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NEWS
February 15, 2014
The recent letter to the editor from a Baltimore doctor critical of flood insurance as a benefit for the rich ("Government offers a flood of help for the rich," Feb. 12) is a good example of how intelligent people on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay just do not understand that flood insurance touches people who have lived in towns and rural areas of the lower Eastern Shore for generations. These locals are not wealthy and many are living on the edge, especially in all of the waterman communities.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski joined a bipartisan chorus of lawmakers Monday calling on the Obama administration to speed up the implementation of a law intended to mitigate increases in flood insurance premiums. In a letter to Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mikulski wrote that families on the Eastern Shore whose homes are located in the state's floodplain are facing "astronomical increases in their flood insurance premiums. " President Obama signed bipartisan legislation last month to stop those premium increases but several lawmakers have raised concerns that FEMA is not moving quickly enough to implement the law. "Without immediate implementation ... my constituents face enormous increases in their flood insurance premiums which could cause serious financial hardship and even the loss of their homes," the Maryland Democrat wrote.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Steven Yancheski and his wife bought their Fort Howard home at a foreclosure auction in 2010, they thought they were getting a deal: a two-bedroom bungalow in "paradise" for about $85,000. The house was in a flood zone, so they had to pay for flood insurance, but the $800 annual premium did not deter them. However, the new $2,500 yearly rate they will start paying in March is another story. "I would never have been able, in my way of thinking, to afford this if I would have known the flood insurance would be $2,500.
NEWS
February 15, 2014
The recent letter to the editor from a Baltimore doctor critical of flood insurance as a benefit for the rich ("Government offers a flood of help for the rich," Feb. 12) is a good example of how intelligent people on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay just do not understand that flood insurance touches people who have lived in towns and rural areas of the lower Eastern Shore for generations. These locals are not wealthy and many are living on the edge, especially in all of the waterman communities.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 5, 2012
The Consumer Federation of America says yes. The nonprofit estimates Sandy will lead to 200,000 flood insurance claims, exhausting the National Flood Insurance Program. The CFA says Congress will have to swiftly authorize additional money to meet those claims. Makes you wonder if a polarized Congress will be able to pass such an authorization, or whether stalling will occur by politicians seeking to score some points.  But I digress.  Anyway, the CFA offers tips on how to get a fair claim payment on homeowner's insurance:  -     Report the claim as quickly as possible, because with insurance companies, it's first come, first served.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
A recent headline stated that "Congress approves more aid for Sandy's victims" (Jan 5). Really? My take is that what Congress did was require our children to borrow another $10 billion to pay contractual obligations of government insurance claims. Insurance premiums are only covering about 1 percent of previous claims, and our children will pay the other 99 percent. Soon another $50 billion will be added to the tab, and Sandy will not be the last disaster. The government needs to either get out of the flood-insurance business or make premiums cover outlays.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 30, 2012
The Property Casualty Insurers Association of America released information on what consumers need to know about flood insurance: Regular homeowner's insurance covers damage from a storm, but not  from flooding. You need to buy a policy from the National Flood Insurance Program to protect your house and property. (You can buy it through an insurance agent.) Flood insurance covers physical losses from flood or flood-related erosion caused by waves or currents. The typical policy covers structural damage and damage to to air conditioners, furnaces, water heaters and any clean-up required.
NEWS
By Stephanie Tracy and Stephanie Tracy,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Free workshops will be offered Monday and Tuesday to improve Maryland insurance agents' knowledge of flood insurance policies and the National Flood Insurance Program. The workshops will cover topics including rules and regulations for flood insurance, how to write flood insurance policies and consequences of not writing such a policy. Two workshops will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday at the Holiday Inn Express in Cambridge, and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday at the Sheraton Barcelo Annapolis Hotel in Annapolis.
