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By Mona Charen | April 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - On a recent trip to the Florida Keys, my family and I witnessed two scenes that illustrate some of what is delightful and a bit of what is dismaying in modern America. Let's start with the bad news: We were staying at the most family-oriented resort imaginable, complete with a pirate ship pool and plenty of chicken nuggets on the menu. (This is not the bad part, I'm getting to that.) The air was scented by fragrant flowers (6-year-old Ben's favorite part was riding his bicycle under a canopy of blossoms)
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Update, 6:06 p.m.: Tropical Storm Andrea has formed about 300 miles west of Florida, with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. Tropical storm warnings have been issued for Florida's Gulf coast, with tropical storm watches from the Jacksonville, Fla., area to the Carolinas. The storm, whether or not it maintains its strength, could brush past the Delmarva peninsula late Friday with heavy rain and gusty winds, according to the National Hurricane Center. Original post, as of 2:53 p.m.: Hurricane forecasters are watching a system of thunderstorms and gale-force winds that is becoming increasingly organized and could soon form the season's first Atlantic tropical cyclone.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
The smell of vanilla mixed with coconut permeates A Touch of Nature, filling every corner of the natural food store with a scent reminiscent of pina coladas and tropical islands.Within the year, however, owner Peggy Taylor will trade the aromas for the real thing as she sells her business and retires to the Florida Keys."I started thinking about this when I bought a house in the Florida Keys about a year and a half ago," said Ms. Taylor, who has operated the shop since for 11 years. "The Keys are nothing like mainland Florida.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Krog and Kathleen Krog,McClatchy-Tribune | June 14, 2009
Category 5 - The 1935 Labor Day Hurricane Thomas Neil Knowles (Florida, $29.95) Rarely is a nonfiction book so compelling that it demands to be read in one sitting. But Thomas Neil Knowles' straightforward retelling of the 1935 hurricane that leveled Florida's Middle Keys is the exception. Knowles provides a sobering yet gripping account of the storm's ferocity, and at the same time personalizes its consequences by making us care about the people it affected. If you are a fan of the Keys, the author's descriptions of life there in the mid-1930s will add to your understanding of why it is such a unique place to so many people.
FEATURES
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1996
Peering over the edge of the Sandy II, I could see colorful fish and waving sea fans in the 20-foot waters off Big Pine Key, Fla. "You won't be sorry you decided to do your first open-water dive here," said Susan Steinkamp, the master scuba diver who was to certify me among the ranks of underwater adventurers.She was right. The clear, warm waters of the Florida Keys are a popular spot for experienced divers as well as novices like me. I went to the keys with my husband and three friends the third week of December just as the first snow was falling in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | February 15, 1998
I am hoping to go to the Florida Keys. I would like to relax and watch the famous sunsets for a week or so. I saw a portion of a television program telling the story of a man who built a railroad line through the keys. What I didn't hear is whether this rail line is still functional or is now nonexistent. I think they mentioned a book on this project. Could you please let me know the status of the rail line and the name of the book?If you go to the keys, you'll be riding some of the way on the bed of what was Henry Flagler's railroad.
TRAVEL
By Kathryn Straach and Kathryn Straach,Dallas Morning News | April 8, 2001
The Florida Keys -- U.S. 1 from Humphrey Bogart's Key Largo down to Ernest Hemingway's Key West -- is the laid-back land of sunset celebrations, conch and Key lime pie. Sea breezes from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean tickle palm trees and tanned skin. And deep blue water is never far from the horizon. Here, you'll find plenty of hammocks -- both hardwood and soft weave. The chain, consisting of about 800 islands, is more than an addendum to the state of Florida. It is a state of mind.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2001
BELLE GLADE, Fla. - Legend has it this is how the communities along the southern side of Lake Okeechobee became a great training ground for state champion football teams: Players got their speed chasing rabbits. In this farming community 40 miles due west of the ritzy island of Palm Beach, the sugar cane fields are ripe for harvesting between October and March. To ready the cane for picking, two sides of each field are set ablaze to clean out the dead leaves and foliage in the way. And that's when the rabbits run for their lives.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 31, 1991
KEY LOIS, Fla. -- The once-lush shoreline of this tiny island is an eerie tangle of dead, gnarled wood. The clear blue water is fouled a muddy brown. Well-fed monkeys roam along the barren beach, past a row of red mangrove trees.It is the trees, not the monkeys, that are in cages.For deep in the Florida Keys, monkey business has given way to munching mayhem.Here, on a key of 100 acres, more than 1,500 rhesus monkeys romp and scurry and swing and chase and scream. Under the tropical sun, they hang from branches, stroll down a boarded walkway, scout the waterfront, fight, play, dally and, perhaps most notably, dine.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
The annual Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee has ended in Washington, with a Texas eighth-grader winning $12,000 for spelling P-O-C-O-C-U-R-A-N-T-E. That's $1,091 per letter, but why wreck the mood with cheap math? The winner was Sai Gunturi, whose own name could one day decide a spelling bee. As 251 contestants this week spelled bacillary, cubitiere, exegetical and tessitura, two parents convened in T-I-M-O-N-I-U-M. Their agenda: an alternative spelling bee for their spelling-challenged but otherwise bright children, who no more can spell foraminate, contumelious or sphragistic than their parents can. The C-O-N-S-E-N-S-U-S was that many words are just too darn hard to spell and should be ignored forever.
