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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Just when the upper Potomac River seemed to be rounding into shape for fall fishing after a spring and summer of unusually frequent and heavy rainfalls, remnants of Hurricane Fran swept across the watershed.Fran, which came ashore in the Carolinas as a strong hurricane, passed through Maryland with 40 mph winds and, in some areas, torrential rains.For bay fishermen, Fran was a short-lived inconvenience causing high tides and, for about 24 hours, stormy seas -- both of which abated quickly and caused little damage.
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By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 16, 2014
The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for Howard County and the surrounding region Friday as heavy rainfall soaks the area. The warning will be in effect until 12:15 p.m. Friday, according to the NWS.  As of 9:27 a.m. Friday, the NWS reported ongoing flooding in the Little Patuxent River and that "additional streams are likely to reach flood stage later this morning. " As of 10 a.m. Friday the NWS estimated two to three inches of rain had already fallen on the region and that little additional accumulation, up to a quarter of an inch of rain, is expected for the remainder of the day.  The Maryland State Highway Administration released the following list of warnings for motorists: Keep gas tanks full in case of unexpected and possible lengthy detours; Keep a charged cellphone handy, but don't use while driving unless hands-free; Never try to move tree branches that have been entangled in electrical wires or try to move a fallen electrical or communication cable from the travel lanes; Be on alert for animals, such as deer, crossing the roads as they flee flooded areas; Ensure that windshield wipers and all headlights, hazard lights and turn signals are in proper working order Allow extra braking distance.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2011
The Susquehanna River dropped back below flood stage Monday afternoon and residents of Port Deposit and Havre de Grace were busy trying to get to their homes and businesses to clean up. Jeff Harris, owner of Starbird Canvas in Havre de Grace, found about two feet of water flooding the store when he returned. "There's mud everywhere," Harris said. "The whole marina is covered in mud. … If this was my primary shop, it would be about two weeks before I'd be able to work again, and that would have a significant impact on my income.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2011
The Susquehanna River dropped back below flood stage Monday afternoon and residents of Port Deposit and Havre de Grace were busy trying to get to their homes and businesses to clean up. Jeff Harris, owner of Starbird Canvas in Havre de Grace, found about two feet of water flooding the store when he returned. "There's mud everywhere," Harris said. "The whole marina is covered in mud. … If this was my primary shop, it would be about two weeks before I'd be able to work again, and that would have a significant impact on my income.
NEWS
BY KAYLA BAWROSKI AND KIRSTEN DIZEThe Aegis | September 10, 2011
As the flood waters from the Susquehanna River started to recede Saturday, Havre de Grace and Perryville were recovering, while Port Deposit officials were still evaluating flood damage and had not allowed residents to return to the town as of midday The river actually reached its crest, peak stage level — 32.41 feet, at Conowingo Dam Friday at 9:15 a.m., according to flow gauge data from the U.S. Geological Survey. The peak water flow through the massive structure, which reached 778,000 cubic feet per second, was less than what dam officials and emergency officials on both sides of the river had initially expected as the Susquehanna carried off the torrents of rain from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Still, based upon historical data, the river at Conowingo Friday rose to the third highest level in the 83-year-old dam's history.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 8, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- The last crest is passing, and the rivers are falling. The driving rains are giving way to the humid dog days that are the hallmark of summer in the upper Midwest.As the water recedes, the toll is starting to emerge. By the time the final feeble crest rolls past Cairo, Ill., on Monday, the rivers will have flooded 23,500 square miles of land, an area that, if combined, would exceed that of Lake Michigan.Yet it is a catastrophe that left its deepest scars on the smallest of scales.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Officials in Port Deposit said Saturday that 30 floodgates remained open at the Conowingo Dam as water steadily receded, though the town remained under its mandatory evacuation. "It's looking a lot better than yesterday," said Mike Dixon, Cecil County spokesman. "The water is slowly receding, so it appears the worst has passed. But it will take some time for it to clear out. " As Port Deposit and Havre de Grace continued to deal with flooding and debris in the streets Friday, the Conowingo Dam's operator said a surge in water coming down the Susquehanna River, officials had anticipated opening all of the Dam's 50 floodgates; the most that were opened during the flooding caused by heavy rains from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee was 43 on Thursday night.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 16, 2014
The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for Howard County and the surrounding region Friday as heavy rainfall soaks the area. The warning will be in effect until 12:15 p.m. Friday, according to the NWS.  As of 9:27 a.m. Friday, the NWS reported ongoing flooding in the Little Patuxent River and that "additional streams are likely to reach flood stage later this morning. " As of 10 a.m. Friday the NWS estimated two to three inches of rain had already fallen on the region and that little additional accumulation, up to a quarter of an inch of rain, is expected for the remainder of the day.  The Maryland State Highway Administration released the following list of warnings for motorists: Keep gas tanks full in case of unexpected and possible lengthy detours; Keep a charged cellphone handy, but don't use while driving unless hands-free; Never try to move tree branches that have been entangled in electrical wires or try to move a fallen electrical or communication cable from the travel lanes; Be on alert for animals, such as deer, crossing the roads as they flee flooded areas; Ensure that windshield wipers and all headlights, hazard lights and turn signals are in proper working order Allow extra braking distance.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 15, 1994
Like sponges too drenched to absorb anymore, the overflowing Mississippi River and other tributaries around central and southern Illinois sent thousands of residents back to sandbagging yesterday with visions of last year's flood.Along the Mississippi from St. Louis to Illinois' southern tip, volunteers worked to bolster levees that were facing their first test since being rebuilt temporarily after the Flood of 1993. The ground is still so soggy from last year's floodwaters that new rainwater is simply running off.In central Illinois, towns unaffected last year battled some of the worst flooding in memory.