NEWS
July 13, 1993
For some Americans watching and reading about the unprecedented floodwater damage in the Middle West, sympathy and generosity are going to be tempered when they get the bill. That is because much of the disaster relief cost is going to be for repairing or replacing structures built dangerously close to rivers well known for their destructiveness. In many cases -- too many -- these structures have been flooded out again and again, and rehabilitation has been subsidized each time.The subsidies come in two forms.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House of Representatives passed the Senate's version of a bill yesterday to reform the federal flood insurance program. The bill, which now goes to the president for his signature, includes several amendments written by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland that are designed to prevent a repeat of problems that have affected Tropical Storm Isabel victims. The reforms include increased education requirements for flood insurance agents and adjusters, and the creation of an appeals system for those dissatisfied with their settlements.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Steven Yancheski and his wife bought their Fort Howard home at a foreclosure auction in 2010, they thought they were getting a deal: a two-bedroom bungalow in "paradise" for about $85,000. The house was in a flood zone, so they had to pay for flood insurance, but the $800 annual premium did not deter them. However, the new $2,500 yearly rate they will start paying in March is another story. "I would never have been able, in my way of thinking, to afford this if I would have known the flood insurance would be $2,500.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
The Baltimore City Department of Planning is hosting a town hall meeting Tuesday evening where new tidal flood maps will be presented to residents. The meeting is scheduled for 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the War Memorial Building (101 N. Gay St.), near City Hall. "The public is invited to come learn about how changes to the flood plain maps will impact them and their properties - and more importantly how they may be able to save money on flood insurance," according to a statement from the department.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
A recent headline stated that "Congress approves more aid for Sandy's victims" (Jan 5). Really? My take is that what Congress did was require our children to borrow another $10 billion to pay contractual obligations of government insurance claims. Insurance premiums are only covering about 1 percent of previous claims, and our children will pay the other 99 percent. Soon another $50 billion will be added to the tab, and Sandy will not be the last disaster. The government needs to either get out of the flood-insurance business or make premiums cover outlays.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 5, 2012
The Consumer Federation of America says yes. The nonprofit estimates Sandy will lead to 200,000 flood insurance claims, exhausting the National Flood Insurance Program. The CFA says Congress will have to swiftly authorize additional money to meet those claims. Makes you wonder if a polarized Congress will be able to pass such an authorization, or whether stalling will occur by politicians seeking to score some points.  But I digress.  Anyway, the CFA offers tips on how to get a fair claim payment on homeowner's insurance:  -     Report the claim as quickly as possible, because with insurance companies, it's first come, first served.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 30, 2012
The Property Casualty Insurers Association of America released information on what consumers need to know about flood insurance: Regular homeowner's insurance covers damage from a storm, but not  from flooding. You need to buy a policy from the National Flood Insurance Program to protect your house and property. (You can buy it through an insurance agent.) Flood insurance covers physical losses from flood or flood-related erosion caused by waves or currents. The typical policy covers structural damage and damage to to air conditioners, furnaces, water heaters and any clean-up required.
EXPLORE
avought@theaegis.com | September 6, 2012
The Bel Air Board of Town Commissioners approved a new Flood Mitigation Plan Tuesday that town officials say should save some property owners money on their insurance in the future. At their 40-minute town meeting, the commissioners also approved a paving contract for Winding Alley in Howard Park and set some new parking limits in the downtown area. Also approved were two changes involving stop signs, including the removal of the stop at Kenmore Avenue and Heighe Street, which was rendered unnecessary by new traffic patterns associated with the new Bel Air High School building.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
The director of the National Flood Insurance Program acknowledged yesterday that his office should do more to educate agents and consumers about flood policies to prevent problems like those complained about by Tropical Storm Isabel victims. But the director, Anthony S. Lowe, defended his agency's response to the storm, saying that the volume of complaints is small compared with the 24,000 claims it has processed since the storm. "Not to lessen the impact of the need to inform consumers and to process in a timely way, in a fair way, their claims, but I think in terms of the big picture, I think we've got to keep it in perspective," Lowe said.
NEWS
By BETH MILLEMANN | August 30, 1992
Washington -- For the past week, the nation watched in horror as Florida counties and Louisiana parishes fell before the onslaught of Hurricane Andrew. Already called the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, Andrew's statistics shock by their size:* Some 250,000 Floridians have lost their homes.* The price tag for property damages in Florida is at least $15 billion.* More than 1 1/2 million people fled New Orleans in a 48-hour period.* Southern Louisiana was hit with 10 inches of rain in a day.* Louisiana residents fleeing the southern part of their state caused a 3 1/2 -mile traffic jam on Highway 90.The most shocking statistic of all, of course, is the loss of human lives to the storm: more than a doz- p en fatalities already identified with hundreds more injured.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
County officials are urging residents to purchase insurance policies if their homes have recently been added to newly redrawn flood insurance rate maps. The Federal Emergency Management Agency worked with Maryland's Department of the Environment to overhaul the statewide maps, which show which homes and businesses are most susceptible to flooding, and thus are generally required to buy flood insurance . In Howard County, the maps have not changed since 1986. Because of better technology, an additional 360 residences and 130 other structures near rivers and streams will be identified as being at risk of flooding, unless their owners appeal.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
On behalf of FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), I'm writing in response to your March 14 opinion piece, "Warming: Storm damage ahead" to add insight about flood risk and the NFIP. Your editorial addresses how climate change will add to the likelihood of flooding, especially in coastal areas. Floods are our nation's most common and costly natural disaster and occur in all areas of the country. Everyone should understand that we all are at some risk for flooding and that the time to protect ourselves is now. In fact, due to the wide spread risk of flooding, many insurance companies stopped selling flood insurance as far back as the 1960s.
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