SPORTS
By Josh Robbins and Josh Robbins,The Orlando Sentinel | June 11, 2009
ORLANDO, Fla. - -The Orlando Magic is riding high after its Game 3 NBA Finals victory Tuesday night at Amway Arena, but history remains against the team as it continues its series against the Los Angeles Lakers. Since the NBA moved to its current 2-3-2 NBA Finals format during the 1984-85 season, the team scheduled to host the middle three games - as the Magic is - has won the championship six of 24 times. Only two teams, the Detroit Pistons in 2004 and the Miami Heat in 2006, have swept the middle three games at home.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,RICHMOND, Va | August 29, 2007
Morgan State caught Jerrell Guyton on the rebound. Guyton wanted to play football for Texas Southern in Houston in 2004, but detoured to Morgan State and Baltimore after a chance meeting with Bears coach Donald Hill-Eley. From such quirks, college football legends are sometimes made. A native of Miami, Guyton effectively opened a pipeline to that football-rich area for Hill-Eley. When the Bears open their season tomorrow night at home against Savannah State, their roster will number 18 Floridians, the second most by state after Maryland's 24. "Florida has been major for us," Hill-Eley said.
TRAVEL
By Allen Holder and Allen Holder,Mcclatchy-Tribune | March 11, 2007
KEY WEST, FLA. // Only one road leads from Key Largo all the way to Key West, so you'll get wet before you get lost. For the directionally impaired, that makes things easier. Yet the 100 or so miles between Key Largo in the north and Key West on the southwestern end cover a lot of territory. The Keys comprise 1,700 islands, after all. Harry Truman visited 11 times between 1946 and 1952. Ernest Hemingway spent 11 years in Key West. I had two days to take it in. For the most part, U.S. 1 is two lanes -- sometimes highway, sometimes city street.
NEWS
By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
NAPLES, FLA. -- Hurricane Wilma pounded its way across Florida yesterday, killing at least six people and causing widespread flooding, power outages and property damage. The storm moved with fierce speed, making landfall on Florida's west coast about 6:30 a.m. at Cape Romano, a deserted area south of Marco Island. Within six hours, Wilma had traversed the width of the narrow state, moving out to sea near Palm Beach. Only the Florida Panhandle was spared as Wilma delivered wind gusts of 100 mph and more, shutting 19 airports across the state.
NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 10, 2004
KEY LARGO - Tourists and mobile-home residents began fleeing the Florida Keys yesterday as Hurricane Ivan, the third storm to threaten the state in a month, took aim at the fragile island chain and perhaps the mainland as well. The specter of a triple whammy worried Gov. Jeb Bush, who said that, beyond preparation, there was but one thing to do. "We can all pray," he said in Tallahassee. "And I intend to do some praying tonight that it redirects itself." After leaving the tiny spice island of Grenada in ruins, Ivan was on course to pound Jamaica today and pummel Cuba tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2004
The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900, which made landfall in Texas on Sept. 8, 1900, killed some 8,000 people and caused $30 million in damage. Even though the mega-storm remains the deadliest weather disaster in U.S. history, it was, incredibly, only a Category 4 hurricane. As Hurricane Frances threatens Florida, its power and force recall another Labor Day storm that slammed into the Florida Keys in 1935. The American Red Cross estimated that 409 were killed: 244 known deaths and 165 missing.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 13, 1992
KEY WEST, Fla. -- Ever since the first Spanish sailors filled their ships with gold taken from native Americans and wrecked their vessels on the reefs, it has been possible to make a living in the Florida Keys as a treasure salvor.The Keys' oldest profession, however, is now threatened by a dispute over who controls the coins minted for the king of Spain and deposited in Florida's reefs 150 years before the United States existed.Today, a federal magistrate was to consider whether the salvor Mel Fisher should be allowed to resume blowing holes in the fragile seabed of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
NEWS
August 27, 1992
Ocean City and Maryland officials (and Delaware officials, too) can learn a lot from Hurricane Andrew. For example, how well were the evacuation plans executed in the Florida Keys and the Miami area and in the New Orleans area? And did what happened there suggest that plans in Baltimore's favorite beach resorts need to be changed?Deaths and even property damage from hurricanes are far less today than in the years before weather forecasting was so sophisticated, and federal, state, local and private emergency operations were so widespread.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
The annual Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee has ended in Washington, with a Texas eighth-grader winning $12,000 for spelling P-O-C-O-C-U-R-A-N-T-E. That's $1,091 per letter, but why wreck the mood with cheap math? The winner was Sai Gunturi, whose own name could one day decide a spelling bee. As 251 contestants this week spelled bacillary, cubitiere, exegetical and tessitura, two parents convened in T-I-M-O-N-I-U-M. Their agenda: an alternative spelling bee for their spelling-challenged but otherwise bright children, who no more can spell foraminate, contumelious or sphragistic than their parents can. The C-O-N-S-E-N-S-U-S was that many words are just too darn hard to spell and should be ignored forever.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | April 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - On a recent trip to the Florida Keys, my family and I witnessed two scenes that illustrate some of what is delightful and a bit of what is dismaying in modern America. Let's start with the bad news: We were staying at the most family-oriented resort imaginable, complete with a pirate ship pool and plenty of chicken nuggets on the menu. (This is not the bad part, I'm getting to that.) The air was scented by fragrant flowers (6-year-old Ben's favorite part was riding his bicycle under a canopy of blossoms)
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