NEWS
December 27, 1991
WHARTON, Texas -- Some southeastern Texas residents headed for higher ground, and others waited it out at home today, as rain-swollen rivers threatened more destruction in the region declared a disaster area by President Bush.Bush flew over some of the areas hit hardest by flooding this morning, including Travis and Bosque counties, before landing at Chase Naval Air Field in Beeville, 60 miles from this hard-hit town.Floods caused by record-breaking rainfall over the past week have killed at least 15 people across Texas, swamped farmland, drowned scores of livestock and caused millions of dollars in damage.
NEWS
BY KAYLA BAWROSKI AND KIRSTEN DIZEThe Aegis | September 10, 2011
As the flood waters from the Susquehanna River started to recede Saturday, Havre de Grace and Perryville were recovering, while Port Deposit officials were still evaluating flood damage and had not allowed residents to return to the town as of midday The river actually reached its crest, peak stage level — 32.41 feet, at Conowingo Dam Friday at 9:15 a.m., according to flow gauge data from the U.S. Geological Survey. The peak water flow through the massive structure, which reached 778,000 cubic feet per second, was less than what dam officials and emergency officials on both sides of the river had initially expected as the Susquehanna carried off the torrents of rain from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Still, based upon historical data, the river at Conowingo Friday rose to the third highest level in the 83-year-old dam's history.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Officials in Port Deposit said Saturday that 30 floodgates remained open at the Conowingo Dam as water steadily receded, though the town remained under its mandatory evacuation. "It's looking a lot better than yesterday," said Mike Dixon, Cecil County spokesman. "The water is slowly receding, so it appears the worst has passed. But it will take some time for it to clear out. " As Port Deposit and Havre de Grace continued to deal with flooding and debris in the streets Friday, the Conowingo Dam's operator said a surge in water coming down the Susquehanna River, officials had anticipated opening all of the Dam's 50 floodgates; the most that were opened during the flooding caused by heavy rains from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee was 43 on Thursday night.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Just when the upper Potomac River seemed to be rounding into shape for fall fishing after a spring and summer of unusually frequent and heavy rainfalls, remnants of Hurricane Fran swept across the watershed.Fran, which came ashore in the Carolinas as a strong hurricane, passed through Maryland with 40 mph winds and, in some areas, torrential rains.For bay fishermen, Fran was a short-lived inconvenience causing high tides and, for about 24 hours, stormy seas -- both of which abated quickly and caused little damage.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 8, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- The last crest is passing, and the rivers are falling. The driving rains are giving way to the humid dog days that are the hallmark of summer in the upper Midwest.As the water recedes, the toll is starting to emerge. By the time the final feeble crest rolls past Cairo, Ill., on Monday, the rivers will have flooded 23,500 square miles of land, an area that, if combined, would exceed that of Lake Michigan.Yet it is a catastrophe that left its deepest scars on the smallest of scales.
NEWS
By Richard Fausset and Richard Fausset,Tribune Newspapers | September 23, 2009
ATLANTA - -The state of Georgia faced continuing headaches and heartache Tuesday from a pernicious series of rainstorms that had claimed the lives of at least seven people and flooded more than 1,000 homes - although weather forecasters said the worst of the deluge likely had passed. On Tuesday morning, Gov. Sonny Perdue formally asked President Barack Obama for an emergency declaration that would make the hardest-hit areas eligible for federal disaster relief funds. A day earlier, Perdue had declared a state of emergency in 17 counties in the Atlanta area and North Georgia.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER AND FRANK D. ROYLANCE and MICHAEL DRESSER AND FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
Torrential rain from a new storm out of the south lashed an already saturated Maryland overnight, as emergency officials braced for what could be a scene of widespread damage and disruption this morning. Forecasters were warning of an additional 3 to 5 inches of rain last night and today - with downpours of up to 8 inches in especially unlucky locations. "It's not good news," said Bob Oravec, lead forecaster at the National Hydrometeorological Prediction Center in Camp Springs. Streams already at flood stage "are not going to be helped by additional runoff," he said.
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