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Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Residents inundated by June floods in Western Maryland can apply for $5,000 in state cash, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday. The program will give grants to help cover medical, housing, and food expenses caused by June 12 flash floods that officials said destroyed about 200 homes in Allegany and Washington counties.  O'Malley promised the state would help ease the burden of distressed residents when he visited the area on Wednesday....
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Residents inundated by June floods in Western Maryland can apply for $5,000 in state cash, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday. The program will give grants to help cover medical, housing, and food expenses caused by June 12 flash floods that officials said destroyed about 200 homes in Allegany and Washington counties.  O'Malley promised the state would help ease the burden of distressed residents when he visited the area on Wednesday....
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NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | July 21, 1993
Chicago.--Disaster relief is an American tradition that few challenge. We all suffer hardships, and do not expect the government to rush to our assistance each time an illness or accident plays havoc with our individual lives. But when a whole region is damaged economically, we feel that some form of compensation is needed to restore it to its place in the overall financial health of the nation.There is no absolute case-by-case justice to this. Some of the people in Iowa who will be helped by the government have savings and investments and assets surpassing mine or yours.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
The U.S.-Pakistan relationship is critical to American security interests and the fight against terrorism. It has also been marked in recent years by a jarring note of suspicion and distrust on both sides about the ultimate intentions of the other. U.S. officials have expressed increasing frustration with the Pakistani army's apparent unwillingness to go after Taliban insurgents based along the country's border with Afghanistan. That's why the American response to one of Pakistan's worst-ever natural disasters is of such extraordinary importance.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
The first truckload of bottled water, canned foods, diapers and money collected under "Operation Bring Your Own Bottled Water" left Carroll County Wednesday on the first leg of a journey to the flooded Midwest.Salvation Army workers at Bethesda Methodist Church in Gamber loaded 500 gallons of water and 200 pounds of food and diapers on a truck bound for Washington, D.C., where the items will be placed on a train for shipment to St. Louis, Mo., or Iowa.Rachelle Hurwitz, a Uniontown resident and community activist, initiated the campaign to collect bottled water and other goods for flood victims a month ago. She has been collecting items three or four mornings a week outside the Giant store in Westminster.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 12, 1997
For the next two weeks, three tractor-trailers will be parked at Towson United Methodist Church to receive donations for victims of the flooding along the North Dakota-Minnesota border.Items such as diapers, blankets, toothbrushes and toothpaste and cleaning supplies and nonperishable foods are needed.Donations may be left at the church, 501 Hampton Lane, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. today through Friday and May 19 through 23. Information: 410-823-6511.The effort is being sponsored by Beacon Van Lines, Golden Signs, Re-Creations and Allseason's Transportation, Travel & Tours Inc.Pub Date: 5/12/97
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 5, 1994
It was 10 days before Christmas. What Bonni Crispin saw was not the preholiday festivities of her hometown, Hampstead. She was in the flood-ravaged Midwest. She saw mud."You could see the line where the water had sat in the houses for a very long time," Ms. Crispin said. "It covered the whole first floor. Silos, knocked over like tin cans, were in the middle of the fields. At one intersection, the road was closed to the right because there was no road. It was all dirt."She went to Missouri and Illinois as part of the Carroll County relief program.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
When 13-year-old Katie O'Donnell saw television coverage of pets and animals endangered by Midwest flooding, she decided to do something about it.She wrote Gov. William Donald Schaefer a letter telling him how sad she was about the flooding and she enclosed $3 to help with the relief effort.Her brother Manny saw what she was doing and wanted to help, too."I'm 7 1/2 ," he wrote the governor. "I'm very sorry about the flood. Here is $2."Their parents, Columbia residents Manus and Pat O'Donnell, were not aware of their children's contributions until a Baltimore television station called last week and asked for an interview.
NEWS
By Katherine D. Ramirez and Katherine D. Ramirez,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
Two Maryland Red Cross volunteers left for St. Louis yesterday in a big white rescue truck to help flood victims throughout the Midwest, where at least 22 lives have been lost.Said Columbia's Jeff Pritchard: "This is what I've been trained to do. I'm expected to help people out."Mr. Pritchard, a part-time paid Red Cross employee, and Bunni Martin-Young, currently between jobs in Odenton, will join a team of 17 Marylanders from the Central Maryland chapter of the Red Cross who are already aiding victims of the floods caused by the overflowing Mississippi River.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
After touring the flood-damaged neighborhoods of Edgemere and Millers Island yesterday, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer said state government should do more to assist Tropical Storm Isabel victims. Schaefer, who was briefed on the continuing difficulties of Isabel victims in a lunch meeting with Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. this month, spoke with east-side community activists and flood victims about the problems many have experienced in settling their insurance claims.
