quotient; use less of the chili and ground red pepper (or none at all) if you prefer a tamer kebab. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 26, 2005
When I lived in San Francisco, I often escaped the city and drove north across the Golden Gate Bridge to the desolate land known as Point Reyes, Calif. A fin-shaped peninsula jutting miles out into the sea, Point Reyes offered empty beaches and a charming lighthouse set high on the rocks with dramatic cliff-top views of the Pacific Ocean. I would stop at a village store and pick up a sandwich made with sliced avocado, strips of artisan-smoked bacon and cold, cooked shrimp. It made for great munching while scanning the horizon for a stray gray whale or two. The buttery avocado paired naturally with the smoky bacon and shrimp.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | January 15, 1991
Nutritional breakdownMakes 4 servings. Each serving has:* Calories: 361* Protein: 31 grams* Carbohydrates: 42 grams* Fat: 8 grams* Saturated fat: 1 gram* Cholesterol: 56 milligrams* Sodium: 381 milligramsShopping list3 boneless and skinless chicken breast halves4 flour tortillas1 jalapeno pepper1 15-ounce can black beans1 large ripe tomato1 small bunch cilantro1 medium red onionFresh lime juice1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurtPantry: cayenne pepper, clove garlic,...
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA | August 23, 2006
Rubs can rub a lazy cook the right way. There usually are ample ingredients in the pantry (after all, how much ground red pepper or cumin can a person go through in a decade?) and they add plenty of zip to meat and seafood. Here we're adding a rub to quick-cooking steak kebabs. You can tailor the rub to accommodate your heat quotient; use less of the chili and ground red pepper (or none at all) if you prefer a tamer kebab. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
BUSINESS
By Barry Shlachter and Barry Shlachter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 14, 2003
Watch out, Wonder Bread. Sales of the unassuming but versatile tortilla are catching up to white bread, reflecting the growth of the nation's Hispanic population and the broadening of the American palate. "Tortillas have had steady growth 10 to 15 percent a year seemingly forever," said Irwin Steinberg, founding president of the 14-year-old Dallas-based Tortilla Industry Association. The popularity of wraps -- renamed flour tortillas that are sometimes flavored -- also helped boost the round, flat bread's share to 32 percent of the combined retail and food service market for bread, just behind white loaves at 34 percent, says a report from market researcher Mintel for the association.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2003
It doesn't produce the spiciest Mexican food you'll find in Baltimore or the most inventive. But, El Salto Restaurant of Brooklyn Park turns out good, solid dishes that were easy on the wallet and left me quite satisfied. Situated on a well-traveled stretch of Ritchie Highway, El Salto occupies a former fast-food restaurant. Inside, the decor includes the requisite sombrero and oversized Mexican beer bottles, as well as a nifty painting of a primitive desert scene, complete with a hawk grabbing a snake.
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