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NEWS
June 18, 2012
The Sun's wording in "Report criticizes Netanyahu's handling of Gaza flotilla raid" (June 14) obscures elements influencing Israel's actions criticized by the Israeli state comptroller. While the article recognizes that the flotilla was "determined to breach Israel's blockade of Gaza," it does not say that flotilla leaders could have transferred any humanitarian aid to Israel for inspection and delivery to Gaza. Instead, the "aid flotilla," whose lead ship apparently carried no aid, tried to run an internationally recognized weapons blockade.
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NEWS
June 18, 2012
The Sun's wording in "Report criticizes Netanyahu's handling of Gaza flotilla raid" (June 14) obscures elements influencing Israel's actions criticized by the Israeli state comptroller. While the article recognizes that the flotilla was "determined to breach Israel's blockade of Gaza," it does not say that flotilla leaders could have transferred any humanitarian aid to Israel for inspection and delivery to Gaza. Instead, the "aid flotilla," whose lead ship apparently carried no aid, tried to run an internationally recognized weapons blockade.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
Boating safety and environmental safeguards were oft-repeated topics at yesterday's 59th Changing of the Guard for Flotilla 17, among the first Coast Guard auxiliary units in Baltimore.The traditional ceremony included honoring members of the previous watch under Cmdr. David Clauss, swearing in new officers and presenting awards for 1997.Improving public education and recruiting will be the top goals for Maury Garfield and Jim Poorman, newly elected commander and vice commander of Flotilla 17, a volunteer organization whose members work with the Coast Guard to update waterway charts, perform search and rescue missions and vessel inspections, teach boating and navigation courses and help with special water-based events.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
It took 200 years, but the oft-forgotten War of 1812 got some attention Wednesday. A flotilla of more than 40 ships representing a dozen nations glided under the Key Bridge and into Baltimore Harbor to launch the commemoration of the conflict that gave the United States its anthem and expelled the British military from American soil once and for all. With the arrival of tall ships and warships at the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and North Locust Point,...
NEWS
By KAREN MASTERSON and KAREN MASTERSON,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1997
Marine archaeologists have been trying without success for 20 years to find a War of 1812 flotilla that contributed to the American victory in the Battle of Baltimore. Now they think they know why they've failed: They've been looking in the wrong place.Don Shomette, who has been leading the effort to find the boats in the Patuxent River, plans today to tell a University of Baltimore symposium on the War of 1812 that the river has changed direction dramatically in the past 175 years, putting the flotilla not under water but under land.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 1996
MIAMI -- Using virtually the same language, U.S. and Cuban officials are fretting that the Freedom Flotilla set to cross the Florida Straits today could ultimately lead to a risky confrontation.Havana is reported to have put security forces and Communist Party members on alert against "sabotage" this weekend, and Washington has warned flotilla members that they will be arrested if they try to enter Cuban waters."Everybody is in a 'prevent mode,' " said an official in Washington. Strict orders issued to U.S. officials to avoid public comments on the flotilla underlined the depth of Washington's concerns, he added.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Archaeologists searching in the mud of St. Leonard's Creek in Calvert County have stumbled on what they believe are the remains of a gunboat scuttled and burned by American sailors during the War of 1812.If they're right, it is only the second time in 20 years that investigators have found part of the long-sought "lost flotilla" commanded by Commodore Joshua Barney.Barney ordered his boats destroyed to keep them out of British hands as the Redcoats advanced on Washington. Most were burned in the upper Patuxent in August 1814, but Susan M. Langley, Maryland's underwater archaeologist, said two were burned earlier in St. Leonard's Creek when they proved to be too slow.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Somewhere in the mud of the Patuxent River is the answer to a 186-year-old mystery, and Robert Reyes believes he has found a clue that could crack the case. So does William Clark. Reyes is a management analyst with the U.S. Postal Service. Clark manages the Calvert County Soil Conservation District. Both share a passion for the strange and baffling matter of the Barney Flotilla - a missing armada of about 17 American galleys and gunboats scuttled and burned near the end of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
America used to go to war in rowboats.This last happened in the War of 1812. The boats were called barges or galleys -- 75 or 50 feet long and rowed by men sitting two abreast. They shot cannonballs from the bow in frontal assaults and parting shots from the stern when escaping British man-of-wars.They often lost.But in hit-and-run warfare in the summer of 1814, Joshua Barney of Maryland and his men put up a valiant fight before sinking all 18 of their boats in the Patuxent River to avoid the fleet's capture.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
The Baltimore Sun mistakenly omits the goal of the so-called "humanitarian aid flotilla" when it identifies it as such, in its editorial of June 2, "A way forward for Israel." In fact, the flotilla's primary purpose was to provoke Israel. Something they succeeded in doing. The fact is, Israel supplies tons of humanitarian aid to Gaza and offered to transport any supplies the flotilla was carrying. Had the crew on board the Mavi Marmara been so concerned with getting them to Gaza, they would have abided by the international blockade, and Israel would have gladly transported the supplies after inspection.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