NEWS
October 3, 2009
Balto. Co. breaks ground for center 2 Baltimore County broke ground Friday on the $4.5 million Jacksonville Community Center in Phoenix. The 14,400-square-foot facility will include the Jacksonville Senior Center, serving more than 700 seniors, as well as a gymnasium, meeting rooms, and exercise and activity areas. Plans for the 32-acre property on Sweet Air Road also call for two athletic fields, a playground and a walking trail through Sweet Air Park. The center is expected to open in August.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 28, 2008
4 Afghans die in blast outside U.S. Embassy KABUL, Afghanistan: A suicide car bomb targeting a convoy of foreign troops exploded about 200 yards outside the U.S. Embassy in Kabul yesterday, killing at least four Afghan bystanders as people entered the compound for a Thanksgiving Day race. At least 18 others were wounded in the morning attack, said Abdullah Fahim, a Health Ministry spokesman. Police officer Abdul Manan said the explosion was set off by a suicide bomber in a Toyota Corolla.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2005
You had to feel for Brian Wilson when the MTV cameras abruptly switched from him Saturday as he was asking if it would be all right to do a second number for one of the weekend's hurricane relief telethons. Still, someone at MTV had to say "no" at some point. No offense to Wilson, but the telethon had already stretched from three hours to just over four to accommodate all the artists who wanted to participate - and that made the show feel bloated. Especially on the heels of 4 1/2 hours from two telethons Friday and a one-hour NBC fundraiser the weekend before.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
With some Tropical Storm Isabel victims receiving fresh denials of additional coverage under the federal flood insurance program, Maryland's U.S. senators sent a letter yesterday to Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge asking for him to revive a third-party review of unsettled claims. Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski sent another letter to U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft yesterday asking him to look into allegations by flood victims' advocate Steve Kanstoroom that "material misstatements of fact" by officials at the federal flood program and its subcontractors have cost policyholders thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
With 65 Baltimore County families still living in trailers and others in rental properties because their homes were damaged by Tropical Storm Isabel last year, County Executive James T. Smith Jr. said yesterday that government should continue to help storm victims. "We can't tire just because it's been a year later," Smith said at a news conference, where he called for reforms to the National Flood Insurance Program and requested more financial assistance for storm victims. Smith said he was proud of his administration's response to the storm, including the emergency assistance to victims and help in cleaning up battered communities.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
FORT MYERS BEACH, Fla. - Steve Kanstoroom, whose home on Maryland's Eastern Shore was gutted last year by Tropical Storm Isabel, wandered up a driveway near Florida's Gulf coast this week and found a couple sorting through the wreckage left by Hurricane Charley. The washer and dryer, the furniture, the clothes and even the walls - everything in the first-floor apartment seemed a total loss to Rachel Zammit. She said her flood insurance adjuster set the damage at $1,000. The stress, she said, has her smoking again.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 1997
NEARLY A DOZEN members of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in Taneytown are leaving this weekend for South Dakota to help repair houses damaged by spring floods.The group will visit the aptly named community of Watertown, where they will spend a week fixing homes mostly of elderly flood victims.The Rev. John S. Douglas, who will accompany the expedition, said volunteers do more than repair homes when they visit disaster areas. They also provide emotional and spiritual support to victims.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
A Washington law firm filed suit yesterday in federal court on behalf of thousands of Tropical Storm Isabel victims, alleging that seven insurance companies systematically sought to shortchange flood policyholders. The class action suit, apparently the first ever to target private insurance companies for their handling of policies from the federal government's flood insurance program, claims that victims were coerced to sign "proof of loss" forms that understated their damages. The suit also alleges that the insurance companies employed price guidelines that significantly underestimated the cost of labor and materials.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
A dozen Maryland residents hand-picked by state officials to represent victims of Tropical Storm Isabel are calling on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Maryland Insurance Commissioner Alfred W. Redmer Jr. to put more pressure on federal officials to process flood insurance claims fairly and quickly. At a meeting last night in Annapolis, the residents, many still living in Federal Emergency Management Agency trailers, told officials that they have not received adequate insurance settlements to help them rebuild.
NEWS
By Lester J. Davis and Lester J. Davis,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
More than a year after a flash flood left five homes flooded and caused tens of thousands of dollars in damage, the residents of a Northeast Baltimore block are still waiting to know whether Baltimore officials will take responsibility for what homeowners say were the city's faulty drainage pipes. Henry Boulware, 79, who had to take out a second mortgage for repairs, hangs his head when talking about his "ruined basement and living room floor." Pam Luallen becomes teary-eyed each time she goes to her basement to wash clothes.
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