With cannon booms, a drum roll and the Navy at the ready, the state unveiled its plans Thursday to celebrate the bicentennial of the War of 1812, a series of events designed to showcase Maryland's role in the conflict. The Pride of Baltimore II, numerous Navy vessels, the Coast Guard's Eagle and at least 10 other tall ships, many from foreign shores, will berth at the Inner Harbor in June to launch the commemoration. Organizers expect about 1 million people to attend the weeklong event.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
The Baltimore Sun mistakenly omits the goal of the so-called "humanitarian aid flotilla" when it identifies it as such, in its editorial of June 2, "A way forward for Israel." In fact, the flotilla's primary purpose was to provoke Israel. Something they succeeded in doing. The fact is, Israel supplies tons of humanitarian aid to Gaza and offered to transport any supplies the flotilla was carrying. Had the crew on board the Mavi Marmara been so concerned with getting them to Gaza, they would have abided by the international blockade, and Israel would have gladly transported the supplies after inspection.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
A Maryland peace activist aboard the pro-Palestinian flotilla raided by Israeli commandos expressed guarded optimism Wednesday that the deadly episode would force Israel to relax its years-old blockade of the Gaza Strip. The Israeli government "may have made a gross mistake," Edward L. Peck, a retired U.S. diplomat who lives in Chevy Chase, said in a telephone interview. "And so, this could lead to an improved situation for the people" of Gaza. "It's a horrible thing that happened to those Turks who died" in the Israeli attack.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
While much remains unclear about the early-morning Israeli raid on a humanitarian aid flotilla bound for Gaza that left nine people dead, what is apparent is that some poor decisions were made — both by the pro-Palestinian activists who chose to defy the Israeli naval blockade and by those who sent the Israeli equivalent of the Navy SEALs rappelling down ropes from Black Hawk helicopters onto the ship's deck at 4 a.m. Monday's violence could prove...
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Somewhere in the mud of the Patuxent River is the answer to a 186-year-old mystery, and Robert Reyes believes he has found a clue that could crack the case. So does William Clark. Reyes is a management analyst with the U.S. Postal Service. Clark manages the Calvert County Soil Conservation District. Both share a passion for the strange and baffling matter of the Barney Flotilla - a missing armada of about 17 American galleys and gunboats scuttled and burned near the end of the War of 1812.
NEWS
June 21, 2000
THE 1976 CAVALCADE of tall ships from the Seven Seas gave such a psychological boost to Baltimore that their return today fills the city with anticipation. A million visitors are expected to crowd the Inner Harbor to glimpse the majestic reminders of a bygone era. The ships' visit 24 years ago is still vivid in the minds of many Baltimoreans and visitors, who got a sneak preview of coming attractions in downtown revival at the bicentennial event. The Inner Harbor, in particular, received rave reviews.
NEWS
February 20, 1992
If you missed one Coast Guard Auxiliary safe-boating course, don't worry. The Magothy River Flotilla is offering another one, beginning Monday, Feb. 24, at Magothy River Middle School on Peninsula Farm Roadin Arnold.The flotilla will conduct the 13 classes in seven weeks, with sessions running from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, through April 6.For a few hours each evening and a $15 fee to cover materials, you can learn about boat construction and nomenclature, rigging and handling, tying knots and plotting courses.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 26, 1993
HAVANA -- A half-dozen boats from Key West, Fla., weathered high seas to arrive at Marina Hemingway yesterday, carrying much-needed medical supplies for the Cuban people.The flotilla of private craft was smaller than expected. Some would-be participants backed out Saturday from the 90-mile journey because of conditions in the Florida Straits -- 40-mph winds and 20-foot swells.Although the United States has not allowed travel or trade with Cuba since Cuba's communist regime came to power more than 30 years ago, the flotilla was licensed for humanitarian reasons.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Archaeologists searching in the mud of St. Leonard's Creek in Calvert County have stumbled on what they believe are the remains of a gunboat scuttled and burned by American sailors during the War of 1812.If they're right, it is only the second time in 20 years that investigators have found part of the long-sought "lost flotilla" commanded by Commodore Joshua Barney.Barney ordered his boats destroyed to keep them out of British hands as the Redcoats advanced on Washington. Most were burned in the upper Patuxent in August 1814, but Susan M. Langley, Maryland's underwater archaeologist, said two were burned earlier in St. Leonard's Creek when they proved to be too slow.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
Boating safety and environmental safeguards were oft-repeated topics at yesterday's 59th Changing of the Guard for Flotilla 17, among the first Coast Guard auxiliary units in Baltimore.The traditional ceremony included honoring members of the previous watch under Cmdr. David Clauss, swearing in new officers and presenting awards for 1997.Improving public education and recruiting will be the top goals for Maury Garfield and Jim Poorman, newly elected commander and vice commander of Flotilla 17, a volunteer organization whose members work with the Coast Guard to update waterway charts, perform search and rescue missions and vessel inspections, teach boating and navigation courses and help with special water-based events.
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